Other National Surveys

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Measuring Morality Study, 2012 (Added: March 31, 2014)

The first phase of the Measuring Morality project involves fielding a nationally-representative survey of adults in the United States aimed at understanding the interrelations among moral constructs, and at exploring moral differences in the U.S. population. Survey items were chosen in consultation with an international group of scholars from sociology, psychology, and linguistics, and represent a wide range of theoretical traditions. The survey includes both morality scales (typically shortened for inclusion on the survey, and including several recently developed scales), and measures of constructs theoretically associated with morality.

American Time Use Survey, 2009 (Added: January 10, 2014)

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data file available for download from the ARDA combines two files from the 2009 ATUS: the Respondent file and the Activity summary file.

American Time Use Survey, 2010 (Added: January 10, 2014)

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data file available for download from the ARDA combines three files from the 2010 ATUS: the Respondent file, the Activity summary file and the Well-Being Module. Variables from the 2010 Well-Being Module have names that begin with the letter 'W.'

Note: The Bureau of Labor Statistics has reported that there was an error in the activity selection process for the 2010 Well-Being Module. Due to a programming error in the data collection software, certain activities were less likely than others to be selected for follow-up questions in the WB Module. As of October 2013, the Bureau of Labor Statistics and the Census Bureau were exploring ways to mitigate the error; more information on this error could be found at the following link: http://www.bls.gov/tus/wbnotice.htm.

American Time Use Survey, 2007 (Added: November 22, 2013)

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data file available for download from the ARDA combines three files from the 2007 ATUS: the Respondent file, the Activity summary file and the Eating & Health Module. Variables from the 2007 Eating & Health Module have names that begin with the letter 'E.'

American Time Use Survey, 2008 (Added: November 22, 2013)

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data file available for download from the ARDA combines three files from the 2008 ATUS: the Respondent file, the Activity summary file and the Eating & Health Module. Variables from the 2008 Eating & Health Module have names that begin with the letter 'E.'

American Time Use Survey, 2006 (Added: November 08, 2013)

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data file available for download from the ARDA combines three files from the 2006 ATUS: the Respondent file, the Activity summary file and the Eating & Health Module. Variables from the 2006 Eating & Health Module have names that begin with the letter 'E.'

American Time Use Survey, 2005 (Added: November 08, 2013)

The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau. The data file available for download from the ARDA combines two files from the 2005 ATUS: the Respondent file and the Activity summary file.

New Family Structures Survey (NFSS) (Added: June 07, 2013)

Knowledge Networks conducted the New Family Structures Survey on behalf of University of Texas at Austin. Specifically, the study examined the experiences of the respondents (ages 18-39) growing up in unconventional families where:

a. Parents are of the same sex (N=248)
b. Biologically unrelated parents adopted the respondent (N=210)
c. Parents were unmarried but cohabiting (N=657)
d. Biological mother had a romantic relationship with another man (N=52)
e. Biological mother did not have a romantic relationship with another man (N=122)

In addition, the survey also collected data among respondents who did not grow up in those unconventional families as a control/comparison group (N=1898).

The study seeks to understand how young adults (ages 18-39) raised by same-sex parents fare on a variety of social, emotional, and relational outcomes when compared with young adults raised in homes with their married biological parents, those raised with a step-parent, and those raised in homes with two adoptive parents. Questions on the survey cover a variety of topics including: parent-child relationship quality, romantic relationships, sexual orientation, public assistance, criminal activity, Facebook, bullying, charity, religious views, religious practices, life satisfaction, first sex, condom use, sexually transmitted diseases, rape, molestation, abortion, masturbation, suicide and alcohol use.

Religion and Deviance at Four American Universities (Added: March 19, 2012)

This dataset contains measures on religious belief and practice, Christian fundamentalist beliefs, religious context, and deviant behavior from students at four American universities. Two of these universities are public state schools; two are private and have religious affiliations. A total of 1,753 respondents were surveyed regarding their religious beliefs and practices, tattoos, piercings, and engagement in (or abstinence from) sexual intercourse, binge drinking, and marijuana use.

