Other Local/Regional Surveys

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Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey: Ohio Sample (2010)

The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents’ views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants’ influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress’ ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn.

Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey: Arkansas Sample (2010)

The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents’ views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants’ influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress’ ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn.

Houston Area Survey, 2010 (2010)

For the past 28 years, these countywide, random-digit-dialed, computer-assisted telephone surveys systematically measured the continuities and changes in demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes and beliefs among successive representative samples of Harris County residents. Using identical items across the years, with new questions added periodically, the annual Houston Area Survey (HAS) has tracked America’s fourth largest city in the process of fundamental transformation.

Survey items on religion inquire about service attendance, religious preference, the racial composition of the respondent's place of worship, and the importance of religion to the respondent.

Houston Area Survey, 1982-2010 (2010)

For the past 28 years, these countywide, random-digit-dialed, computer-assisted telephone surveys have systematically measured the continuities and changes in demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes and beliefs among successive representative samples of Harris County residents. Using identical items across the years, with new questions added periodically, the annual Houston Area Survey (HAS) has tracked America’s fourth largest city in the process of fundamental transformation.

Houston recovered from deep recession in the 1980s to find itself squarely in the midst of a restructured economy and a demographic revolution. New economic, educational, and environmental challenges have redefined the "pro-growth" strategies required for urban prosperity in the twenty-first century. At the same time, major immigration flows have transformed Houston into one of the nation's most culturally diverse metropolitan areas, at the center of the transformations that are refashioning the social and political landscape of urban America. The overall purpose of this continuing project is to measure systematically the way area residents are responding to these remarkable changes, and to make the findings of this research widely available to the general public and to research scholars everywhere.

Conducted annually during February and March, the interviews measure perspectives on the local and national economies, on poverty programs, interethnic relationships, and the new immigration; beliefs about discrimination and affirmative action, about education, crime, health care, taxation, and community service; assessments of downtown development, mobility and transit, land-use controls, and environmental concerns; attitudes toward abortion, homosexuality, and other aspects of “the social agenda.” They record religious and political orientations, as well as a rich array of demographic and immigration characteristics, socioeconomic indicators, and family structures.

The Gravestone Index (2007)

This file is a record of the religious and secular information found on headstones and tombstones in the United States, Canada, Britain, and Australia. The death dates on the grave markers cover the period from the early 19th century to the early 21st century. Also included is a record of carvings, statues, and other objects connected to the front or back of the grave markers.

Survey of Chicago Catholics, 2007 (2007)

This 2007 telephone survey examined the attitudes of 524 former and current Catholics living in the Chicago Archdiocese, which encompasses Cook and Lake counties and is home to 2.5 million Catholics. Current Catholics were asked a wide range of questions about their views of the church, as well as aspects of Catholic identity and commitment. Former Catholics were asked about reasons for leaving the church.

Survey of Texas Adults, 2004 (2004)

This data set is aimed at learning more about the lives of Texas adults. Specifically, the data set contains information on seven major aspects of Texans' lives: civic engagement and attitudes; volunteering; organizational memberships and giving behaviors; personality; physical and mental health; health behaviors; religious activities and beliefs. The dataset also includes information about respondents' demographic characteristics.

Survey of Religion and Community Life in Indianapolis, 1999 (1999)

Purpose of the study was twofold. First, the study was designed to collect descriptive data regarding the characteristics, attitudes, and religious beliefs and practices of Marion County residents to use as baseline measure, based on a random sample of Indianapolis residents for comparing quantitative data collected from 17 city neighborhoods as a part of the Religion and Urban Culture Project at the Polis Center. Second, the study was designed to become part of the Project's quantitative database that would provide another database for exploring Indianapolis residents' feelings about the role that religious groups and leaders play in shaping the community dynamics of Indianapolis.

Detroit Area Study, 1997: Social Change in Religion and Child Rearing (1997)

Respondents from three counties in the Detroit area were queried about their work, health, marriage and family, finances, political views, religion and child rearing. With respect to finances, respondent views were asked about credit card purchases, recording expenditures and investments. Regarding political views, respondents were questioned about political preferences, presidential values, freedom of speech, nuclear war and the interest of public officials. Questions also addressed religious beliefs and experiences, including the religiosity of respondents' parents, belief in and relationship with God, the relationship between science and religion, school prayer, divorce, homosexuality, interfaith marriages, religion of friends and observance of religious holy days. Questions were asked about the views of respondents' religious leaders on issues including drinking, abortion, and test-tube fertilization. Regarding child rearing, questions were asked pertaining to religious training given to child(ren) and frequency of prayer before meals. Background information includes marital status, employment, political orientation and income.

