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Religion and Politics Survey, November 2011 (Added: December 14, 2012)

The November 2011 Religion and Politics Survey, sponsored by the Pew Research Center, obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 2,001 adults living in the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. The survey focused on Americans' views of Barack Obama and the major Republican presidential candidates. Items also included views on global warming, the death penalty, abortion, and Mormonism, as well as several measures of respondents' religious and political preferences and behavior.

Faith in Flux: Changes in Religious Affiliation in the U.S. (Added: September 02, 2011)

The 2008 Conversion Recontact Survey, conducted by the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life, is a follow-up to the 2007 “U.S. Religious Landscape Survey.” One of the most striking findings from the Landscape Survey was the large number of people who have left their childhood faith. The Landscape Survey found that more than one in four American adults (28%) have changed their religious affiliation from that in which they were raised. This number includes people who have changed from one major religious tradition to another, for instance, from Protestantism to Catholicism or from Judaism to no religion. If change within religious traditions is included (e.g., from one Protestant denominational family to another), the survey found that roughly 44% of Americans now profess a religious affiliation different from that in which they were raised.

The Conversion Recontact Survey is designed to offer a fuller picture of this churn within American religion, with a special focus on the reasons that people change religious affiliation. The Conversion Recontact Survey is based on follow-up interviews with Landscape Survey respondents, including those from the largest segments of the population that have changed religious affiliation as well as those who still belong to the religious faith in which they were raised. Interviews were conducted by telephone with a nationally representative sample of 2,867 adults living in continental United States telephone households. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International (PSRAI). Interviews were conducted on landline telephones in English and Spanish by Princeton Data Source (PDS), LLC from Oct. 3 to Nov. 7, 2008. Statistical results are weighted to correct known demographic discrepancies. A full report on the survey’s findings, “Faith in Flux: Changes in Religious Affiliation in the U.S.,” is available on the Pew Forum’s website.

U.S. Religious Knowledge Study, 2010 (Added: September 02, 2011)

In his 2007 book, Religious Literacy: What Every American Needs to Know – And Doesn’t, Boston University professor Stephen Prothero wrote that “Americans are both deeply religious and profoundly ignorant about religion.” To support his contention, Prothero offered many compelling anecdotes and some isolated findings from public opinion polls. He also cited a few studies about the extent of biblical literacy among young people. But, as he discovered, there was no comprehensive, national survey assessing the general state of religious knowledge among U.S. adults.

To address this gap, the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life set out to gauge what Americans know about their own faiths and about other religions. The resulting survey covered a wide range of topics, including the beliefs and practices of major religious traditions as well as the role of religion in American history and public life. (Preface)

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2010 (Added: April 25, 2011)

The survey is a joint effort of the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. Conducted in July and August of 2010, it examined Americans' attitudes toward a wide range of topics related to religion and public life. Special topics included Barack Obama's religion, the religious right and left, the Tea Party movement, immigration, same-sex marriage, and the influence of religion in politics. The survey also contained a range of items on respondents' religious and political preferences and behavior.

Sub-Saharan Africa Religion Survey, 2010 (Added: January 21, 2011)

“The vast majority of people in many sub-Saharan African nations are deeply committed to the practices and major tenets of one or the other of the world’s two largest religions, Christianity and Islam. Large majorities say they belong to one of these faiths, and, in sharp contrast with Europe and the United States, very few people are religiously unaffiliated. Despite the dominance of Christianity and Islam, traditional African religious beliefs and practices have not disappeared. Rather, they coexist with Islam and Christianity. Whether or not this entails some theological tension, it is a reality in people’s lives: Large numbers of Africans actively participate in Christianity or Islam yet also believe in witchcraft, evil spirits, sacrifices to ancestors, traditional religious healers, reincarnation and other elements of traditional African
religions.”