Faith Matters Survey, 2006 (Added: March 19, 2012)

The Faith Matters Survey was conducted on behalf of Harvard University by International Communications Research in the summer of 2006. The survey was generously funded by the John Templeton Foundation. The national survey interviewed roughly 3,100 Americans in an hour-long phone survey both about their religion (beliefs, belonging and behavior) and their social and political engagement. The data provided precise measurements of religious belief and behavior to help scholars determine their relative stability among different sub-populations and as compared to nonreligious beliefs and behaviors. Some variable names have been modified by the ARDA. Original variable names are in parentheses.

Attitudes of Cultural Progressive Activists, 2009 (Added: March 19, 2012)

The purpose of this research is to assess the attitudes of cultural progressive activists. Such individuals are conceptualized as individuals who oppose the political, and even religious ambitions of the 'Christian right.' Organizations that envision themselves as opponents of the Christian right were located and members of those organizations were sent a link to an online survey. This survey assessed the respondent’s attitudes toward the Christian right and their social networks.

National Survey of High School Biology Teachers (Added: March 18, 2011)

The National Survey of High School Biology Teachers is based on a nationally representative probability sample of U.S. public high school biology teachers. A total of 926 teachers completed questionnaires, either pencil and paper surveys or on the web, between March 1 and May 5 of 2007. Teachers responded to 86 questions pertaining to their educational backgrounds, teaching practices, and personal attitudes. The survey focused on respondents' approach to teaching evolution and creationism in the classroom. Teachers' personal views and understanding of evolution were examined, as well as potential outside influences on their teaching, such as parents, school board members, and religious leaders.

Social Capital Community Survey, 2006 (Added: October 22, 2010)

The 2006 Social Capital Community Survey was undertaken by the Saguaro Seminar at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. The SCCS consisted of a national sample and targeted samples in 22 American communities. The SCCS is a follow-up to the 2000 Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey, conducted nationally and in 41 American communities.

Social capital is the societal analogue of physical or economic capital -- the value inherent in friendship networks and other associations that individuals and groups can draw upon to achieve private or collective objectives. In recent years, the concept has received increasing attention as accumulating evidence demonstrates the independent relationship between social capital and a wide range of desirable outcomes: economic success, improved school performance, decreased crime, higher levels of voting and better health. Within communities, recent research supports the belief that social capital fosters norms of social trust and reciprocity, facilitating communal goals. The concept’s theoretical richness and practical significance is becoming increasingly well-documented.

For more information, visit the Saguaro Seminar website.

American Mosaic Project: A National Survey on Diversity (Added: October 22, 2010)

The American Mosaic Project is a multiyear, multi-method study of the bases of solidarity and diversity in American life. The principal investigators of this project are Doug Hartmann, Penny Edgell and Joseph Gerteis at the University of Minnesota. The survey portion of the project consists of a random-digit-dial telephone survey (N=2,081) conducted during the summer of 2003 by the University of Wisconsin Survey Center. The survey was designed to gather data on attitudes about race, religion, politics and American identity as well as demographic information and social networks.

Harris 1967 Survey on Catholics' View of their Church (Added: September 24, 2010)

This 1967 survey of a national sample of Catholic adults conducted for Newsweek Magazine focused on the changes within the Catholic Church since the Vatican Council II and attitudes of Catholics toward the changes and the Church in general. Questions include belief in various church teachings, attitudes toward priests and papal authority, church attendance, and birth control.

State of Disunion Survey, 1996 (Added: July 01, 2010)

The purpose of the 1996 Survey of American Political Culture was to assess the reality behind popular depictions of the declining legitimacy of American institutions and cultural fragmentation. Toward this end, a comprehensive questionnaire explores connections between political opinions and the cultural contexts within which they are formed. Topics include: the “Christian Right,” homosexuality, identity politics, visions of America's future, moral relativism, the role of government, political ideology, religious beliefs and activities, and a variety of lifestyle questions. What distinguishes this survey is its breadth and depth of coverage, both of which lend nuance to its findings. It was based upon over 2,000 face-to-face interviews and its summary report, The State of Disunion, is widely cited in publications and on the internet.

