Measurements
  • Religious Tradition of Parents: What religious tradition are the respondent's parents? What tradition was he/she raised in? Questions are sometimes used to check for switching in respondents and sometimes used to check for agreement between parents.
  • Church Attendance of Family Members, Frequency of: How often do people in the respondent's family- spouse, parents, etc. attend religious services. Do NOT include friends.
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Father), 1971: This additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Mother), 1971: This additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Grandchild), 1971: This additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Father-in-Law), 1971: This additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Mother-in-Law), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Child), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Grandmother), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Grandfather), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Grandchild 2), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Traditional Family Ideology Scale, 1971: The Traditional Family Ideology Scale (TFI) was developed in 1955 by Daniel Levinson and Phyllis Huffman. It is a summated, 40-item scale consisting of four aspects of family life: parent-child relationships and child rearing techniques, husband and wife roles, male-female relationships, and general values.
[Viewing Matches 1-12]  (of 12 total matches in Measurement Concepts)
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