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  • U.S. Religion Census: Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2010 (County File):
    This study, designed and carried out by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), compiled data on the number of congregations and adherents for 236 religious groups in each county of the United States. Participants included 217 Christian denominations, associations, or communions (including Latter-day Saints, Messianic Jews, and Unitarian/Universalist groups); counts of Jain, Shinto, Sikh, Tao and National Spiritualist Association congregations, and counts of congregations and adherents from Bahá'ís, three Buddhist groupings, four Hindu groupings, four Jewish groupings, Muslims and Zoroastrians. The 236 groups reported a total of 344,894 congregations with 150,686,156 adherents, comprising 48.8 percent of the total U.S. population of 308,745,538 in 2010.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. ; The John Templeton Foundation ; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America ; North American Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 8/6/2012
  • U.S. Religion Census: Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2010 (State File):
    This study, designed and carried out by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), compiled data on the number of congregations and adherents for 236 religious groups in each county of the United States. Participants included 217 Christian denominations, associations, or communions (including Latter-day Saints, Messianic Jews, and Unitarian/Universalist groups); counts of Jain, Shinto, Sikh, Tao and National Spiritualist Association congregations, and counts of congregations and adherents from Bahá'ís, three Buddhist groupings, four Hindu groupings, four Jewish groupings, Muslims and Zoroastrians. The 236 groups reported a total of 344,894 congregations with 150,686,156 adherents, comprising 48.8 percent of the total U.S. population of 308,745,538 in 2010.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. ; The John Templeton Foundation ; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America ; North American Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 8/6/2012
  • U.S. Religion Census: Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2010 (Metro Area File):
    This study, designed and carried out by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), compiled data on the number of congregations and adherents for 236 religious groups in each county of the United States. Participants included 217 Christian denominations, associations, or communions (including Latter-day Saints, Messianic Jews, and Unitarian/Universalist groups); counts of Jain, Shinto, Sikh, Tao and National Spiritualist Association congregations, and counts of congregations and adherents from Bahá'ís, three Buddhist groupings, four Hindu groupings, four Jewish groupings, Muslims and Zoroastrians. The 236 groups reported a total of 344,894 congregations with 150,686,156 adherents, comprising 48.8 percent of the total U.S. population of 308,745,538 in 2010.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. ; The John Templeton Foundation ; Evangelical Lutheran Church in America ; North American Mission Board of the Southern Baptist Convention
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 8/6/2012
  • Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2000 (Counties File):
    This study, designed and completed by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), represents statistics for 149 religious bodies on the number of congregations within each county of the United States. Where available, also included are actual membership (as defined by the religious body) and total adherents figures. Participants included 149 Christian denominations, associations, or communions (including Latter-day Saints and Unitarian/Universalist groups); two specially defined groups of independent Christian churches; Jewish and Islamic totals; and counts of temples for six Eastern religions.

    It is important to understand the methodology producing these data and its limitations. While these data contain membership data for many religious groups in the United States, including most of the larger groups, they do not include every group. It is recommended that users read the notes below. Users may also want to refer to a paper by Roger Finke and Christopher P. Scheitle that explains the "adjusted" adherence rates included in the file.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment Inc. , Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies , Glenmary Home Missioners , Church of the Nazarene , American Baptist Churches in the USA , National Association of Free Will Baptists , Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) , United Church of Christ , Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 6/27/2006
  • Religious Congregations and Membership Study, 2000 (State File):
    This study, designed and completed by the Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies (ASARB), represents statistics for 149 religious bodies on the number of congregations within each county of the United States. Where available, also included are actual membership (as defined by the religious body) and total adherents figures. Participants included 149 Christian denominations, associations, or communions (including Latter-day Saints and Unitarian/Universalist groups); two specially defined groups of independent Christian churches; Jewish and Islamic totals; and counts of temples for six Eastern religions.

    It is important to understand the methodology producing these data and its limitations. While these data contain membership data for many religious groups in the United States, including most of the larger groups, they do not include every group. It is recommended that users read the notes below. Users may also want to refer to a paper by Roger Finke and Christopher P. Scheitle that explains the "adjusted" adherence rates included in the file.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment Inc. , Association of Statisticians of American Religious Bodies , Glenmary Home Missioners , Church of the Nazarene , American Baptist Churches in the USA , National Association of Free Will Baptists , Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) , United Church of Christ , Wisconsin Evangelical Lutheran Synod
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 6/27/2006
  • Salt Lake City and San Francisco Surveys of Mormons, 1967-1969 (Salt Lake City Sample):
    These are the first large-scale surveys of Mormons ever conducted, with or without church auspices, based upon probability samples of adult Mormon householders. As of century's end, these are the only such surveys available to the public, although the LDS Church has in recent years conducted many private surveys of its own for various purposes. Large as they are, the Mauss surveys cannot be considered representative of all Mormons everywhere, of course, even in the 1960s, but they are certainly representative of Salt Lake City Mormons then, as well as of the most highly urbanized San Francisco Mormons (and, by extension, perhaps of Mormons in similar sections of other American cities).

    The questionnaire and the survey procedures were modeled in large part after those of the Glock and Stark 1964 survey of Northern California churches (which did not include Mormons). Accordingly, the 23-page questionnaire includes many items intended to measure various dimensions of religiosity; the usual demographic and social class information; the conversion experience (for converts); religious defection and reactivation; civil liberties; and attitudes toward blacks and Jews.