Life Choices, 1990 (Added: July 01, 2010)

The Life Choices Study was an in-depth study of Americans' beliefs and opinions on a variety of life-related issues, abortion being first and foremost among them. Additionally, euthanasia, capital punishment, and military service receive brief treatment. The survey attempts to penetrate the broader cultural currents underlying the polarizations and contradictions that characterize public opinion on these matters. The study was guided by the following questions: Why do people diverge so sharply in their views? Who are those that lie at the extremes and in the middle? What systems of moral reasoning anchor their opinions? Which appeals, arguments, and obligations have the greatest impact upon their views?

Politics of Character Survey, 2000 (Added: July 01, 2010)

Surveys on contemporary politics abound, but surveys of political culture, the underpinning of politics, are lacking. The Politics of Character survey attempts to bridge the gap between ephemeral opinion and enduring understandings of character, linking the latter to the moral communities to which American citizens belong. A principal finding is that understandings of character are vague and weakly grounded, and that “character” in politics is more importance rhetorically than practically. It is an ideal in search of substantive content.

Marital Instability Over the Life Course [United States]: A Five-Wave Panel Study, 1980, 1983, 1988, 1992-1994, 1997 (Added: May 21, 2010)

To examine the causes of marital instability throughout the life course, five waves of data were collected between 1980 and 1997 from married individuals who were between the ages of 18 and 55 in 1980. Information collected in 1980 (Wave I) focused on the effects of wives' participation in the labor force on marriage and marital instability. Measures predicting marital instability and divorce and assessing marital quality were developed. Variables include information on earnings, commitment to work, hours worked, and occupational status. The focus of Wave II, conducted in 1983, was to link changes in factors such as economic resources, wife's employment, presence of children, marital satisfaction, life goals, and health to actions intended to dissolve a marriage, such as divorce and permanent separation. Information on adjustment to marital dissolution, relationship with in-laws, size of home, parents' employment, use of free time, club membership, child-care arrangements, and responsibility for chores was gathered. Wave III, collected in 1988, further examined the impact of changes in employment, economics, and health on marital relationships. Questions were asked about divorce and remarriage, investment of energy and resource use in the care of aging parents and dependent offspring, asset value, awareness of aging, mental health issues, and history of disease. In 1992, a fourth wave of data was collected to look at changes in employment, economics, and health. Questions were asked about retirement issues, family structure, and the impact of caring for aging parents while at the same time caring for dependent offspring. Data were also collected in 1992 and 1994 from adult offspring who were living in the household in 1980 and had reached age 19 by 1992, thus providing parallel measures with their parents regarding the quality of parent-child relationships, attitudes, and support along with exploring the impact of childhood experiences on the transition to adult life. In 1997, the fifth wave was collected and interviews were conducted with a second sample of adult offspring (N=202) along with second interviews of offspring selected in 1992 (N=606). Wave 5 also examines the relationship between marital quality and stability and how it relates to changes in marital quality later in life. Among the variables included in all five waves are age, sex, educational attainment, marital status and history, attitude toward divorce, number of children, religious affiliation, and income level.

Lilly Survey of Attitudes and Social Networks (Added: May 01, 2009)

The Lilly Survey of Attitudes and Social Network (LSASN) was designed to assess individual attitudes, social networks, and involvement in the religious life of congregations. The survey was funded by a larger grant from the Lilly Endowment, Inc. to study multiracial congregations. The survey had ambitious aims in terms of content, experimental designs, and oversampling of African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Asian Americans. It probes respondents' racial and political attitudes and examines the racial composition of their social networks, including their religious congregations. The survey is notable for conducting the first national-level factorial telephone experiment designed to address the debate concerning neighborhood preferences by race (variable BUYHOME).

