Cyprus
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  Preferred Religion (2015)1: Orthodox

  Majority Religion (2015)2: Orthodox (63.8%)

Religious Adherents, (2015)2

Cyprus Western Asia World
Christian (all denominations combined) 69% 5.6% 29.9%
 
  • Orthodox
  • 63.8% 3.2% 3%
     
  • Catholic
  • 3% 2.1% 15%
     
  • Protestant
  • 1.6% --- 5.6%
     
  • Anglican
  • 0.2% --- 1.2%
     
  • Pentecostal
  • 0.1% --- 2.8%
     
  • Other and Unknown Christian
  • 0.5% 0.3% 2.3%
    Muslim (all denominations combined) 24% 83.4% 22.8%
     
  • Sunni Muslim
  • 23.8% 57% 19%
     
  • Shia Muslim
  • 0.2% 24.6% 3.4%
     
  • Other and Unknown Muslim
  • < 0.1% 0.8% 0.3%
    Sikh 1.2% --- 0.4%
    Buddhist (all denominations combined) 0.6% 0.2% 6.6%
    Hindu 0.4% 0.8% 14.5%
    Jewish 0.2% 2.2% 0.2%
    Bahai 0.1% --- 0.1%
    Not Religious (incl. Atheist) 4.5% 1.2% 12%

    Religious Demography3

    The country has an area of 5,747 square miles and a population in the government-controlled area of 787,000.

    Prior to 1974, the country experienced a long period of strife between its Greek Cypriot and Turkish Cypriot communities. In response, the UN Force in Cyprus (UNFICYP) began peacekeeping operations in 1964. The island has been divided de facto since the Turkish military intervention of 1974, following a coup d'etat directed from Greece. The southern part of the island is under the control of the Government of the Republic of Cyprus, while the northern part is administered by Turkish Cypriots. In 1983 their administration proclaimed itself the "Turkish Republic of Northern Cyprus" ("TRNC"). The United States does not recognize the "TRNC," nor does any other country except Turkey. A buffer zone, or "green line," patrolled by UNFICYP, separates the two parts. In 2003 Turkish Cypriot authorities relaxed many restrictions on movement between the two communities, including abolishing all crossing fees. The new procedures led to relatively unimpeded contact between the communities and permitted Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots to visit religious sites located in the other community; however, citizens, as well as foreigners, must show identification at the buffer zone crossing points to go from one side to the other.

    According to the most recent (2001) population census, 94.8 percent of the permanent population in the government-controlled area belongs to the Autocephalous Greek Orthodox Church of Cyprus. Additionally, 1.5 percent of the population is Roman Catholic, 1 percent Protestant, 0.6 percent Muslim, 0.5 percent Maronite Catholic, 0.3 percent Armenian Orthodox, and 1.3 percent atheist, "other," or "not stated."

    There is a Buddhist temple in Nicosia. There is a synagogue in Larnaca. Both the Buddhist temple and synagogue are attended primarily by expatriates and foreign residents. The Jewish community is comprised of approximately 2,000 persons. The latter figure includes a very small number of native Jewish Cypriots and a greater number of Israeli, English, and other European Jews who are part of the expatriate community, which includes both observant and nonpracticing members.The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) has a community of 200 to 300 members; Seventh-day Adventists and Jehovah's Witnesses have communities as well.

    A 2006 opinion poll indicated that 19 percent of Greek Cypriots attended church services every Sunday, 23 percent attended once or twice a month, 35 percent only for major religious holidays and ceremonies such as weddings and funerals and 19 percent rarely attended. The remainder did not attend religious services at all.


    Sources

    1.  The Religious Characteristics of States Dataset Project: Government Religious Preference (GRP) measures government-level favoritism toward, and disfavor against, 30 religious denominations. A series of ordered categorical variables index the state's institutional favoritism in 28 different ways. The variables are combined to form five composite indices for five broad components of state-religion: official status, religious education, financial support, regulatory burdens, and freedom of practice. The five components' composites in turn are further combined into a single composite score, the GRP score. The RCS Data Project would like to acknowledge, recognize, and express our deepest gratitude for the significant contributions of Todd M. Johnson, the principal investigator of the World Christian Database, the co-principal investigator of the World Religion Database, and co-author of the World Christian Encyclopedia series.

    2.  The Religious Characteristics of States Dataset Project: Demographics reports annual estimates of religious demographics, both country by country and region by region. It estimates populations and percentages of adherents of 100 religious denominations including second level subdivisions within Christianity and Islam. The RCS Data Project would like to acknowledge, recognize, and express our deepest gratitude for the significant contributions of Todd M. Johnson, the principal investigator of the World Christian Database, the co-principal investigator of the World Religion Database, and co-author of the World Christian Encyclopedia series.

    3.  The U.S. State Department's International Religious Freedom Report is submitted to Congress annually by the Department of State in compliance with Section 102(b) of the International Religious Freedom Act (IRFA) of 1998. This report supplements the most recent Human Rights Reports by providing additional detailed information with respect to matters involving international religious freedom. It includes individual country chapters on the status of religious freedom worldwide. A dataset with these and the other international measures highlighted on the country pages can be downloaded from this website. These State Department reports are open source.

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