Explore “key findings from more than 25,000 face-to-face interviews conducted on behalf of the Pew Research Center’s Forum on Religion & Public Life in more than 60 languages or dialects in 19 sub-Saharan African nations from December 2008 to April 2009. […] The countries were selected to span this vast geographical region and to reflect different colonial histories, linguistic backgrounds and religious compositions. In total, the countries surveyed contain three-quarters of the total population of sub-Saharan Africa.” (Full Report)

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2009 (Added: December 03, 2010)

This project investigated the public’s attitudes on religion and public life. Interviewers asked questions on a variety of topics, including political views, attitudes towards different religions, religious discrimination and government funding of religious social service program.

The survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and conducted in two waves (Survey A and Survey B). In Survey A, telephone interviews were conducted with a nationally representative sample of 2,010 adults living in the continental United States between August 11 and August 17, 2009. In Survey B, telephone surveys were conducted with 2,003 adults between August 20 and August 27, 2009.

The survey was conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research International. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish at Princeton Data Source, LLC. Statistical results are weighted to correct known demographic discrepancies. The margin of sampling error for the complete set of weighted data is ± 2.7% and ±1.9% for Surveys A and B respectively. Details on the design, execution and analysis of the survey are discussed below.

Sources: “Methodology: 2009 Religion and Public Life Survey A" and "Methodology: 2009 Religion and Public Life Survey B," prepared by Princeton Survey Research Associates International for the Pew Research Center for the People and Press, August 2009.

Trends in Political Values and Core Attitudes, 1987-2009 (Added: September 03, 2010)

The values study by the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press is an effort to better understand the nature of American politics by tracking a broad range of beliefs and values that shape public opinion and ultimately influence voting behavior. The project began in 1987, and has been updated 13 times over the past 22 years. The values study asks respondents whether they agree or disagree with a series of approximately eighty statements covering core beliefs about government, business, religion and several other topics.

(From the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press report "Independents Take Center Stage in Obama Era: Trends in Political Values and Core Attitudes: 1987-2009," available here)

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2008 (Added: May 21, 2010)

This project investigated the public’s attitudes on religion and public life. This survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced two reports. The first report is titled “GOP Base Getting Behind McCain: The Presidential Race Draws Even," and the second report is titled “Some Social Conservative Disillusionment: More Americans Question Religion's Role in Politics." Many of the questions in this survey investigated views on the 2008 presidential election and probed the dynamics of support for John McCain and Barack Obama. In addition, this survey asked questions on a variety of topics including: public leaders and religion, political parties and religion, government funding for religious social services, universal health care, abortion, gay marriage, attitudes towards religious groups, and other topics.

U.S. Religious Landscape Survey - Alaska and Hawaii Dataset (Added: January 27, 2010)

The Alaska and Hawaii Supplement to the U.S. Religious Landscape Survey obtained telephone interviews with representative samples of 200 adults living in Alaska and 201 adults living in Hawaii. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research International. Interviews were done in English by Princeton Data Source, LLC from March 13 to March 30, 2008. Statistical results are weighted to correct known demographic discrepancies. The margin of sampling error is ±7.5 percentage points for results based on Alaska respondents and ±8.5 percentage points for results based on Hawaii respondents.

Information on this page was adapted from the Pew Forum's methodology report for this survey.

U.S. Religious Landscape Survey - Continental Dataset (Added: January 27, 2010)

The U.S. Religious Landscape Survey completed telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 35,556 adults living in continental United States households. The survey was conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International (PSRAI). This extensive survey by the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life details the religious makeup, religious beliefs and practices as well as social and political attitudes of the American public.

Information on this page was adapted from the Pew Forum's methodology report for this survey.

Changing Faiths: Latinos and the Transformation of American Religion (Added: December 14, 2009)

In order to explore the complex nature of religion among Latinos, the Pew Hispanic Center and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life collaborated on a set of public opinion surveys. Bilingual telephone interviewing for the Primary Survey was conducted from August 10, 2006 to October 4, 2006, and produced a nationally representative sample of 4,016 Latino respondents age 18 and older. The margin of error for this sample is 2.5% at the 95% confidence level.

