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Search thousands of sociological books, journal articles, theses and dissertations by subject, author, title or publication information. To begin, enter search term(s) below and click Go! Title links in search results lead to item in Amazon.com.

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Citations
  • The effects of belonging to an alcohol-proscribing religious group on the relationship between moderate alcohol consumption and mortality.
    David, Hayward R., and Neal Krause (2014)
    Social Science and Medicine 101: 1-8.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Mortality
  • The longevity effects of religious and nonreligious participation: A meta-analysis and meta-regression.
    Shor, Eran, and David J. Roelfs (2013)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 52:1: 120-145.

    Finds the reduction of mortality due to religious participation does not differ from that from other kinds of social participation.

    Associated Search Terms: Social participation; Mortality; Practice
  • Religion and adult mortality: Group- and individual-level perspectives.
    Idler, Ellen L. (2011)
    In Richard Rogers and Eileen Crimmins (eds.) International Handbook of Adult Mortality. New York: Springer, pp. 345-377.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Health
  • Ethnic and religious differentials in Bulgarian mortality, 1993-1998.
    Kohler, Iliana V., and Samuel H. Preston (2011)
    Population Studies 5: 91-113.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Bulgaria; Demography
  • Religious Involvement and Religious Struggles.
    Hill, Terrence D., and Ryon J. Cobb (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 239-260.

    Reviews the literature & develops a theoretical model for the relationship between religion & longevity.

    Associated Search Terms: Social support; Depression; Doubt; Mental health; Belief; Conversion; Self-esteem; Mortality
  • Religion and Infant Mortality in the U.S.: A Preliminary Study of Denominational Variations.
    Bartkowski, John P., Xiaohe Xu, and Ginny E. Garcia (2011)
    Religions 2:3: 264-276. www.mdpi.com/journal/religions

    U.S. county-level data show conservative Protestant & Catholic contexts are associated with lower infant morality rates, Pentecostal with higher.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Infant mortality; Catholic, U.S.A.; Conservative/liberal; Pentecostal, U.S.A.
  • Religious Involvement and Mortality Risk Among Pre-retirement Aged U.S. Adults.
    Hummer, Robert A., Maureen R. Benjamins, Christopher G. Ellison, and Richard G. Rogers (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religon, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 273-291.

    Focuses on American respondents aged 51-61 in 1992, an age range in which mortality is often preventable. Tracks respondents up to 2000. With statistical controls, attendance was still related inversely with death.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Health; Practice
  • Religious Attendance and Cause-specific Mortality in the United States.
    Rogers, Richard G., Patrick M. Krueger, and Robert A. Hummer (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, ppp. 292-320.

    Analyzes 1987 American interview data from adults. Attendance predicts net lower rates of mortality & lower rates for specific causes (ischemic heart disease, respiratory disease, external causes, & residual causes). Additional findings varied with gender.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; United States; Mortality; Health
  • Mortality Differentials and Religion in the United States: Religious Affiliation and Attendance.
    Sullivan, Allison R. (2010)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 49:4: 740-753.

    Analyzes Health and Retirement Study data (1992-2006); Catholics, Evangelicals, & Black Protestants benefit from attendance.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Denomination (organizational entity); Practice; Mortality
  • Does devoutness delay death? Psychological investment in religion and its association with longevity in the Terman sample.
    McCullough, Michael E., Howard S. Friedman, Craig K. Enders, and Leslie R. Martin (2009)
    Personality Processes and Individual Differences 97:5: 866-882.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Religiosity; Mortality
  • Religious Affiliation, Ethnicity, and Child Mortality in Chiapas, México.
    Vargas Valle, Eunice D., Leticia Fernández, and Joseph E. Potter (2009)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48:3:588-603.

    Analyzes 2000 census data; Presbyterian indigenous people had lower child mortality rate than other indigenous people, presumably because of a Presbyterian health ministry.

