Data Archive

Data Archive > Most Recent Additions

Search Data Archive:
 

Recent Additions

Religion and Politics Survey, January 2016 (Uploaded: 4/3/2017)

The January 2016 Political Survey, fielded for the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press by Abt SRBI, obtained telephone interviews with a representative sample of 2,009 adults living in the United States (504 respondents were interviewed on a landline telephone and 1,505 were interviewed on a cell phone). Interviewing was conducted from January 7th to 14th, 2016 in English and Spanish. Samples were drawn from both the landline and cell phone RDD frames. Persons with residential landlines were not screened out of the cell phone sample. Both the landline and cell phone samples were provided by Survey Sampling International. The combined sample is weighted to match demographic parameters from the American Community Survey and telephone status parameters from the National Health Interview Survey. The weighting procedure also accounts for the fact that respondents with both a landline and cell phone had a greater probability of selection. The margin of sampling error for weighted estimates based on the full sample is ± 2.46 percentage points.

General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing) (Uploaded: 4/3/2017)

This file differs from the General Social Survey 2014 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2014 GSS. There are a total of 3,842 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, February 2012 (Uploaded: 4/3/2017)

The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward topics discussed in the country today. Questions explored attitudes toward American Muslims, teenagers' access to birth control, and employer birth control coverage.

August 2011 Political Survey (Uploaded: 1/23/2017)

The August 2011 Political Survey, sponsored by the Pew Research Center, obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,509 adults living in the continental United States. Interviews were conducted via landline (nLL=905) and cell phone (nC=604, including 268 without a landline phone). The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The interviews were conducted in English and Spanish by Princeton Data Source from Aug. 17-21, 2011. This survey contains questions on attitudes towards terrorism and Islam.

Faith Communities Today Survey (FACT) 2010, Christian Reformed Churches (Uploaded: 1/23/2017)

The Faith Communities Today 2010 national survey brings together 26 individual surveys of congregations. Twenty-four were conducted by or for partner denominations and faith groups, representing 32 of the country’s largest denominations and traditions. The common core questionnaire of the survey replicates more than 150 questions from the 2000, 2005 and 2008 surveys, plus a special section on the 2008 recession.

This file represents the subsample collected from congregations of the Christian Reformed Church in North America.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2012 - Current Issues in Church and Society, Clergy (Uploaded: 1/23/2017)

Summary: The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, ruling elders currently on session, and teaching elders (pastors, serving congregations, and specialized ministers, serving elsewhere.) New samples are drawn every three years.

The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 2012 survey focuses on Current Issues in Church and Society. This dataset contains data from sampled clergy.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2012 - Current Issues in Church and Society, All (Uploaded: 1/23/2017)

Summary: The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, ruling elders currently on session, and teaching elders (pastors, serving congregations, and specialized ministers, serving elsewhere.) New samples are drawn every three years.

The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 2012 survey focuses on Current Issues in Church and Society. This dataset contains data from all sampled constituency groups.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2012 - Current Issues in Church and Society, Members and Elders (Uploaded: 1/23/2017)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, ruling elders currently on session, and teaching elders (pastors, serving congregations, and specialized ministers, serving elsewhere.) New samples are drawn every three years.

The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 2012 survey focuses on Current Issues in Church and Society. This dataset contains data from sampled members and elders.

Muslim American Survey, 2011 (Uploaded: 12/12/2016)

In 2007, the Pew Research Center conducted the first-ever nationwide survey of Muslim Americans. As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 approached, it seemed an appropriate time to survey Muslim Americans again and take stock of any important changes in the attitudes, opinions and experiences of this growing segment of U.S. society. The 2011 survey repeats many key questions from the 2007 poll. It also closely follows the methodology of the previous survey, including the use of random-digit-dialing to screen a large number of households (more than 41,000) to obtain a representative national sample of Muslims. As in 2007, interviews were conducted not only in English but also in Arabic, Urdu and Farsi, helping to ensure coverage of parts of the heavily immigrant Muslim American population that could be missed by an English-only survey.

The Pew Research Center study was able to complete interviews with 1,033 Muslim American adults 18 years old and older from a probability sample consisting of three sampling frames. Interviews were conducted by telephone between April 14 and July 22, 2001 by the research firm Abt SRBI.

Political Polarization and Typology Survey, 2014 (Uploaded: 12/12/2016)

The 2014 Pew Political Typology Survey, fielded for the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press by Abt SRBI, completed telephone interviews with a representative sample of 10,013 adults living in the United States (5,010 respondents were interviewed on a landline telephone and 5,003 were interviewed on a cell phone). Data collection was divided equally into three phases (A, B, and C) with non-overlapping field dates. Each third of the interviews was essentially treated as a separate study with separate samples, field dates, weighting and questionnaires, although some questions were asked throughout all three phases.


Bookmark and Share