Jewish Values Survey 2012

Data Archive > U.S. Surveys > General Population > National > Public Religion Research Institute > Summary


The Jewish Values Survey examined the values, issues and political preferences of Jewish Americans. The survey included questions that explored views about religion and Jewish culture and traditions. The survey featured items to gauge views about foreign policy, Iran and Israel. The survey also covered voting behavior, economic inequality, immigration and social issues such as abortion and same-sex marriage.

Data File
Cases: 1,004
Variables: 273
Weight Variable: WEIGHT
The final weighting involved conforming (often called “raking”) the entire sample to overall population parameters derived from aggregated General Social Surveys (2000-2010) and the Pew Research Center’s Religious Landscape Survey. The data was raked, by form, to match population parameters for sex, age, race, education, region, metro status, household size and denomination. As a final step, extreme weights were trimmed to ensure that no respondent has too large an influence on overall results.

The sample raking was accomplished using Sample Balancing, a special iterative sample weighting program that simultaneously balances the distributions of all variables using a statistical technique called the Deming Algorithm. The use of these weights in statistical analysis ensures that the demographic characteristics of the sample closely approximate the demographic characteristics of the target population.
Data Collection
Date Collected: Feb. 23-March 5, 2012
Original Survey (Instrument)
Jewish Values Survey 2012
Funded By
The Nathan Cummings Foundation
Collection Procedures
The 2012 Jewish Values Survey was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute among a random sample of 1,004 self-identified Jewish adults (ages 18 and older) who are part of the Knowledge Networks’ KnowledgePanel. Interviews were conducted online between February 23 and March 5, 2012.
Sampling Procedures
The population of Jewish Americans was determined by using two separate screening questions that were designed to identify the Core Jewish Population, a category with a long history in Jewish demography, consisting of self-identifying Jews by religion (JBR) and persons who consider themselves Jewish (e.g., ethnically or culturally) but who claim no religion (JNR). For more information: http://publicreligion.org/research/2012/04/jewish-values-in-2012/
Principal Investigators
Robert P. Jones and Daniel Cox
Related Publications
The following link contains a summary of the Public Religion Research Institute’s findings of this survey: http://publicreligion.org/research/2012/04/jewish-values-in-2012/

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