The data file available for download also contains 1990 and 2000 U.S. Census data for respondents' given zip codes. These data were merged in by the primary investigator and provide information on racial composition at the levels of tract, block, and zip code.

Carnegie Council National Surveys of Higher Education, Graduate Student Sample (1975) (Added: March 20, 2009)

In 1975 the Carnegie Council on Policy Studies in Higher Education commissioned the Survey Research Center at University of California, Berkeley to design and execute national surveys of faculty and students in colleges and universities throughout the United States. The objectives of the studies were both to identify any new developments in higher education that had transpired since the 1969 surveys, and to track any movement in trends or practices discovered in previous research. Additionally, the surveys were designed specifically to gather more information on a variety of new problems posed by emerging issues of affirmative action, the changing role of women, a changing job market for graduates, and new forms of academic governance.

Philanthropy Panel Study, 2001 (Added: July 23, 2007)

The Philanthropy Panel Study is the Philanthropy Module of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). The 2001 Panel contains data on the charitable giving and volunteering of 7,406 American families. The charitable giving data describe the giving done by the family unit as a whole. The volunteering data are separately available for both "Heads" and "Wives" (PSID terminology) in married and cohabiting families.

The charitable giving data include religious giving. The religious giving data-along with the religious affiliation data-make the Panel well-suited for the study of religious giving within the PSID's rich context of families' economic, social, health, and demographic circumstances. The 2001 Panel can be linked to the 2003 Panel providing the nation's only panel data on religious giving.

Philanthropy Panel Study, 2003 (Added: March 21, 2007)

The Philanthropy Panel Study is the Philanthropy Module of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). The 2003 Panel contains data on the charitable giving, volunteering, and religious service attendance of 7,822 American families. The charitable giving data describe the giving done by the family unit as a whole. The volunteering and attendance data are separately available for both “Heads” and “Wives” (PSID terminology) in married couples and co-habiting families. The Panel also contains a question about who in married couples makes decisions about charitable giving.

The charitable giving data include religious giving and the volunteering data include religious volunteering. The religious giving and volunteering data—along with the religious attendance and religious affiliation data—make the Panel well-suited for the study of important religious behaviors within the PSID’s rich context of families’ economic, social, health, and demographic circumstances.

Religion and Diversity Survey, 2002-2003 (Added: October 16, 2006)

This survey includes questions about the public's views about religious diversity, such as attitudes toward and contact with Muslims, Hindus, and Buddhists. The survey was designed by Robert Wuthnow at Princeton University in conjunction with the Responding to Diversity Project sponsored by the Lilly Endowment. The survey also includes questions regarding religious beliefs and practices, and opinions concerning terrorism, interreligious understanding, and national identity. (Religion and Diversity Codebook, Princeton University, Department of Sociology, 2003).

Faith and Family in America, 2005 (Added: August 31, 2006)

Over the last 50 years, our society has undergone huge demographic shifts with regards to family. Fewer people are living in a home with a married head of household, and family sizes have decreased as families have had fewer children and more people have chosen to raise children as single parents. Some religious institutions and leaders voice concerns about the decline of marriage, while others have embraced or at least accepted these changes. This debate polarizes our society, as some Americans are trying to mend what they see as cracks in the foundation of our society while others are seeking to move toward greater openness and tolerance. This study takes on these changes, exploring issues of family, marriage, and parenting in the context of America's religious life.

Marital Instability over the Life Course: A Five-Wave Panel Study, Wave I (1980) (Added: December 01, 2005)

This study describes data of individuals 55 years of age and under who were married in 1980. The goal of the study was to determine the impact of various factors that could affect the likelihood of divorce. Five waves were completed (1980, 1983, 1988, 1992-1994, and 1997). This particular dataset contains the 1980 wave. The 1980 survey focused on how wives’ participation in the workforce affected marital quality and stability. Religion variables in this wave include the religious affiliations of the respondent and spouse (if applicable), frequency of church attendance, and the degree to which religion influences the life of the respondent.