Between January 5, 2007 and January 29, 2007, 650 of the Catholic respondents from the Primary Survey were recontacted. This Recontact Survey produced a sample representative of the 2,025 Catholic respondents first interviewed in the Primary Survey, with a margin of error of 5.7%.

Results of both surveys are combined into one SPSS dataset.

Muslim American Survey, 2007 (Added: November 16, 2009)

In 2007, the Pew Research Center conducted what is believed to be the first-ever national telephone survey of a probability sample of Muslim Americans, a rare, dispersed, and highly diverse population. The study examined the political and social values, religious beliefs and practices, and life experiences of Muslims living in the U.S. today. The survey also contrasts the views of the Muslim population as a whole with those of the U.S. general population, and with the attitudes of Muslims all around the world, including Western Europe. Finally, findings from the survey make important contributions to the debate over the total size of the Muslim American population.

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2007 (Added: February 06, 2009)

This project investigated the public’s attitudes on religion and public life. This survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced two reports. The first is titled “Clinton and Giuliani Seen as Not Highly Religious; Romney's Religion Raises Concerns”, and the second is titled “Public Expresses Mixed Views of Islam, Mormonism”. This survey asked questions on a variety of topics including: public leaders and religion, political parties and religion, abortion, stem cell research, universal health care, the death penalty, gay marriage, attitudes towards religious groups, attitudes towards Muslims and Mormons, and many other topics.

December 2006 Values Update Survey (Added: July 21, 2008)

The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press sponsored the nationally representative December 2006 Values Update Survey to gather public opinion on a variety of social issues. Specifically, this survey focuses on the public's opinions on Presidential and government performance, politics, economic issues, and domestic and foreign policy.

Generation Next Survey, 2006 (Added: July 01, 2008)

Featuring an oversample of members of "Generation Next" (young adults ages 18-25), this Pew survey examines this generation's outlook, lifestyle, and politics. Respondents were asked to compare their own generation to others in several areas including opportunities, challenges, and lifestyle choices. Other topics covered include technology usage, news consumption, political attitudes and behavior, and personal aspirations. Religion variables include religious affiliation, church attendance, and the importance of spirituality.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in South Korea (Added: June 13, 2008)

This file of respondents in South Korea is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in South Korea were conducted by the research firm Gallup Korea, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in the United States (Added: June 13, 2008)

This file of respondents in the United States is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in the United States were conducted by Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in South Africa (Added: June 13, 2008)

This file of respondents in South Africa is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in South Africa were conducted by the research firm Markinor, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Chosen Regions of India (Added: June 13, 2008)

This file of respondents in the chosen regions of India is part of a multi-country survey. This project in India includes a probability sample of disproportionately Christian districts of three states of India—Tamil Nadu, Kerala and Meghalaya. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in the chosen regions of India were conducted by the research firm TNS India, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample. Note that this is not a representative sample of India.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in the Philippines (Added: June 13, 2008)

This file of respondents in the Philippines is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in the Philippines were conducted by the research firm TNS Philippines, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Guatemala (Added: May 19, 2008)

This file of respondents in Guatemala is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., pentecostals and charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in Guatemala were conducted by the research firm MERCAPLAN, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Chile (Added: May 19, 2008)

This file of respondents in Chile is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in Chile were conducted by the research firm, MORI Chile, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Nigeria (Added: May 19, 2008)

This file of respondents in Nigeria is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in Nigeria were conducted by Research International Nigeria under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Brazil (Added: May 19, 2008)

This file of respondents in Brazil is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in Brazil were conducted by the research firm, Research International Brazil, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Spirit and Power: Survey of Pentecostals in Kenya (Added: May 19, 2008)

This file of respondents in Kenya is part of a multi-country survey. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. An aggregate file of all ten nations of this multi-country survey is available at the ARDA. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists, to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys in Kenya were conducted by the research firm, Research Path Associates, under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample.

