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Recent Additions

Longitudinal Religious Congregations and Membership File, 1980-2010 (County Level) (Uploaded: 5/9/2018)

This dataset is a longitudinal version of the Churches and Church Membership in the United States studies from 1980 and 1990, and the Religious Congregations and Membership Studies from 2000 and 2010. It contains the adherent and congregation counts of 302 religious groups that participated in at least one of the 1980-2010 data collections.

It is very important to understand how this file differs from its standalone counterparts, and its many limitations. Using these data for over-time comparisons without reading any documentation will likely result in inaccurate statistics. Data users are strongly urged to read the paper by Rachel Bacon, Roger Finke and Dale Jones that details all the changes made when creating the longitudinal file. Major changes made to the file include new variable naming schemes, new combined religious groups that correct for schisms and mergers, new adherent counts for the United Methodist Church, count estimates for missing data among 40 groups and aggregated county units.

Longitudinal Religious Congregations and Membership File, 1980-2010 (State Level) (Uploaded: 5/9/2018)

This dataset is a longitudinal version of the Churches and Church Membership in the United States studies from 1980 and 1990, and the Religious Congregations and Membership Studies from 2000 and 2010. It contains the adherent and congregation counts of 302 religious groups that participated in at least one of the 1980-2010 data collections.

It is very important to understand how this file differs from its standalone counterparts, and its many limitations. Using these data for over-time comparisons without reading any documentation will likely result in inaccurate statistics. Data users are strongly urged to read the paper by Rachel Bacon, Roger Finke and Dale Jones that details all the changes made when creating the longitudinal file. Major changes made to the file include new variable naming schemes, new combined religious groups that correct for schisms and mergers, new adherent counts for the United Methodist Church, and count estimates for missing data among 40 groups.

Caucasus Barometer 2012, Merged (Uploaded: 4/9/2018)

The Caucasus Research Resource Centers (CRRC) conducts this annual survey in the South Caucasus (i.e., Armenia, Azerbaijan and Georgia) in order to gauge the social, political and economic issues in the former Soviet Union region. This is the only survey in the region providing reliable comparative data about the opinions, household composition, and economic behavior of the population of the three countries. In addition to the questions asked in previous rounds, CRRC has included new questions assessing social capital and religious views - the latter were asked in collaboration with ARDA. The same survey and methodological approach is applied to all three countries.

This merged data file contains the respondents from all three South Caucasus countries and their survey responses. The data file contains 6,715 cases total (2,382 in Armenia, 1,829 in Azerbaijan, and 2,502 in Georgia). Variables were dropped that were not asked across all three countries. So, although Armenian respondents were asked additional questions pertaining to the Armenian Genocide and Georgian respondents were asked additional questions about opinions toward Joseph Stalin, those survey items can only be accessed by downloading the individual country data files (see ARDA’s Data Archive for those files). Moreover string/character (non-numeric) variables are not available in the merged data file.

General Social Survey, 2016, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing) (Uploaded: 4/9/2018)

This file differs from the General Social Survey 2016 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2016 GSS.

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1988 (Uploaded: 4/9/2018)

"The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 3, 1988, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.

Evangelization and Outreach in U.S. Orthodox Parishes (Uploaded: 4/9/2018)

"Go and Make Disciples: Evangelization and Outreach Efforts in U.S. Orthodox Parishes" is the first ever national study on evangelization and outreach practices in U.S. Orthodox Christian Churches. The study was initiated by and conducted under the auspices of the Committee for Agencies and Endorsed Organizations of the Assembly of the Canonical Orthodox Bishops of the United States of America. It surveys the priests of 75 Orthodox congregations across the U.S. concerning the demographic composition, context, congregational life, and outreach efforts of their parish.

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1994 (Uploaded: 2/23/2018)

"The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 5, 1994, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2016 - 1001 New Worshiping Communities, Clergy (Uploaded: 2/23/2018)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. "At the 2012 General Assembly (GA), PC(USA) leaders encouraged Presbyterians to create 1,001 new worshiping communities (NWCs) between 2012 and 2022. The objectives of this panel were to (1) identify how aware today's Presbyterians are of the 1001 NWC initiative, (2) assess how engaged they are in the initiative, and (3) compare current panelists' awareness of and involvement in the 1001 NWC initiative to panelists from 2014." (1001 New Worshiping Communities: The Report of the Volume 2: 2016 Presbyterian Panel Survey). This dataset contains data from clergy of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2016 - 1001 New Worshiping Communities, Members (Uploaded: 2/23/2018)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. "At the 2012 General Assembly (GA), PC(USA) leaders encouraged Presbyterians to create 1,001 new worshiping communities (NWCs) between 2012 and 2022. The objectives of this panel were to (1) identify how aware today's Presbyterians are of the 1001 NWC initiative, (2) assess how engaged they are in the initiative, and (3) compare current panelists' awareness of and involvement in the 1001 NWC initiative to panelists from 2014." (1001 New Worshiping Communities: The Report of the Volume 2: 2016 Presbyterian Panel Survey). This dataset contains data from members and elders of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2016 - 1001 New Worshiping Communities, All (Uploaded: 2/23/2018)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. "At the 2012 General Assembly (GA), PC(USA) leaders encouraged Presbyterians to create 1,001 new worshiping communities (NWCs) between 2012 and 2022. The objectives of this panel were to (1) identify how aware today's Presbyterians are of the 1001 NWC initiative, (2) assess how engaged they are in the initiative, and (3) compare current panelists' awareness of and involvement in the 1001 NWC initiative to panelists from 2014." (1001 New Worshiping Communities: The Report of the Volume 2: 2016 Presbyterian Panel Survey). This dataset contains data from clergy, members and elders of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).

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