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National Poll on Social Capital (ENCAS) 2006 (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

The National Poll on Social Capital (ENCAS) is a survey developed by the Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL) and the United Nations Development Programme in Mexico (UNPD). The objective is to provide information about the social capital of Mexico. Social capital, referring to the norms and social networks that allow collective action, is presumed to be an element that allows greater action power for communities and leads to greater efficiency for public programs through the participation of the citizen in the search for a higher quality of life. For this reason SEDESOL developed a source of data that allows a better understanding of the magnitude of the relationship between social capital, social networks, and collective results.

This study was realized for the first time in 2006 in the urban regions (ENCAS 2006), and in 2011 rural regions were incorporated (ENCAS 2011).

Pre-Election American Values Survey, 2012 (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Institute’s annual multi-issue survey on religion, values and public policy. The survey is conducted each fall, and on election years includes both a pre-election and post-election survey.

The 2012 Pre-Election Survey focused heavily on religious change in America and the 2012 presidential election. The survey included questions that measured current and childhood religious affiliation. Questions covered a variety of topics including attitudes toward political leaders, and views about abortion, same-sex marriage the contraception mandate and immigration.

Post-Election American Values Survey, 2012 (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Institute’s annual multi-issue survey on religion, values and public policy. The survey is conducted in the fall each year and on election years includes both a pre-election component and post-election follow-up survey.

The 2012 Post-Election Survey consisted of interviews with 1,410 respondents who were part of the pre-election American Values Survey (October 2012). The survey focused on the 2012 presidential campaign, voting behavior, including early voting practices and gauged views of the candidates on a variety of metrics. The survey also included a battery of questions to assess opinions about government infrastructure spending, taxation and level of comfort with spending cuts.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2028 Johns, Civilian Casualties and Support for War (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

This experiment examines how the social/political conditions of a target country and the number of estimated casualties affect the support for attacking the target country. This project includes two vignette-based survey experiments. Each involves random assignment to a relatively large number of conditions (i.e., different vignettes): 12 in the case of Experiment 1 and 16 in the case of Experiment 2:

Experiment 1-- A. Target state is hypothetical. B. Variables manipulated: political nature of target state (democracy or dictatorship); dominant faith of target state (Islamic or Christian); and anticipated civilian death toll (no mention or 100 or 3,000). C. Number of total conditions: 12.

Experiment 2 -- A. Target state is Iran. B. Variables manipulated: anticipated civilian death toll (50 or 500 or 5,000 or 50,000); framing of civilian casualties (‘civilian casualties’ or ‘innocent Iranians dying, many of them women and children’); and anticipated success (delay nuclear program in Iran by a year or delay by 10 years). C. Number of total conditions: 16.

The order of the two experiments is randomized across respondents (e.g., half doing Experiment 1 first and half doing Experiment 2 first).

Religion among Academic Scientists (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

The Religion among Academic Scientists survey (RAAS) asked a randomly selected sample of natural and social scientists at 21 elite research universities questions about their religious beliefs, behaviors, and upbringing. The survey also asked about the professional status, volunteering activities, and demographics of the respondents.

Pew 2011 National Survey of Mormons (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

Over the years, numerous polls have gauged public attitudes toward Mormons, who make up about two percent of all U.S. adults. But what do Mormons themselves think about their place in American life? With the rising prominence of members of the LDS Church in politics, popular culture and the media, do Mormons feel more secure and accepted in American society? What do they think of other religions? What do they believe, how do they practice their faith and what do they see as essential to being a good Mormon and to leading a good life?

To answer such questions, the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life conducted the 2011 National Survey of Mormons. A report detailing the survey’s findings, “Mormons in America,” was released in January, 2012 and is available on the Forum’s website here

The study had two main goals. First, it sought to learn about Mormons’ perceptions of American society and of their own place within it at a time when Mormons and Mormonism are receiving increased attention in the news media and popular culture. Second, it sought to assess the degree to which Mormons resemble or are distinctive from the broader public in their social and political attitudes and in their religious beliefs and practices. As such, the survey included a mix of new questions specific to Mormons and Mormonism and “trend” questions that have previously been asked of the general population in Pew Research Center surveys. The development of the survey questionnaire was informed by the advice and feedback received from a panel of advisers with expertise in the study of the U.S. Mormon population.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2042 Creighton, Perceptions of Islam, Migration, and Citizenship in the United States (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

This list experiment tests whether views toward immigrants depend on whether the immigrant group shares the same religion as the respondent. Since traditional survey methods may be more prone to social desirability bias, an experimental design is necessary. In this study, respondents are divided between a control group and, in this case, two treatment groups. The control group is just asked three questions unrelated to immigration. The first treatment group is asked the original three questions, but with an additional question pertaining to Muslim immigrants. The second treatment group is asked the original three questions, but with an additional question pertaining to Christian immigrants. In its most basic incarnation, the comparison of the mean of the responses to the control list with the mean of the responses to each of the treatments offers an estimate of the proportion opposed to the additional list item.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2011 - Churchwide Special Offerings, All (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2011 survey focuses on special offerings. This dataset contains data from all sampled constituency groups.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2011 - Churchwide Special Offerings, Clergy (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2011 survey focuses on churchwide special offerings. This dataset contains data from clergy members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Pastors and specialized clergy constitute this sample.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2095 Piazza, Terrorism Suspect Religious Identity and Support for Controversial Practices (Uploaded: 1/16/2015)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

The following study executes a survey experiment involving four treatment vignettes and one control vignette and 17 survey questions administered to 1,135 respondents. Respondents are randomly assigned to one of the five treatments which depict a short AP newswire blurb describing an arrest of two terrorist suspects in suburban Chicago. The treatments are identical to one another except they vary the names of the suspects (stereotypical Arabic/Muslim vs. Anglo-American) and the names of the terrorist movement the suspects are alleged to be members of (radical Islamists vs. right-wing American extremist). The control vignette omits any identification of the suspect names or groups. All respondents are then asked 13 questions rating their support for / approval of controversial interrogation and detention practices (10 interrogation practices, including the use of physical abuse of suspects, and three detention practices, including indefinite detention of suspects) that have been used by U.S. counterterrorism officials since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.