Arts and Religion Survey, 1999 (Added: March 30, 2005)

This data set offers information on Americans’ opinions about the role of the arts relative to religion. The study was designed by Princeton University professor Robert Wuthnow and conducted by the Gallup Organization in Princeton, New Jersey. Respondents were asked questions about their creative and arts-related activities, their attitudes toward the arts, their religious activities, behaviors, beliefs and affiliations, their spiritual (or “uplifting”) experiences, their attitudes toward religion and spirituality, and their involvement in charitable activities.

America's Evangelicals (Added: March 30, 2005)

As 23 percent of the American population, white evangelicals are an important part of the American mainstream whose collective voice is growing louder both in politics and in culture. In many respects, white evangelicals look like other Americans. They live all over the country, they are found in cities and small towns alike, they have friends outside of their churches, and a majority have at least some college education. They share concerns with the rest of the country about the cost of healthcare and having a secure retirement. Yet white evangelicals share a set of strongly-held beliefs about the role of religion in daily life, and they incorporate a set of religious behaviors based on these beliefs into their daily lives. It is these beliefs and behaviors that set them apart religiously and politically from the rest of the country. This study places white evangelicals in comparative perspective with mainline Protestants, Catholics, African Americans, and Hispanics.

Carnegie Foundation National Survey of Higher Education, Faculty Sample (1975) (Added: May 05, 2004)

In 1975 the Carnegie Council on Policy Studies in Higher Education commissioned the Survey Research Center at University of California, Berkeley to design and execute national surveys of faculty and students in colleges and universities throughout the United States. The objectives of the studies were both to identify any new developments in higher education that had transpired since the 1969 surveys, and to track any movement in trends or practices discovered in previous research. Additionally the surveys were designed specifically to gather more information on a variety of new problems posed by emerging issues of affirmative action, the changing role of women, a changing job market for graduates, and new forms of academic governance.

Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey, 2000 (Added: May 05, 2004)

The 2000 Social Capital Benchmark Survey was undertaken by the Saguaro Seminar at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard Unversity. This purpose of the SCCBS, conducted nationally as well as in 41 U.S. communities, is to measure various manifestations of social capital as well as its suspected correlates to (1) provide a rich database for analysis by interested researchers who wish to better understand social capital and (2) provide a tool for communities and organizations to use in program development and evaluation, in part, by enabling relative assessment to other communities and the nation. As a “benchmark” survey, it is the first attempt at widespread systematic measurement of social capital, especially within communities, and it will serve as a point of comparison for future research which attempts to assess changes in key indicators. It is hoped that discussion and use of the survey will also stimulate interest in the broader purpose of fostering civic and social engagement across the country and thus contribute to the revitalization of community institutions.

The survey developed 11 dimensions of social capital for which there are indices including one on religion. The survey also contains 11 measures of religiosity: 1) the respondent's religion (if any) and denomination; 2) how important religion is to the respondent; 3) whether respondent is a member of a religious group; 4) frequency of religious attendance; 5) religious participation, outside of weekly services; 6) level of religious volunteering; 7) level of religious giving; 8) trust of co-congregants; 9) whether respondent has a personal friend of a different religion; 10) degree to which house of worship gives respondent a sense of belonging; 11) whether respondent is an active member in a religious group (other than his/her house of worship).

For more information, visit the SCCBS website.

Religion and Politics Survey, 2000 (Added: April 24, 2002)

The religion and politics survey is part of the larger Public Role of Mainline Protestantism Project, which is coordinated through Princeton University's Survey Research Center. The survey addresses respondents' views on political, social, and religious issues, their political actions, beliefs, and affiliations, and their religious actions, beliefs, and affiliations.

