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Search thousands of sociological books, journal articles, theses and dissertations by subject, author, title or publication information. To begin, enter search term(s) below and click Go! Title links in search results lead to item in Amazon.com.

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Citations
  • Lifetime trauma, prayer, and psychological distress in late life.
    Krause, Neal (2009)
    International Journal for the Psychology of Religion 19: 55-72.

    Associated Search Terms: Distress; Gerontology; Prayer
  • Does Negative Interaction in the Church Increase Psychological Distress? Longitudinal Findings from the Presbyterian Panel Survey.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Wei Zhang, Neal Krause, and John P. Marcum (2009)
    Sociology of Religion 70:4: 409-431.

    Analyzes 1997 & '99 panel data from Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) members & elders; distress accompanied criticism cross-sectionally & excessive demands over time.

    Associated Search Terms: Panel study; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.; Distress
  • Balm in Gilead: Racism, Religious Involvement, and Psychological Distress among African-American Adults.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Marc A. Musick, and Andrea K. Henderson (2008)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 47:2: 291-309.

    Based on panel survey data from African American adults; religion offsets the distress caused by discrimination.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Distress; Panel study; Racism
  • Does Religion Buffer the Effects of Discrimination on Mental Health? Differing Effects by Race.
    Bierman, Alex (2006)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 45:4: 551-565.

    Based on 1995 U.S. survey data from adults in the 48 contiguous states; religious attendance moderates distress, seemingly related to discrimination, among African Americans.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Discrimination; Distress; African Americans; Mental health
  • The Sense of Divine Control and Psychological Distress: Variations Across Race and Socioeconomic Status.
    Schieman, Scott, Tetyana Pudrovska, Leonard I. Pearlin, and Christopher G. Ellison (2006)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 45:4: 529-549.

    Based on 2001-02 interview data from senior citizens in & near Washington, D.C.; sense of divine control correlates inversely with distress among African Americans & positively with it among whites.

    Associated Search Terms: Stratification; Control, divine; Gerontology; African Americans; Mental health; Race; Distress; United States, District of Columbia, Washington
  • Religious Involvement, Stress, and Mental Health: Findings from the 1995 Detroit Area Study.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Jason D. Boardman, David R. Williams, and James S. Jackson (2001)
    Social Forces 80:1: 215-249.

    Telephone interview data from the 1995 Detroit Area Study: religious attendance predicts well-being positively & distress negatively; prayer weakly predicts well-being negatively & distress positively; afterlife belief predicts well-being positively.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Michigan, Detroit; Well-being; Practice; Prayer; Belief; Distress; Afterlife
  • Religiosity, Spirituality, and Personal Distress among College Students.
    Schafer, Walter E. (1997)
    Journal of College Student Development 38: 633-644.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Distress; Students, undergraduate
  • Religion and Psychological Distress.
    Ross, Catherine E. (1990)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 29:2: 236-245.

    Analysis of an Illinois sample shows a curvilinear effect of belief strength on distress.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, U.S.A.; Mental health; Protestant, U.S.A.; Distress; Belief; United States, Illinois; Catholic, U.S.A.
[Viewing Matches 1-8]  (of 8 total matches in Citations)

Citation data are provided by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio).

The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.

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