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2005 (Added: May 09, 2008)

This project investigated the public’s attitudes on religion and public life. This survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced three reports with the following titles: “Religion A Strength And Weakness For Both Parties," “Abortion and Rights of Terror Suspects Top Court Issues”, and “Views of Muslim-Americans Hold Steady After London Bombings.” This survey asked questions on a variety of topics including: evolution, contrasting political party images, promoting democracy, faith-based aid, stem cell research, euthanasia, gays in the military, global conflict, support for Israel, and many other topics.

Spirit and Power: A 10-Country Survey of Pentecostals (Added: April 23, 2008)

This multi-country survey was commissioned by the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life to investigate the religious, political, and civic views of renewalists (i.e., Pentecostals and Charismatics) around the world. The project includes surveys in ten countries with sizeable renewalist populations: the United States; Brazil, Chile and Guatemala in Latin America; Kenya, Nigeria and South Africa in Africa; and India, the Philippines and South Korea in Asia. In each country, surveys were conducted among a random sample of the general public, with an oversample of renewalists to yield sufficient sample sizes for analysis. Surveys were conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates International. The codebook reflects the results of the general public sample in each country.

Campaign 2000 Typology Survey (Added: December 19, 2007)

The Campaign 2000 Typology Survey investigated Americans' opinions on a variety of topics, including the 2000 Presidential election and candidates, the major political parties, and various social groups. The survey also included a rich set of questions on religion and politics, covering topics such as whether churches and clergy should express political views and whether religious groups should receive government funding to provide social services. The data set features a 10-group Political Typology (variable 160) which sorts respondents into homogeneous groups based on their values, political beliefs, and party affiliation.

News Interest Index / Religion Overflow, July 2005 (Added: December 03, 2007)

This survey investigates respondents’ opinions concerning a variety of issues in the news during the summer of 2005, such as the Supreme Court vacancy, the Iraq war, and Karl Rove. The survey also asks individuals their views on topics like abortion, stem cell research, and gay marriage. Several religion variables are included, such as attendance at religious services and religious affiliation.

The Right to Die II, November 2005 (Added: November 07, 2007)

This survey investigated Americans' opinions on end-of-life issues including euthanasia, decisions over stoppage of treatment, wills, and more. Religious variables include religious affiliation, church attendance, subjective importance of religion, and whether clergy at respondents' churches speak out on public issues, including end-of-life issues. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press.

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2006 (Added: November 07, 2007)

This project investigated the public’s attitudes on religion and public life. This survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced two reports. The first is titled “Pragmatic Americans Liberal and Conservative on Social Issues,” and the second is titled “Many Americans Uneasy with Mix of Religion and Politics.” This survey asked questions on a variety of topics including: church and state, evolution, global warming, political parties and religion, Biblical prophecy and Israel, abortion, birth control, stem cell research, gay marriage and adoption, and many other topics.

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2004 (Added: August 31, 2007)

This survey investigates respondents’ opinions concerning a variety of recent issues covered by news media, such as anticipated votes in the 2004 presidential election, foreign policy attitudes, and especially the personal attributes and actions of John Kerry and President George W. Bush. The survey also asks the extent to which respondents have followed recent topics in news media, including, but not limited to: Iraq, terrorism, the Democratic convention, the price of gasoline, the “code orange” alert, abortion, the federal budget deficit, energy, health care, stem cell research, education, the environment, respect for America, and the 9-11 Commission.

The Religion and Public Life Survey, 2004, sponsored by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press (PRC), obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,512 adults living in continental United States telephone households. The interviews were conducted in English by Princeton Data Source, LLC from August 5 to August 10, 2004. Statistical results are weighted to correct known demographic discrepancies. The margin of sampling error for the complete set of weighted data is ±3%. Details on the design, execution and analysis of the survey are discussed below. Note: This file was previously listed on the ARDA as the News Interest Index, August 2004.