Economic Values Survey, 1992 (Added: April 24, 2002)

This is a survey of participants in the U.S. labor force. Nearly 100 social scientists, religion specialists and historians were asked to solicit topics to be included in the survey. "This sample is intended to be representative of the active labor force age eighteen and over living in the continental United States" (Wuthnow 1994, 270).

Winthrop University Student Religion Survey, 1996 (Added: May 01, 2001)

This study was designed by the principal investigator and his students in an upper-division sociology of religion course. The survey items were formulated around key issues in class and administered to Winthrop University students in General Education classes. The topics covered include religious background and behavior, spiritual beliefs, and attitudes toward deviant religious groups.

Civic Involvement Survey, 1997 (Added: March 22, 2001)

This survey provides data on the level and types of civic involvement of a nationally representative sample of American adults. Extensive questions about respondents' religious activities and beliefs are also included in the survey. The results were originally intended as a comparison to qualitative in-depth interviews with a different sample of respondents (qualitative interviews not available).

Carnegie Foundation National Survey of Higher Education, Faculty Sample (1984) (Added: December 12, 2000)

In 1984 the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching commissioned Opinion Research Corporation to design and execute national surveys of faculty and undergraduates in colleges and universities throughout the United States. The objectives of the studies were both to identify any new developments in higher education that had transpired since the 1975 1976 surveys, and to track any movement in trends or practices discovered in previous research. Additionally the surveys were planned to complement other research efforts being sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation.

Williamsburg Charter Survey On Religion and Public Life, 1987 (Added: June 29, 2000)

"On the eve of the bicentennial of the Bill of Rights, it is plain that controversies about religion in public life are as lively and potent today as when the First Amendment was being debated nearly 200 years ago. But how do the American people view the place of religion in public life today? Is there a vital knowledge of the Constitution? Where do Americans currently draw the line between church and state: Are there significant limits to tolerance? To answer such questions and help assess the state of the union regarding religion and public life, the Williamsburg Charter Foundation commissioned a nationwide opinion survey...to learn how people view these issues 200 years into the American Experiment" (The Williamsburg Charter Survey on Religion and Public Life 1988).

Survey On the Beliefs and Moral Values of America's Children, 1989 (Added: June 29, 2000)

Convinced that the beliefs and moral values of children are important in their own right and that children's voices need to become part of the larger public discussion of America's future, the Girl Scouts of the USA, in partnership with the Lilly Endowment, Inc. and the C.S. Mott Foundation, commissioned child psychiatrist Robert Coles of Harvard University, sociologist James Davison Hunter of the University of Virginia, public opinion researcher Louis Harris of Louis Harris and Associates, Inc., and John Seel of the Williamsburg Charter Foundation to conduct a nationwide survey of children's beliefs and moral values. The purpose of the study was to explore the range of children's beliefs and moral values and the consequences in their lives. Questions asked include: Who are the adults with the most influence on the children's moral commitments? What are the moral bearings directing their decision-making in practice? What are the pressures children face as adolescents and young adults? What are the moral judgments they make in the face of difficult everyday situations? How do they view the choices concerning their own futures and the responsibilities of citizenship as they approach adulthood?

Small Groups Survey, 1991 (Groups Sample) (Added: June 29, 2000)

This national survey was part of a three-year research project conducted to understand the small-group movement. "The national survey screened a representative sample of the American public to identify persons who were currently involved in any small group that met regularly and provided caring and support for its members. This procedure yielded approximately 1,000 people who were asked a long list of questions about the nature of their group, why they became involved, what its activities were, how well they liked it, and what they had received from it. For comparative purposes, we also surveyed more than 900 people to find out why they had not become involved in a small group" (Wuthnow, 1994:9).This data file is the first part of the national survey on small groups and contains the sample of those involved in small group activity. The sample containing those not involved in small groups is also available through The ARDA as "SMGRP2."

