Niger
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  Preferred Religion (2015)1: Sunni

  Majority Religion (2015)2: Sunni Muslim (81.2%)

Features Of Constitution

Is there a constitution?3 Yes
Does the constitution provide for freedom of religion?3 Yes

Constitution

Constitution Year4 2010
Last Amended4 not amended
Source4 Digitheque MJP
Translation4 Unofficial translation by ARDA staff from French source
Current as of4 May 11, 2011

Constitution Excerpts (clauses that reference religion)4

Article 3

The Republic of Niger is a unitary state. It is unified, indivisible, democratic and social.
Its basic principles are:
- Government of the People, by the People, and for the People;
- The separation of the state and religion;
- Social justice;
- National solidarity.


Article 8

The Republic of Niger is a state of law.
It guarantees everyone equality before the law without distinction by gender, or social, racial, ethnic or religious origin.
All faiths are respected and protected. No religion or belief can assume political power or interfere in the affairs of the state.
All propaganda of a regional, racial or ethnic character and any instance of discrimination based on race, social status, gender, ethnicity, politics or religion are punishable by law.


Article 9

…Political parties of an ethnic, religious or regional character are prohibited. No party may be created to promote an ethnic group, region or religion, subject to the penalties provided by law.


Article 17

Everyone has the right to the free development of his personality in its material, intellectual, cultural, artistic and religious dimensions provided that they do not infringe upon the rights of others or offend the constitutional order, law or morality.


Article 30

Everyone has the right to freedom of thought, opinion, expression, conscience, religion and worship.
The state guarantees the free exercise of religion and the expression of beliefs.
These rights are exercised with respect to public order, social peace and national unity.


Article 50

Before taking office, the President of the Republic takes an oath on the holy book of his religion before the Constitutional Court, in the presence of members of Parliament, as follows:
"Before God and the sovereign people of Niger, We ______________, elected President of the Republic in accordance with the law, do solemnly swear on the Holy Book:
- To respect and uphold the Constitution that the people have given freely;
- To loyally fulfill the high functions with which we are invested;
- To never betray or misrepresent the aspirations of the people;
- To respect and defend the republican form of government;
- To preserve the territorial integrity and unity of the nation;
- To respect and defend the rights and freedoms of citizens;
- To neither take any action nor condone any action that is demeaning to human dignity;
- To ensure the neutrality of the administration [translation note: this may mean "civil service"] and to respect the texts that consecrate its depoliticization;
- To work tirelessly for the happiness of the people;
- To spare no effort for the realization of African Unity;
- To be a faithful and loyal servant of the people.
In case of perjury, we will suffer the rigors of the law.
May God help us."
The oath shall be administered by the Constitutional Court.


Article 74

Before taking office, the incoming Prime Minister, shall take the following oath before the National Assembly on the Holy Book of his religion:
"Before God and before the representatives of the sovereign people of Niger, We, Prime Minister, Head of Government, solemnly swear on the Holy Book:
- To respect the Constitution that the people have given freely;
- To loyally fulfill the high functions with which we are invested;
- To respect and defend the republican form of government;
- To respect and defend the rights and freedoms of citizens;
- To neither take any action nor condone any action that is demeaning to human dignity;
- To ensure the neutrality of the administration [translation note: this may mean "civil serv


Sources

1.  The Religious Characteristics of States Dataset Project: Government Religious Preference (GRP) measures government-level favoritism toward, and disfavor against, 30 religious denominations. A series of ordered categorical variables index the state's institutional favoritism in 28 different ways. The variables are combined to form five composite indices for five broad components of state-religion: official status, religious education, financial support, regulatory burdens, and freedom of practice. The five components' composites in turn are further combined into a single composite score, the GRP score. The RCS Data Project would like to acknowledge, recognize, and express our deepest gratitude for the significant contributions of Todd M. Johnson the principal investigator of the World Christian Database and the co-principal investigator of the World Religion Database.

2.  The Religious Characteristics of States Dataset Project: Demographics reports the estimates of religious demographics, both country by country and region by region. The RCS was created to fulfill the unmet need for a dataset on the religious dimensions of countries of the world, with the state-year as the unit of observation. It estimates populations and percentages of adherents of 100 religious denominations including second level subdivision within Christianity and Islam. The RCS Data Project would like to acknowledge, recognize, and express our deepest gratitude for the significant contributions of Todd M. Johnson the principal investigator of the World Christian Database and the co-principal investigator of the World Religion Database.

3.  Data under the "Features of Constitution" heading are drawn from coding of the U.S. State Department's 2008 International Religious Freedom Reports conducted by researchers at the Association of Religion Data Archives. The article by Brian Grim and Roger Finke describes the coding of the International Religious Freedom reports. A dataset with these and the other international measures highlighted on the country pages can be downloaded from this website. Used with permission.

4.  The constitutional excerpts shown above are reproduced from the websites given in the "Source" field; the links to these websites were active as of May 2011. Where the constitutional text shown on these websites was provided in a language other than English, this text was translated to English by ARDA staff with assistance from web-based translation utilities such as Google Translate and Yahoo! Babel Fish. Constitutional text was converted to American English where applicable. Constitutional clauses were judged to contain religious content based largely on the standards used in the construction of the Religion and State Constitutions Dataset collected by Jonathan Fox. Emphases were added to the text by ARDA staff to highlight religious content in articles that also contain content that does not pertain to matters of religion. The data on this page were correct to the best of the knowledge of the ARDA as of the date listed in the "Current as of" field shown above. Please contact us at support@thearda.com if you are aware of any incorrect information provided on this page.

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