Faith and Community Survey of Four Indianapolis Neighborhoods, 1997 (1997)

The purpose of the study was twofold. First, the study was designed to collect basic descriptive data regarding the characteristics, attitudes, religious beliefs and practices, and social contacts of people who lived in the four study neighborhoods in Indianapolis. Second, the study was designed to become part of a quantitative database that would provide another means to explore how religious involvement influences individual attitudes about and involvement in neighborhood activities.

Winthrop University Student Religion Survey, 1996 (1996)

This study was designed by the principal investigator and his students in an upper-division sociology of religion course. The survey items were formulated around key issues in class and administered to Winthrop University students in General Education classes. The topics covered include religious background and behavior, spiritual beliefs, and attitudes toward deviant religious groups.

Religious Influence and Identity Survey, 1996 (1996)

The Religious Identity and Influence Survey was fielded in 1996 under the direction of Dr. Christian Smith of the Department of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with the assistance of David Sikkink, then PhD graduate student in Smith’s department. The survey focused on the “commitments, beliefs, concerns, and practices” of evangelicals and other church-going Protestants, as well as how they viewed the relationship between Christians and the educational, political, and other institutions within American society (Smith et al. 1998). Details on the survey research methods are published as Appendices A, B, and D in Christian Smith et al., 1998, American Evangelicalism: Embattled and Thriving, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Users must be extremely careful to use appropriate weights (described below) in their analyses.

Six-Cities Study of Trustees (1991)

The Six Cities Study, collected by researchers at Yale University’s Program on Nonprofit Organizations (PONPO), focuses on members of ninety nonprofit boards of trustees in six cities (Atlanta, Boston, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and Philadelphia). The study examines a variety of variables, including the gender, race, religion, and socioeconomic makeup of trustees, at 30-year intervals in 1931, 1961, and 1991.

American Values Scale, 1988 (1988)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year, answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale, which is a modification of the Rokeach Values Survey. The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts in on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning “no importance at all” and 9 meaning “supreme importance to me.”

Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1988 (1988)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Dimensions of Religious Commitment. Additional modules are available for free download through the Odum Institute's electronic archive, http://arc.irss.unc.edu/dvn/

The Dimensions of Religious Commitment is a questionnaire designed to measure the four dimensions of religiosity (Glock and Stark, 1965)--Belief, Ritual, Experience, and Knowledge. Originally, Glock and Stark proposed five dimensions, which include "Consequences" as the fifth dimension. However, the authors did not generate measures for this last dimension. Their analysis of the first four dimensions showed that these dimensions are essentially uncorrelated, and that other attitudes and behavior can be predicted from positions on these dimensions. Furthermore, the authors had constructed indices of the four dimensions, mainly by summing points assigned to each item that was answered in a certain direction. Among these indices, the orthodoxy index was found to be the best predictor of all other aspects of religiosity, implying that belief is the most significant component of religiosity. The entire Glock and Stark questionnaire contained more than 500 items. The interested reader may consult the published analysis.

Religious Behaviors Questionnaire, 1988 (1988)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population.

This 92-item questionnaire is designed to measure religious behaviors. For the first 90 items, the respondent indicates whether or not he or she has participated in the behavior in the past month. The last two items ask the respondent to indicate how often they have attended religious services during the past year and whether their religion is Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, other, or none.

Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1988 (1988)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, which measures religious fundamentalism among Christians- a construct similar to "orthodoxy" as conceived by some other researchers.

Dimensions of Religiosity, 1988 (1988)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966).

Religious Life Inventory, 1988 (1988)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religion Life Inventory, which consists of three scales: External, Internal, and Interactional. Additional information about the survey can be found in the Odum Institute's electronic archive.

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1988 (1988)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1987 (1987)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.

Religious Life Inventory, 1987 (1987)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religion Life Inventory, which consists of three scales: External, Internal, and Interactional. Additional information about the survey can be found in the Odum Institute's electronic archive.

American Values Scale, 1987 (1987)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year, answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale, which is a modification of the Rokeach Values Survey. The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning “no importance at all” and 9 meaning “supreme importance to me.”

Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1987 (1987)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, which measures religious fundamentalism among Christians – a construct similar to "orthodoxy" as conceived by some other researchers.

Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1987 (1987)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. The Dimensions of Religious Commitment is a questionnaire designed to measure four dimensions of religiosity (Glock and Stark, 1965): Belief, Ritual, Experience, and Knowledge. Originally, Glock and Stark proposed five dimensions, which include "Consequences" as the fifth dimension. However, the authors did not generate measures for this last dimension. Their analysis of the first four dimensions showed that these dimensions are essentially uncorrelated, and that other attitudes and behavior can be predicted from positions on these dimensions. Furthermore, the authors had constructed indices of the four dimensions, mainly by summing points assigned to each item that was answered in a certain direction. Among these indices, the orthodoxy index was found to be the best predictor of all other aspects of religiosity, implying that belief is the most significant component of religiosity. The entire Glock and Stark questionnaire contained more than 500 items. The interested reader may consult the published analysis.

Dimensions of Religiosity, 1987 (1987)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966).

Religious Behaviors Questionnaire, 1987 (1987)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population.

This 92-item questionnaire is designed to measure religious behaviors. For the first 90 items, the respondent indicates whether or not he or she has participated in the behavior in the past month. The last two items ask the respondent to indicate how often they have attended religious services during the past year and whether their religion is Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, other, or none.

Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. The Dimensions of Religious Commitment is a questionnaire designed to measure four dimensions of religiosity (Glock and Stark, 1965): Belief, Ritual, Experience, and Knowledge. Originally, Glock and Stark proposed five dimensions, which include "Consequences" as the fifth dimension. However, the authors did not generate measures for this last dimension. Their analysis of the first four dimensions showed that these dimensions are essentially uncorrelated, and that other attitudes and behavior can be predicted from positions on these dimensions. Furthermore, the authors had constructed indices of the four dimensions, mainly by summing points assigned to each item that was answered in a certain direction. Among these indices, the orthodoxy index was found to be the best predictor of all other aspects of religiosity, implying that belief is the most significant component of religiosity. The entire Glock and Stark questionnaire contained more than 500 items. The interested reader may consult the published analysis.

Tulsa, Oklahoma Area Survey, 1986 (1986)

This survey was the second of two Tulsa area studies generally modeled on the Oklahoma City studies undertaken by the University of Oklahoma. Tulsa area residents were asked about a wide range of local and national issues with additional questions covering religious preference, educational and occupational background, and political attitudes and opinions.

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales -Respondents' Same-Sex Friends, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales -Paper and Pencil Version, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.

Dimensions of Religiosity, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966).

Religious Behaviors Questionnaire, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population.

This 92-item questionnaire is designed to measure religious behaviors. For the first 90 items, the respondent indicates whether or not he or she has participated in the behavior in the past month. The last two items ask the respondent to indicate how often they have attended religious services during the past year and whether their religion is Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, other, or none.

Religious Life Inventory, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religion Life Inventory, which consists of three scales: External, Internal, and Interactional. Additional information about the survey can be found at the Odum Institute's electronic archive.

American Values Scale, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale which is modification of the Rokeach Values Survey. The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts in on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning “no importance at all” and 9 meaning “supreme importance to me.”

Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1986 (1986)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, which measures religious fundamentalism among Christians- a construct similar to "orthodoxy" as conceived by some other researchers.

Dimensions of Religiosity, 1985 (1985)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966).

American Values Scale, 1985 (1985)

The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year, answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale, which is a modification of the Rokeach Values Survey. The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning "no importance at all" and 9 meaning "supreme importance to me."

Tulsa, Oklahoma Area Survey, 1985 (1985)

This survey was the first of two Tulsa area studies generally modeled on the Oklahoma City studies undertaken by the University of Oklahoma. Tulsa area residents were asked about a wide range of local and national issues with additional questions covering religious preference, educational and occupational background, and political attitudes and opinions.

Tulsa Oklahoma Area Science and Technology Survey, 1981 (1981)

This survey is part of an investigation of the nature of public attitudes toward science and technology. Religiosity, educational and occupational background, political attitudes and opinions and attitudes about a variety of scientific topics are topics covered in the questionnaire. Data collection was carried out by senior mass communication and sociology majors under the supervision of the principal investigators.