Small Groups Survey, 1991 (Individuals Not in Groups Sample) (Added: June 29, 2000)

This national survey was part of a three-year research project conducted to understand the small-group movement. "The national survey screened a representative sample of the American public to identify persons who were currently involved in any small group that met regularly and provided caring and support for its members. This procedure yielded approximately 1,000 people who were asked a long list of questions about the nature of their group, why they became involved, what its activities were, how well they liked it, and what they had received from it. For comparative purposes, we also surveyed more than 900 people to find out why they had not become involved in a small group" (Wuthnow, 1994:9).
This data file is the second part of the national survey on small groups and contains a comparative sample of those not involved in small group activity. The sample containing those involved in small groups is also available through The ARDA as "SMGRP1."

American Jewish Committee Religious Right Survey, 1996 (Added: November 11, 1999)

The 1996 American Jewish Committee Religious Right Survey was designed by the American Jewish Committee and the Gallup International Institute with advice from academic experts (John Green, Ohio State University; Chris Smith, University of North Carolina; and Tom W. Smith, National Opinion Research Center, University of Chicago). The purpose of this study was to gauge and compare the social and political views of the Religious Right with the larger U.S. population. The Survey was conducted during May and June, 1996, under the direction of the Gallup International Institute, using a random sample of telephone numbers. The survey consists of 2 parts: a cross-sectional sample of 572 respondents and an oversample of aligners with the Religious Right of 438. Combined with the 69 aligners from the cross-sectional sample this produces a total sample of 507 Religious Right aligners and 503 other Americans.

Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Youth Component (Added: October 19, 1999)

The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different, 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and on behavior.

Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Father Component (Added: October 19, 1999)

The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and on behavior

Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Mother Component (Added: October 19, 1999)

The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and behavior

Spirituality and the Elderly: Survey of Staff and Residents From Long-Term Care Facilities, 1998 (Added: March 31, 1999)

"This study compared staff and resident knowledge, attitudes and practices related to religious expression in long-term care settings. Staff and residents from 13 facilities and organizations providing services to long-term care staff completed a survey related to religion and spirituality in long-term care" (Walker et al. August 1998).

Indiana Mainline Churches, 1986 (Added: October 27, 1998)

The original study was designed to examine church finances and membership trends. Six important conclusions arose from these findings: 1) Congregations that emphasize growth and evangelism can grow (or at least slow their decline), but only 37 percent of the mostly mainline churches in this study emphasize growth; 2) If churches want to grow, they need to have an openness to change and an orientation to serving the needs of people outside the local congregation rather than just the needs of current members; 3) Emphasizing social action programs may limit growth somewhat, but this is not a cause of denominational decline for mainline denominations, since only 8 percent of these churches have such an emphasis; 4) As in previous studies (e.g., Hoge and Roozen 1979), membership trends are heavily influenced by community population trends. However, the influence of demographic factors declined during the 1980s in Indiana because there was less variation in population growth rates among Indiana communities; 5) The growth rates of small churches and churches in smaller communities are less affected by community population changes than are the growth rates of large churches and churches in larger communities; 6) Denominational differences in growth rates are major, but are not explainable using the variables contained in this study.

A Survey of Graduate Ministry Programs, 1992-1993 (Added: August 05, 1998)

This project was designed to provide a profile of graduate programs in ministry throughout the United States and to offer practical information for directors and administrators of these programs to use for their long- and short-range planning.

National Survey of the Religious Life Futures Project, 1990 (Added: February 27, 1998)

"The National Survey component of the Religious Life Futures Project had two purposes: to collect information concerning the beliefs, values and practices of members of religious orders regarding their personal, spiritual, community and ministerial life and to establish a significant data base for the study of religious life on the individual, congregational and social institution levels. The National Survey was also the primary method of measuring perceptions of the future of religious life in the total population of sisters, brothers and religious priests." (Nygren & Ukeritis, 1993: 99)

Four-State Church Involvement Study, 1988 (Added: February 20, 1998)

The Four-State Church Involvement Study investigates the role of individualism as it pertains to church involvement and what that involvement means. Regional variations in these relationships also are examined.