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Baylor Religion Survey, Wave II (2007) - Instructional Dataset (Uploaded: 10/9/2014)

The Baylor Institute for Studies of Religion (ISR) received a major three-year grant from the John M. Templeton Foundation, to conduct a nationally representative multi-year study of religious values, practices, and behaviors, with a specific focus on consumption of religious goods and services. Using a host of new survey items that improve upon previous work, the study will yield new data to more systematically explore and better understand what sometimes appears to be an ambiguous relationship between trust, civic engagement, and religion. In partnering with the Gallup Organization, we believe this cutting-edge study has the potential to generate data that may well cause scholars to rethink our currently used measures of religious commitment or devoutness, as well as various theories linking the influence of religion to civic engagement, spiritual capital, and many other important social and behavioral outcomes.

This instructional dataset contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original dataset. This dataset is different from the original dataset in two ways. All missing data codes have been set to system missing, and additional variables have been added in which some continuous variables have been categorized.

General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined - Instructional Dataset (Uploaded: 10/9/2014)

The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).

This instructional dataset contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original dataset. This dataset is different from the original dataset in two ways. All missing data codes have been set to system missing, and additional variables have been added in which some continuous variables have been categorized.

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, United Church of Christ (UCC) Congregational Profile Survey (Uploaded: 9/19/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2)ómaking it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for the sample of the United Church of Christ (UCC) congregations that completed the Congregational Profile Survey form. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 UCC Attender data and UCC Leader data will be provided in separate data files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, United Church of Christ (UCC) Leader Survey (Uploaded: 9/19/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2)ómaking it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for the United Church of Christ (UCC) Leader Survey for congregations participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 UCC Attender data and UCC Congregational Profile data will be provided in separate data files.)

U.S. Congregational Life Survey, Wave 2, 2008/2009, United Church of Christ (UCC) Attender Survey (Uploaded: 9/19/2014)

More than 500,000 worshipers in more than 5,000 congregations across America participated in the U.S. Congregational Life Survey (Wave 1 and Wave 2)ómaking it the largest survey of worshipers in America ever conducted. Three types of surveys were completed in each participating congregation: (a) an attender survey completed by all worshipers age 15 and older who attended worship services during the weekend the survey was given; (b) a congregational profile describing the congregationís facilities, staff, programs, and worship services completed by one person in the congregation; and (c) a leader survey completed by the pastor, priest, minister, rabbi, or other principal leader. Together the information collected provides a unique three-dimensional look at religious life in America. (From Appendix 1, U.S. Congregational Life Survey Methodology, A Field Guide to U.S. Congregations, Second Edition.)

This data file contains data for a random sample of United Church of Christ (UCC) worship attenders participating in Wave 2 of the U.S. Congregational Life Survey. (U.S. Congregational Life Survey Wave 2 UCC Congregational Profile data and UCC Leader data will be provided in separate files.)

The Ethno-Linguistic Situation in the Parishes of U.S. Orthodox Christian Churches (Uploaded: 9/19/2014)

The goal of this study and survey was to assess the usage of various languages and the strength of the ethnic culture in U.S. Orthodox parishes. This survey includes parishes from different parts of the United States and from various Orthodox jurisdictions.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS73 Djupe, The Political Impact of Message Attributes from Religious Elites (Uploaded: 9/19/2014)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

The study focuses on the affect religious attributes may have on messages about global warming. Respondents will receive information about 1) the religious affiliation of a public official and 2) the way he made his decision to take a stance on global warming. This is a 2x2 between subject design, where the first factor is the source cue (Present/Absent) and the second factor is the decision process (Present/Absent). In total, there are four conditions and respondents are assigned with equal probabilities.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS16 Glazier, Providential Religious Beliefs and U.S. Foreign Policy (Uploaded: 9/19/2014)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

This study uses a 2X3 experimental study design to examine how religious frames of natural disasters and political crises may influence the support for government intervention. There are a total of six experimental conditions. The first three experimental conditions deal with a hypothetical foreign policy speech regarding government intervention in a foreign natural disaster. One condition is unframed, another condition frames it as a responsibility to international agreement, and the last condition frames the issue as a religious duty as a blessed nation. Another set of three conditions deal with a hypothetical foreign policy speech regarding government intervention in a foreign political crisis. One condition is unframed, another condition frames it as a responsibility to international agreement, and the last condition frames the issue as a religious duty as a blessed nation. Through this experiment, we can examine the effects of civil religion.

Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS101 Lee, Cultural Affinities, Regime Type, and Foreign Policy Opinion Formation (Uploaded: 9/19/2014)

TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

This experiment explores the role of region-specific cultural biases on individual citizensí perceptions of security threats and seeks to disentangle this effect from the impact of knowledge of regime type. In two different scenarios, the type of government of a given country (democratic/non-democratic) and the religion of a given group (Christianity/Islam/Hinduism) are rotated for each experimental condition (six total conditions, two different scenarios). Respondentís assignment to versions of the two scenarios is independent. In other words, there are two separate randomizations to one of six conditions, one for each scenario. The first scenario (Scenario A) deals with an international terrorist organization and the second scenario (Scenario B) deals with a foreign country developing nuclear weapons.

National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, and 2012) (Uploaded: 9/10/2014)

The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset "fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing, for the first time, data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations" (Chaves et al. 1999, p.460). Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the NCS data is the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. In 2006-07, a panel component was added to the NCS. In addition to the new cross-section of congregations generated in conjunction with the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS), a stratified random sample was drawn from congregations who participated in the 1998 NCS. The 2006-07 NCS sample, then, includes a subset of cases that were also interviewed in 1998. The 2012 NCS includes an oversample of Hispanic congregations.

The NCS Panel Dataset is also available from the ARDA.