    Associated Search Terms: Mexico, Chiapas; Denomination (organizational entity); Children; Mortality
  • Frequency of Attendance at Religious Services and Mortality in a U.S. National Cohort.
    Gillum, Richard Frank, Dana E. King, Thomas O. Obisesan, and Harold G. Koenig (2008)
    Annals of Epidemiology 18(2):124-129.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Practice; Mortality
  • Faith, Morality and Mortality: The Ecological Impact of Religion on Population Health.
    Blanchard, Troy C., John P. Bartkowski, Todd L. Matthews, and Kent R. Kerley (2008)
    Social Forces 86:4: 1591-1620.

    Uses 2000 census county-level data, 2000 Glenmary membership data, & 1998-2002 U.S. mortality data. Number of conservative Protstant congregations predicts higher mortality, presumably because of otherworldliness & neglect of health infrastructure.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Individualism; United States; Mortality; Otherworldliness; Conservative, U.S.A.; Ecology
  • Medicine, Religion, and Health. Where Science and Spirituality Meet.
    Koenig, Harold G. (2008)
    West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania: Templeton Foundation Press.

    Detailed review of the literature on the effect of religiosity on aspects of health.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Stress; Health; Definition of religion; Coping; Anxiety; Mortality; Disability; Suicide; Depression; Social support; Well-being, psychological
  • Religion and survival in a secular region: 20-year follow-up of 734 Danish adults born in 1914.
    laCour, Peter, Kirsten Avlund, and Kirsten Schultz-Larsen (2006)
    Social Science and Medicine 62:1: 157-164.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Demography; Denmark; Gerontology
  • Religious Attendance and Mortality: Implications for the Black-White Crossover.
    Dupre, Matthew E., Alexis T. Franzese, and Emilio A. Parrado (2006)
    Demography 43:1: 141-164.

    Associated Search Terms: Race; Practice; Mortality; Demography
  • Church-based social support and mortality.
    Krause, Neal (2006)
    Journals of Gerontology: Socia Sciences 61B: S140-S146.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Mortality; Social support
  • The Religious Claim on Babies in Nineteenth-century Montreal.
    Thornton, Patricia, and Sherry Olson (2006)
    In Renzo Derosas and Frans van Poppel (eds.) Religion and the Decline of Fertility in the Western World. Dordrecht: Springer, pp. 207-233.

    Montreal 1881, using parish and census data, take infant mortality into account to calculate fertility by ethnicity & religion.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Canada, Quebec, Montreal; Infant mortality; Fertility
  • Religious attendance and 12-year suvival in older persons.
    Teinonen, Timo, Tero Vahlberg, Raimo Isoaho, and Sirkka-Liisa Kivela (2005)
    Age and Ageing 34:4: 406-409.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Mortality
  • Religious Attendance and Mortality: An 8-year Follow-up of Older Mexican Americans.
    Hill, Terrence D., Jacqueline L. Angel, Christopher G. Ellison, and Ronald J. Angel (2005)
    Journals of Gerontology Series B: Psychological Sciences & Social Sciences 60B:2:S102-S109.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Practice; Mexican Americans
  • Religious attendance as a predictor of survival in the EPESE cohorts.
    Bagiella, Emilia, Victor Hong, and Richard P. Sloan (2005)
    International Journal of Epidemiology 34:2: 443-451.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Mortality; Practice
  • A Cohort Study Found that Earlier and Longer Seventh-Day Adventist Church Membership was Associated with Reduced Male Mortality.
    Huech, Ivor, Bjarne K. Jacobsen, and Gary E. Fraser (2005)
    Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 58:1: 83-91.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Seventh-day Adventist
  • A cohort study found that earlier and longer Seventh-day Adventist Church membership was associated with reduced male morality.
    Heuch, Ivar, Bjarne K. Jacobsen, and Gary E. Fraser (2005)
    Journal of Clinical Epidemiology 58:1: 83-91.