    The nature and scope of these Mormon surveys, which used identical questionnaires, were intentionally guided by those of the Glock and Stark instrument and were carried out during the principal investigator's doctoral studies under Glock. The survey procedures in Salt Lake City were fairly straightforward and yielded data as representative for Mormons as the Glock and Stark survey was for Catholics and Protestants. However, the rationale for selecting the two Mormon wards in San Francisco, and none of the others, was that the Bay and the Mission Wards consisted disproportionately of the most "urbanized" church members (as opposed to suburban neighborhoods) -- that is, those closest to the inner-city, the apartment dwellers and the temporary residents. These two Mormon wards also included most of the ethnic minorities among Mormons in San Francisco (primarily Hispanic, Polynesian and Asian-Americans). The idea was to get as stark a contrast as possible to the Salt Lake City Mormons.
    Funded By: The Presiding Bishop's Office of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints provided informal sponsorship by "vouching for" the principal investigator in his efforts to obtain the necessary membership rolls from local bishops. No funds and no other forms of sponsorship were provided.
    Collected: 1969, Uploaded 5/3/1999
  • Salt Lake City and San Francisco Surveys of Mormons, 1967-1969 (San Francisco Sample):
    These are the first large-scale surveys of Mormons ever conducted, with or without church auspices, based upon probability samples of adult Mormon householders. As of century's end, these are the only such surveys available to the public, although the LDS Church has in recent years conducted many private surveys of its own for various purposes. Large as they are, the Mauss surveys cannot be considered representative of all Mormons everywhere, of course, even in the 1960s, but they are certainly representative of Salt Lake City Mormons then, as well as of the most highly urbanized San Francisco Mormons (and, by extension, perhaps of Mormons in similar sections of other American cities).

    The questionnaire and the survey procedures were modeled in large part after those of the Glock and Stark 1964 survey of Northern California churches (which did not include Mormons). Accordingly, the 23-page questionnaire includes many items intended to measure various dimensions of religiosity; the usual demographic and social class information; the conversion experience (for converts); religious defection and reactivation; civil liberties; and attitudes toward blacks and Jews.

    The nature and scope of these Mormon surveys, which used identical questionnaires, were intentionally guided by those of the Glock and Stark instrument and were carried out during the principal investigator's doctoral studies under Glock. The survey procedures in Salt Lake City were fairly straightforward and yielded data as representative for Mormons as the Glock and Stark survey was for Catholics and Protestants. However, the rationale for selecting the two Mormon wards in San Francisco, and none of the others, was that the Bay and the Mission Wards consisted disproportionately of the most "urbanized" church members (as opposed to suburban neighborhoods) -- that is, those closest to the inner-city, the apartment dwellers and the temporary residents. These two Mormon wards also included most of the ethnic minorities among Mormons in San Francisco (primarily Hispanic, Polynesian and Asian-Americans). The idea was to get as stark a contrast as possible to the Salt Lake City Mormons.
    Funded By: The Presiding Bishop's Office of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints provided informal sponsorship by "vouching for" the principal investigator in his efforts to obtain the necessary membership rolls from local bishops. No funds and no other forms of sponsorship were provided.
    Collected: 1969, Uploaded 5/3/1999
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ARDA Dictionary
  • Mormon:A member who belongs to a church in the Latter-day Saint Family. See Latter-day Saints Family for more.
  • Ward:A congregation in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) .
  • Stake:A regional association of Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) congregations or wards.
  • Latter-day Saints Family (Mormonism):A 19th century religious movement in America founded by Joseph Smith . The purpose of the movement is to restore New Testament Christianity. The Latter-day Saints' main authority is the Book of Mormon, along with a distinct translation of the Bible. Mormons moved westward from New York after religious persecution. Some of their distinct doctrinal views include: baptism for the dead, eternal marriage and the corporeality of God. They also refrain from tobacco, alcohol, and caffeine. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormon) , and the Community of Christ (formerly the Reorganized Church of Latter-day Saints) are the largest denominations in this family (Prothero 2008: 254-255).
  • Smith, Joseph (1805-1844):The founder and prophet of the Church of Latter-day Saints . He lived from 1805 to 1844, and wrote the Book of Mormon (1830). The Book of Mormon consists of revelations that he received from the angel Moroni. He also wrote Doctrine and Covenants (1835) and The Pearl of Great Price (1842) (Smith and Green 1995: 1006). He was killed by a mob on June 27, 1844 . For more information on Joseph Smith, click here .
  • Young, Brigham (1801-1877):Brigham Young succeeded Joseph Smith as Mormon president. He led the Mormon exodus to Utah and helped expand the church to 150,000 members. Young was one of the most influential leaders in Latter-day Saints history, although critics have noted his controversial history of plural marriage, ban on African-American priesthood, tacit support for slavery, and wars with the American government. For more information on Brigham Young, click here .
  • Book of Mormon:The sacred text of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) , along with the Bible. It is said that the angel Moroni led church founder Joseph Smith to golden plates in 1827. According to Smith, the angel gave him gold plates that were engraved in what Smith describes as a reformed Egyptian language. The angel also gave him two divining stones, the Urim and Thummim, which were used to translate the text. The Book of Mormon tells the story of two groups of people: the Jeradites and the Israelites. According to the story, both groups came to America, although at different times, and both groups were eventually destroyed, with Native Americans as the last remnants of the Israelites in America. In the book, Jesus visits the New World after his resurrection and before his ascension. These revelations were officially published in 1830. Smith also received other revelations, including the Book of Moses , the Book of Abraham , and an alternate translation of the Bible (Melton 2009: 635-636).
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