Detroit Area Study, 1971 - Social Problems and Social Change in Detroit (1971)

The study was conducted during the spring and summer of 1971. The aim of the 1971 Detroit Area Study was to gather information on social change in the Detroit area by replicating items from nine earlier Detroit Area Studies that were conducted in 1953-1959, 1968 and 1969. The criteria used for selecting the question items were that they: (1) not be dated by wording or subject matter, (2) be relevant to some problem of current public concern or a continuing issue of sociological theory, and (3) be of the type that would be manageable in a long interview on diverse subjects. The questions chosen to be included in the 1971 Detroit Area Study examined issues such as values in marriage, ideal number of children, satisfaction of wives with marriage, decision-making and division of labor within a marriage, attitudes toward women and work, child-rearing, social participation, religious participation and beliefs, moral and job values, political orientation and participation, evaluation of various institutions and racial attitudes. In addition to the items replicated from the previous studies, respondents' attitudes toward the United States sending troops to Vietnam were explored. Background variables established respondents' age, sex, race, educational level, marital status, occupation, class identification and relationship to head of household. Demographic information also was collected on the respondent's spouse and parents.

Harris 1969 New York City Racial and Religious Survey, No. 1925, Non-Jewish-White (1969)

This study commissioned by the Ford Foundation, studied black-Jewish relations in New York City to determine points of contact between the groups and delineate current and future conflict areas. Attitudes underlying conflict or cooperation as well as perceptions of non-black, non-Jewish population were are also examined. Questions were asked in the areas of race relations, discrimination, alienation, community relations, anti-Semitism, integration, religion, violence, and black and Jewish relations. The HAR69NJW is the sample consisting of only non-Jewish-whites. This survey is related to the HAR69BLK (black sample) and the HAR69JEW (Jewish sample).

Salt Lake City and San Francisco Surveys of Mormons, 1967-1969 (Salt Lake City Sample) (1969)

These are the first large-scale surveys of Mormons ever conducted, with or without church auspices, based upon probability samples of adult Mormon householders. As of century's end, these are the only such surveys available to the public, although the LDS Church has in recent years conducted many private surveys of its own for various purposes. Large as they are, the Mauss surveys cannot be considered representative of all Mormons everywhere, of course, even in the 1960s, but they are certainly representative of Salt Lake City Mormons then, as well as of the most highly urbanized San Francisco Mormons (and, by extension, perhaps of Mormons in similar sections of other American cities).

The questionnaire and the survey procedures were modeled in large part after those of the Glock and Stark 1964 survey of Northern California churches (which did not include Mormons). Accordingly, the 23-page questionnaire includes many items intended to measure various dimensions of religiosity; the usual demographic and social class information; the conversion experience (for converts); religious defection and reactivation; civil liberties; and attitudes toward blacks and Jews.

The nature and scope of these Mormon surveys, which used identical questionnaires, were intentionally guided by those of the Glock and Stark instrument and were carried out during the principal investigator's doctoral studies under Glock. The survey procedures in Salt Lake City were fairly straightforward and yielded data as representative for Mormons as the Glock and Stark survey was for Catholics and Protestants. However, the rationale for selecting the two Mormon wards in San Francisco, and none of the others, was that the Bay and the Mission Wards consisted disproportionately of the most "urbanized" church members (as opposed to suburban neighborhoods) -- that is, those closest to the inner-city, the apartment dwellers and the temporary residents. These two Mormon wards also included most of the ethnic minorities among Mormons in San Francisco (primarily Hispanic, Polynesian and Asian-Americans). The idea was to get as stark a contrast as possible to the Salt Lake City Mormons.

Harris 1969 New York City Racial and Religious Survey, No. 1925, Blacks (1969)

This study commissioned by the Ford Foundation, studied black-Jewish relations in New York City to determine points of contact between the groups and delineate current and future conflict areas. Attitudes underlying conflict or cooperation as well as perceptions of non-black, non-Jewish population were also examined. Questions were asked in the areas of race relations, discrimination, alienation, community relations, anti-Semitism, integration, religion, violence, and black and Jewish relations. This survey is related to the HAR69JEW (Jewish sample) and the HAR69NJW (sample consisting of only non-Jewish-whites).

Harris 1969 New York City Racial and Religious Survey, No. 1925, Jewish (1969)

This study commissioned by the Ford Foundation, studies black-Jewish relations in New York City to determine points of contact between the groups and delineate current and future conflict areas. Attitudes underlying conflict or cooperation as well as perceptions of non-black, non-Jewish population are also examined. Questions were asked in the areas of race relations, discrimination, alienation, community relations, anti-Semitism, integration, religion, violence, and black and Jewish relations. The HAR69JEW is the sample consisting of only of those who identified their religion as Jewish. This survey is related to the HAR69BLK (black sample) and the HAR69NJW (non-Jewish-white sample).