    Associated Search Terms: Membership; Mortality; Demography; Seventh-day Adventist
  • Religious Participation, Interleukin-6, and Mortality in Older Adults.
    Lutgendorf, S.K., D. Russell, P. Ulrich, T.B. Harris, and R. Wallace. (2004)
    Health Psychology 23:5: 465-475.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Medical; Practice
  • Attendance at Religious Services and Mortality in a National Sample.
    Musick, Marc A., James S. House, and David R. Williams (2004)
    Journal of Health & Social Behavior 45:2: 198-213.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; United States; Mortality
  • Religious Involvement and Adult Mortality in the United States: Review and Perspective.
    Hummer, Robert A., Christopher G. Ellison, Richard G. Rogers, Benjamin E. Moulton, and Ron Romero. (2004)
    Southern Medical Journal 97:12: 1223-1230.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; United States
  • The peculiar pattern of mortality of Jews in Moscow, 1993-1995.
    Shkolnikov, Vladimir M., Evgueni M. Andreev, Jon Anson, and France Meslé (2004)
    Popultion Studies 58:3: 311-329.

    Associated Search Terms: Russia, Moscow; Jewish, Russia; Mortality; Demography
  • Religion and Health. Depressive Symptoms and Mortality as Case Studies.
    McCullough, Michael E., and Timothy B. Smith (2003)
    In Michele Dillon (ed.) Handbook of the Sociology of Religion. New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 190-204.

    Review of the literature.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Medical; Mortality; Death
  • A Review of Mortality Research on Clergy and Other Religious Professionals.
    Flannelly, Kevin J., Andrew J. Weaver, David B. Larson, and Harold G. Koenig (2002)
    Journal of Religion and Health 41:1: 57-68.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Clergy; Mortality
  • Religious Struggle as a Predictor of Mortality among Medically Ill Elderly Patients: A Two-year Longitudinal Study.
    Pargament, Kenneth I., Harold G. Koenig, N. Tarakeshwar, and J. Hahn (2001)
    Archives of Internal Medicine 161: 1881-1885.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Mortality; Longitudinal
  • Religious attendance increases survival by improving and mantaining good health behaviors, mental health, and socal relationships.
    Strawbridge, William J., Sarah J. Shema, Richard D. Cohen, and George A. Kaplan (2001)
    Annals of Behavioral Medicine 23:1: 68-74.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Demography; Mortality
  • Religious Involvement and Mortality Risk among African American Adults.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Robert A. Hummer, Shannon Cormier, and Richard G. Rogers (2000)
    Research on Aging 22:6: 630-667.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; African Americans
  • Does Private Religious Activity Prolong Survival? A Six-Year Follow-up Study of 3,851 Older Adults.
    Helm, H.M., J.C. Hays, E.P. Flint, Harold G. Koenig, and Daniel G. Blazer (2000)
    Journals of Gerontology Series A: 55: M400-M405.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Gerontology; Devotionalism; Mortality
  • Comparative strength of association between religious attendance and survival.
    Strawbridge, William J., Richard D. Cohen, and Sarah J. Shema (2000)
    International Journal of Psychiatry in Medicine 30:4: 299-308.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Demography; Mortality
  • Religious involvement and mortality: A meta-analytic review.
    McCullough, Michael E., William T. Hoyt, David B. Larson, Harold G. Koenig, and Carl Thoresen (2000)
    Health Psychology 19:3: 211-222.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Mortality; Demography
  • Does religious attendance prolong survival? A six-year follow-up study of 3968 older adults.
    Koenig, Harold G., Judith C. Hays, David B. Larson, Linda K. George, Harvey Jay Cohen, Michael E. McCullough, Keith G. Meador, and Dan G. Blazer (1999)
    Journals of Gerontology Seies A: Biological Sciences and Medical Sciences 54:7: M370-376.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Demography; Mortality; Gerontology
  • Religious Involvement and U.S. Adult Mortality.
    Hummer, Robert A., Richard G. Rogers, Charles B. Nam, and Christopher G. Ellison (1999)
    Demography 36: 273-285.

    Based on U.S.A.. data; religious attendance not only negatively predicts mortality because the ill cannot attend, but also because of its association with better health practices & with social ties.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Mortality; Demography; Practice
  • Religion and mortality among the community-dwelling elderly.
    Oman, Douglas, and Dwayne Reed (1998)
    American Journal of Public Health 88:10: 1469-1475.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Gerontology; Mortality
  • Stressors in highly valued roles, religious coping, and mortality.
    Krause, Neal (1998)
    Psychology and Aging 13:2: 242-255.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Stress; Coping
  • Frequent Attendance at Religious Services and Mortality over 28 years.
    Strawbridge, William J., Richard D. Cohen, Sarah J. Shema, and George A. Kaplan (1997)
    American Journal of Public Health 87:6: 957-961.