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2003 (Added: April 25, 2007)

“Religion is a critical factor these days in the public's thinking about contentious policy issues and political matters. An increasing number of Americans have come to view Islam as a religion that encourages violence while a declining number say Islam has a lot in common with their own religion. The public remains divided over whether churches should stay out of politics, even as large numbers say they are comfortable with expressions of faith by political leaders. There also is evidence that next year's presidential vote may again provoke deep religious divisions over social issues, especially homosexual marriage” (Pew Forum). This survey was conducted by The Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life.

News Interest Index, October 2003 (Added: April 23, 2007)

This survey addresses respondents’ opinions regarding various issues (especially homosexual issues and the situation in Iraq) recently in news media. Questions cover opinions and views regarding both gay marriage and civil unions and whether or not clergy at the respondents’ religious congregation discuss issues such as: current elections, the situation in Iraq and laws regarding homosexuals. Respondents give open-ended responses about homosexuality, including whether or not they have a friend or acquaintance that is gay. Furthermore, this study investigates views on job availability, the effects of President George W. Bush’s economic policies, and the situation in Iraq (e.g., media coverage and what should be done there). This survey also asks detailed questions regarding where the respondent gets national and international news and information (e.g., magazines, newspapers, radio, internet, TV, local news programming, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, etc.).

News Interest Index, March 2004 (Added: April 23, 2007)

This survey investigates respondents’ opinions concerning a variety of recent issues covered by news media, such as: the 2004 presidential election, the personal attributes and actions of John Kerry and President George W. Bush, news sources for the election, effects of recent tax cuts, and a possible Constitutional amendment on gay marriage. The survey also asks the extent to which respondents have followed recent topics in news media (i.e., Mel Gibson’s film, Martha Stewart, Iraq, bombings in Madrid, etc.).

July 2003 Values Update Survey (Added: December 15, 2006)

The Pew Research Center for the People & the Press sponsored the nationally representative July 2003 Values Update Survey to gather public opinion on a variety of social issues. Specifically, this survey focuses on the public's opinions on Presidential and government performance, politics, economic issues, and domestic and foreign policy.

Mid-November Survey, 2001 (Added: February 02, 2004)

This project investigated the public's attitudes on religion, media, youth engagement, and issues related to terrorism in the post-9/11 environment. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced two reports. The first dealt with religion and attitudes toward Muslim Americans. The second report addressed the media’s terrorism coverage.

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2002 (Added: February 02, 2004)

This project investigated the public's attitudes on religion and public life. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced two reports. The first report addressed America’s struggle with religion in the post 9-11 climate. The second report examined the public’s attitudes about genetic research.

Question Verification For Religion and Public Life Survey, 2001 (Added: May 01, 2003)

This dataset tests two questions (FAVAPLFD and HIRESHAR) from the project, Faith-Based Funding Backed, But Church-State Doubts Abound (2001). This study looked at the public's attitudes on funding for faith-based organizations. The survey was commissioned by The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and examined religion and culture, politics, and American life. The original survey, Religion and Public Life Survey, 2001 can be found in the ARDA Data Archive.

Religion and Public Life Survey, 2001 (Added: March 24, 2003)

According to the report Faith-Based Funding Backed, But Church-State Doubts Abound (2001), the project investigated the public's attitudes on funding for faith-based organizations. The survey was commissioned by The Pew Center for the People and the Press and looked at religion and culture, politics, and American life.

Religion and Politics Survey, 1996 (Added: May 08, 1998)

This survey, commissioned by The Pew Center for the People and the Press, focuses exclusively on religion and politics in America. The national survey was completed by the Princeton Survey Research Associates between May 31 and June 9, 1996.

Religion and Politics Survey Merged Data Set, 1994-1995 (Added: May 08, 1998)

This data file contains four national surveys completed between July 1994 and October 1995. Commissioned by The Pew Center for The People and The Press and conducted by the Princeton Survey Research Associates, the four surveys focus exclusively on religion and politics in America. Because many of the questions were repeated in two or more of the surveys, it is possible to trace changing public opinion over time.