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Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS101 Lee, Cultural Affinities, Regime Type, and Foreign Policy Opinion Formation (Added: September 19, 2014)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

This experiment explores the role of region-specific cultural biases on individual citizens’ perceptions of security threats and seeks to disentangle this effect from the impact of knowledge of regime type. In two different scenarios, the type of government of a given country (democratic/non-democratic) and the religion of a given group (Christianity/Islam/Hinduism) are rotated for each experimental condition (six total conditions, two different scenarios). Respondent’s assignment to versions of the two scenarios is independent. In other words, there are two separate randomizations to one of six conditions, one for each scenario. The first scenario (Scenario A) deals with an international terrorist organization and the second scenario (Scenario B) deals with a foreign country developing nuclear weapons.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS73 Djupe, The Political Impact of Message Attributes from Religious Elites (Added: September 19, 2014)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

The study focuses on the affect religious attributes may have on messages about global warming. Respondents will receive information about 1) the religious affiliation of a public official and 2) the way he made his decision to take a stance on global warming. This is a 2x2 between subject design, where the first factor is the source cue (Present/Absent) and the second factor is the decision process (Present/Absent). In total, there are four conditions and respondents are assigned with equal probabilities.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS16 Glazier, Providential Religious Beliefs and U.S. Foreign Policy (Added: September 19, 2014)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

This study uses a 2X3 experimental study design to examine how religious frames of natural disasters and political crises may influence the support for government intervention. There are a total of six experimental conditions. The first three experimental conditions deal with a hypothetical foreign policy speech regarding government intervention in a foreign natural disaster. One condition is unframed, another condition frames it as a responsibility to international agreement, and the last condition frames the issue as a religious duty as a blessed nation. Another set of three conditions deal with a hypothetical foreign policy speech regarding government intervention in a foreign political crisis. One condition is unframed, another condition frames it as a responsibility to international agreement, and the last condition frames the issue as a religious duty as a blessed nation. Through this experiment, we can examine the effects of civil religion.

Religious Freedom in the Courts, 1981-1997 (Added: September 06, 2013)

The Religious Freedom data are derived from a content analysis of the The Religious Freedom Reporter (the Reporter), which is a journal published monthly by the Church-State Resource Center of the Norman Adrian Wiggins School of Law, Campbell University. The journal dates back to January 1981 and, as stated in the introductory preface to each issue, “seeks to provide comprehensive coverage of pending and decided cases, new legislation and regulations, law review articles and other resources related to religious freedom.” The Reporter includes information from all levels of the judiciary. The dataset has information on type of case (e.g., free exercise, first amendment and establishment), when the case was decided, level of court and the religion of the group or person who brought the case forward.

The Gravestone Index (Added: August 12, 2011)

This file is a record of the religious and secular information found on headstones and tombstones in the United States, Canada, Britain, and Australia. The death dates on the grave markers cover the period from the early 19th century to the early 21st century. Also included is a record of carvings, statues, and other objects connected to the front or back of the grave markers.

Christian Nonprofit Organizations, 2005 (Added: February 21, 2011)

These data represent almost 2,000 of the largest parachurch Christian nonprofit organizations based in the United States. The data were built using forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service in 2005. Variables include measures of revenue, expenses, activities and religious identity as measured by the organization’s statement of purpose.

Lesbian Christian Identity (Added: August 13, 2010)

The purpose of the study is to explore and distinguish identity management strategies used by lesbian Christians. The strategies were informed by Erving Goffman's book, Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity. Based on his work, six different scales were created: normalization, passing, ambivalence, superiority, minstrelization, and group affiliation. Additionally, a measure of evangelical Christian identity was created using church affiliations, self-identification as an evangelical, and beliefs consonant with evangelicalism. The creation of the evangelical identity indicator is explained in the JSSR article. The article cites other variables created through the coding of responses to open-ended questions. These variables include: the source of dissonance between religious beliefs and sexuality as well as resolution strategies for the dissonance. Some variables have been recoded to protect the respondents' identities.

Metropolitan Area Religious Ecology, 1980 (Added: June 12, 2009)

This dataset was created for the research reported in two articles by William S. Bainbridge entitled "The Religious Ecology of Deviance" in American Sociological Review and "Explaining Church Member Rate" in Social Forces. This dataset contains information about religious membership, population and deviant activity in 289 metropolitan statistical areas. The data come from the U.S. Census Bureau as well as a variety of publications on behaviors deemed "deviant."

Religious Ecology of 378 American Cities, 1906-1936 (Added: June 12, 2009)

This dataset was created for the research reported in Religion, Deviance and Social Control by Rodney Stark and William Sims Bainbridge (1996). This dataset compiles information regarding the religious composition of 378 cities in the United States from 1906 to 1936 and contains observations on church membership, growth and suicide rates.

Content Analysis of the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion, 1999 (Added: August 27, 2002)

The purpose of this study was to conduct a content analysis of the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion. The research was carried out in 1999 and examined all articles and research notes from the journal's inception in 1961 through 1998. It analyzed major trends in methods, topics, theoretical frameworks, author characteristics, and editor characteristics, as well as other important traits. The study also looked at the journal's impact on the socio-scientific study of religion.