    Analyzes 1965-94 panel data; frequent attenders, especially females, had lower mortality rates in part because they made healthy changes in life style.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Practice; Mortality; United States, California, Alameda County
  • Does Religious Observance Promote Health? Mortality in Secular vs. Religious Kibbutzim in Israel.
    Kark, Jeremy D., Galia Shemi, Yehiel Friedlander, Oz Martin, Orly Manor, and S.H. Blondheim (1996)
    American Journal of Public Health 86:3: 341-346.

    Associated Search Terms: Commune; Jewish, Israel; Mortality; Israel; Health; Comparative; Kibbutz
  • Cardiovascular Mortality in Mormons and Non-Mormons in Utah, 1969-1971.
    Lyon, Joseph L., Harry P. Wetzler, John W. Gardner, Melville R. Klauber, and Roger R. Williams (1978)
    American Journal of Epidemiology 108:5: 357-366.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Utah; Mortality; Mormon, U.S.A.; Medical
  • Dying as Social Behavior: Mormon Behavior through Half a Century.
    Vernon, Glenn M., and Charles E. Waddell (1974)
    Omega 5:3: 199-206.

    Mortality rates, Utah, 1920-70, compared to U.S.A. rates.

    Associated Search Terms: Mormon, U.S.A.; United States, Utah; Mortality; Demography; Death
  • Church Attendance and Health.
    Comstock, George W., and Kay B. Partridge (1972)
    Journal of Chronic Diseases 25: 665-672.

    Analyzes 1963 interview data from Washington County, Maryland; notes correlations of health-related phenomena with church attendance that may or may not be spurious.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; United States, Maryland, Washington County; Mortality; Practice
  • Religion and rates of mortality among total populations.
    Poplin, Dennis E. (1970)
    In Thomas R. Ford and Gordon F. De Jong (eds.) Social Demography. Englewood Ciffs, New Jersey: Prentice-Hall, pp. 236-243.

    Compares mortality rates of selected U.S. counties that were predominately Catholic, Lutheran, or Mormon in 1952. The predominately Lutheran counties had lower mortality rates.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Lutheran, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.; Demography; Ecology; Mormon, U.S.A.
  • The Health of the Clergy. A Review of Demographic Literature.
    King, Haitung, and John C. Bailar, III (1969)
    Demography 1: 27-43.

    Reviews literature on clergy in Great Britain, U.S.A., Switzerland, & the city of Paris; some data are from the 19th century.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Great Britain, Scotland; Great Britain, England; Mortality; France, Paris; Medical; Great Britain, Wales; Clergy; United States
  • Mortality among Lutheran Clergymen.
    King, Haitung, and John C. Bailar III (1968)
    Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly 46: 527-548.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Clergy; Mortality; Lutheran
  • Mortality among Lutheran Clergymen.
    King, Haitung, and John C. Bailar, III (1968)
    Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly 46:4: 527-548.

    Analyzes 1950-60 data on United Lutheran Church in America (merged in '62 into Lutheran Church in America) clergy; shows a low mortality rate.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Mortality; United Lutheran Church in America
  • Role Satisfactions and Length of Life in a Closed Population.
    Madigan, Francis C. (1962)
    American Journal of Sociology 67:6: 640-649.

    Analyzes 1953-57 data on mortality rates of a religious order's priests, mostly American.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Clergy role; Catholic, U.S.A.; Orders/congregations; Mortality; Demography
  • Are Sex Mortality Differentials Biologically Caused?
    Madigan, Francis C. (1957)
    Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly 35: 202-223.

    Uses sample data on religious Brothers & Sisters from the Official Catholic Directory (U.S.A.); women live longer, compared to men with similar stressors.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Mortality; Catholic, U.S.A.; Sisters; Brothers; Orders/congregations
[Viewing Matches 1-50] > [View Matches 1-51]  (of 51 total matches in Citations)

Citation data are provided by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio).

The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.

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