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Faith Matters Survey, 2007 (Uploaded: 3/16/2015)

The 2007 Faith Matters Survey was conducted on behalf of Harvard University by International Communications Research. The survey was generously funded by the John Templeton Foundation. This collection reinterviewed the respondents from 2006 Faith Matters Survey about their religion (beliefs, belonging and behavior) and their social and political engagement. The data provide precise measurements of religious belief and behavior to help scholars determine their relative stability among different sub-populations and as compared to nonreligious beliefs and behaviors. Some variable names have been modified by the ARDA. Original variable names are in parentheses.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Seventh-Day Adventist Church Leader Survey (Uploaded: 3/16/2015)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2)ómaking it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (3) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for the Seventh-day Adventist Church Leader Survey for congregations participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 Seventh-day Adventist Attender data and Seventh-day Adventist Congregational Profile data will be provided in separate data files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Seventh-Day Adventist Church Congregational Profile Survey (Uploaded: 3/16/2015)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2)ómaking it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c ) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for the sample of the Seventh-day Adventist Church congregations that completed the Congregational Profile Survey form. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 Seventh-day Adventist Attender data and Seventh-day Adventist Leader data will be provided in separate data files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, Seventh-Day Adventist Church Oversample Attender Survey (Uploaded: 3/16/2015)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2)ómaking it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition).

This data file contains data for a random sample of Seventh-day Adventist worship Attenders participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 Seventh-day Adventist Profile data and Seventh-day Adventist Leader data will be provided in separate files.)

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1971 (Uploaded: 3/16/2015)

The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their sixties), middle-aged parents (then in their early forties), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file only contains the first wave in 1971.

Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2011 - Immigrant Ministries and Immigration Issues, All (Uploaded: 3/16/2015)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2011 survey focuses on Immigrant Ministries and Immigrant Issues within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). This dataset contains data from all sampled constituency groups.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2011 - Immigrant Ministries and Immigration Issues, Clergy (Uploaded: 3/16/2015)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2011 survey focuses on Immigrant Ministries and Immigrant Issues within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). This dataset contains data from sampled clergy.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2011 - Immigrant Ministries and Immigration Issues, Members and Elders (Uploaded: 3/16/2015)

The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2011 survey focuses on Immigrant Ministries and Immigrant Issues within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). This dataset contains data from all sampled members and elders.

National Poll on Social Capital (ENCAS) 2006 (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

The National Poll on Social Capital (ENCAS) is a survey developed by the Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL) and the United Nations Development Programme in Mexico (UNPD). The objective is to provide information about the social capital of Mexico. Social capital, referring to the norms and social networks that allow collective action, is presumed to be an element that allows greater action power for communities and leads to greater efficiency for public programs through the participation of the citizen in the search for a higher quality of life. For this reason SEDESOL developed a source of data that allows a better understanding of the magnitude of the relationship between social capital, social networks, and collective results.

This study was realized for the first time in 2006 in the urban regions (ENCAS 2006), and in 2011 rural regions were incorporated (ENCAS 2011).

Pre-Election American Values Survey, 2012 (Uploaded: 2/13/2015)

The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Instituteís annual multi-issue survey on religion, values and public policy. The survey is conducted each fall, and on election years includes both a pre-election and post-election survey.

The 2012 Pre-Election Survey focused heavily on religious change in America and the 2012 presidential election. The survey included questions that measured current and childhood religious affiliation. Questions covered a variety of topics including attitudes toward political leaders, and views about abortion, same-sex marriage the contraception mandate and immigration.