Salt Lake City and San Francisco Surveys of Mormons, 1967-1969 (San Francisco Sample) (1969)

These are the first large-scale surveys of Mormons ever conducted, with or without church auspices, based upon probability samples of adult Mormon householders. As of century's end, these are the only such surveys available to the public, although the LDS Church has in recent years conducted many private surveys of its own for various purposes. Large as they are, the Mauss surveys cannot be considered representative of all Mormons everywhere, of course, even in the 1960s, but they are certainly representative of Salt Lake City Mormons then, as well as of the most highly urbanized San Francisco Mormons (and, by extension, perhaps of Mormons in similar sections of other American cities).

The questionnaire and the survey procedures were modeled in large part after those of the Glock and Stark 1964 survey of Northern California churches (which did not include Mormons). Accordingly, the 23-page questionnaire includes many items intended to measure various dimensions of religiosity; the usual demographic and social class information; the conversion experience (for converts); religious defection and reactivation; civil liberties; and attitudes toward blacks and Jews.

The nature and scope of these Mormon surveys, which used identical questionnaires, were intentionally guided by those of the Glock and Stark instrument and were carried out during the principal investigator's doctoral studies under Glock. The survey procedures in Salt Lake City were fairly straightforward and yielded data as representative for Mormons as the Glock and Stark survey was for Catholics and Protestants. However, the rationale for selecting the two Mormon wards in San Francisco, and none of the others, was that the Bay and the Mission Wards consisted disproportionately of the most "urbanized" church members (as opposed to suburban neighborhoods) -- that is, those closest to the inner-city, the apartment dwellers and the temporary residents. These two Mormon wards also included most of the ethnic minorities among Mormons in San Francisco (primarily Hispanic, Polynesian and Asian-Americans). The idea was to get as stark a contrast as possible to the Salt Lake City Mormons.

Survey of Northern California Church Bodies, 1963 (1963)

This study sought to answer three fundamental questions about religious commitment: What is the nature of religious commitment? What are the social and psychological sources of religious commitment? What are the social and psychological consequences of religious commitment? (Stark, Rodney and Charles Y. Glock,1968, p. 2-3).

Detroit Area Study, 1958: The Religious Factor (1958)

The Detroit Area Study (DAS) was established at the University of Michigan in 1951 primarily to provide practical social research training for graduate students. In addition, the Detroit Area Study was intended to serve as a resource for basic research and to provide reliable data on the Greater Detroit community. Surveys have been conducted annually since 1951-52 on a variety of subjects. The specific problems that DAS investigates each year are selected by the DAS Executive Committee after reviewing research proposals submitted by interested faculty members.

The 1958 Detroit Area Study, “Religion in the Metropolitan Community”, consists of 656 respondents in the Detroit metropolitan area. This survey provides information on their religious attitudes and activities, as well as their economic and political attitudes and behavior. Respondents were asked about their belief in God and in life after death, the effects of their religious beliefs on their political beliefs, and the kinds of issues religious leaders should take a public stand on. Several questions probed respondents' views of other religious groups, as well as their attitudes on such issues as gambling, birth control, and the use of alcohol. Other topics covered include: information about respondents' economic behaviors such as saving and purchases on installment plans, respondents' opinions of government take-over of large industries and greater involvement in education and housing, respondents' attitudes toward income-earning work, science, degree of free speech, and racial equity, inter-group images, family and child-rearing patterns, welfare legislation, civil liberties, international relations, legislation on moral issues, doctrinal orthodoxy, devotionalism, and the effects of religion on politics as well as on daily life. Demographic variables specify age, sex, race, education, place of birth, marital status, number of children, length of time at present residence, religion, political party affiliation, income, occupation, original nationality of husband's and wife's family, home ownership, social class identification, and length of residence in the Detroit area.

New York Religion 1855-1865 (1865)

The 1855 and 1865 New York state censuses include a wide range of social, political and economic indicators for every town and city in the state of New York (a total of 942 "places" in 1865 and 918 in 1855). Included in the social indicators were data on all 53 active denominations in 1865 and 42 denominations in 1855. This file includes selected social and demographic indicators, and a measure of church attendance for all denominations in 1855 and 1865. The data contained in this file include only a small portion of the New York censuses. State censuses were also conducted in 1845 and 1875.