Timeline
  • Stanton, Elizabeth Cady: Elizabeth Cady Stanton (1815-1902) was a womenís rights advocate who pioneered feminist theology through her controversial biblical commentary known as the The Womanís Bible.
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ARDA Dictionary
  • Samsara:The never-ending cycle of birth, life, death and rebirth due to karma, the ethical law of cause and effect. This doctrine is found in the eastern religions of Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism and Sikhism (Prothero 2008: 244).
  • Karma:A term in Sanskrit referring both to an action and its consequences. It drives the never-ending cycle of birth, life, death, and rebirth in the eastern religions of Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, and Sikhism (Prothero 2008: 244).
  • New Testament:Canonized scripture in addition to the Old Testament that constitutes the Christian Bible. The New Testament is made up of 27 books, written roughly between 50 and 150 CE. The first four books are the gospels, which record the life of Jesus Christ. Among the gospels, the first three (Matthew, Mark, and Luke) are considered the synoptic gospels for their similarity in content, whereas the book of John is considered fairly distinct. The gospels are followed by the Acts of the Apostles, which records the development of the early Christian movement. Most of the New Testament contains letters, many of whom are attributed to the apostle Paul, while others are either anonymous or associated with other early church leaders. The New Testament ends with the book of Revelation, an apocalypse that deals with the end-times as well as with current persecution at the hands of the Romans. The New Testament was officially canonized in 367 by Bishop Athanasius of Alexandria (Smith and Green 1995: 769-770).
[Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in the ARDA Dictionary)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • The Association between Religious Beliefs and Practices and End-of-life Fears among Members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).
    Silton, Nava R., Kevin J. Flannelly, Christopher G. Elllison, Kathleen Galek, Martha R. Jacobs, John P. Marcum, and Faye J Silton (2011)
    Review of Religious Research 53:3: 357-370.

    Analyzes 2002 survey data from members of the Presbytrian Church (U.S.A.). Various measures of religiosity & church involvement were inversely related to several kinds of death anxiety.

    Associated Search Terms: Belief; Death anxiety; Practice; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.; Religiosity
  • The Context of Religious and Spiritual Care at the End of Life in Long-term Care Facilities.
    Hamilton, V. Lee; Timothy P. Daaleman, Christianna S. Williams, and Sheryl Zimmerman (2009)
    Sociology of Religion 70:2: 179-195.

    Analyzes telephone interview data from families of people who died in a sample of long-term care facilites. Importance of religion to the deceased strongly predicted spiritual care.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Death
  • Spiritual Care at the End of Life in Long-Term Care.
    Daaleman, Timothy P., Christianna S. Williams, V. Lee Hamilton, and Sheryl Zimmerman (2008)
    Medical Care 46: 85-91.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Death
  • The Social Context of Conversion to a Black Religious Sect.
    Singer, Merrill (1988)
    Review of Religious Research 30:2: 177-192.

    Based on open-ended life history interviews with a sample of Black Hebrews in Israel, apparently in 1978.

    Associated Search Terms: Israel; Conversion; Black Jews, Israel
[Viewing Matches 1-4]  (of 4 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • The Right to Die II, November 2005:
    This survey investigated Americans' opinions on end-of-life issues including euthanasia, decisions over stoppage of treatment, wills, and more. Religious variables include religious affiliation, church attendance, subjective importance of religion, and whether clergy at respondents' churches speak out on public issues, including end-of-life issues. The survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press.
    Funded By: The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 11/7/2007
  • Survey of Aging and Longevity, 2013:
    This 2013 survey examines views on and experience with end-of-life decisions, aging and quality of life in older age, medical advances and radical life extension, among other topics. It was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced multiple reports.
    Funded By: The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 2/1/2016
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2002 - End-of-Life Issues, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2002 survey focuses on end-of-life issues.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 7/21/2008
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2002 - End-of-Life Issues, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2002 survey focuses on end-of-life issues.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 7/21/2008
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2002 - End-of-Life Issues, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2002 survey focuses on end-of-life issues.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 7/21/2008
[Viewing Matches 1-5]  (of 5 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Investigators/Researchers
[Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in Investigators)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • SUICIDE4 from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Do you think a person has the right to end his or her own life if this person is tired of living and ready to die?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • SUICIDE4 from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Do you think a person has the right to end his or her own life if this person is tired of living and ready to die?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • SUICD4_2 from General Social Survey Panel Data (2006 Sample)
    Do you think a person has the right to end his or her own life if this person . . . D. Is tired of living and ready to die? (SUICIDE4_2)

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know

  • SUICD4_1 from General Social Survey Panel Data (2006 Sample)
    Do you think a person has the right to end his or her own life if this person . . . D. Is tired of living and ready to die? (SUICIDE4_1)

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • SUICD4_3 from General Social Survey Panel Data (2006 Sample)
    Do you think a person has the right to end his or her own life if this person . . . D. Is tired of living and ready to die? (SUICIDE4_3)

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • GROUPS1 from Gallup Poll of Catholics, 1999
    People belong to all kinds of groups, from bowling clubs to Knights of Columbus. We are talking about groups that have meetings which members attend, fairly regularly. Can you please tell me what groups you belong to now? Include groups that have a religious orientation, whether they are parish-based or not, as well as other groups not related to any religious denomination or orientation. (Note: Allow five responses - open-ended and code). First response.

    1) Other (list)
    2) Don't know
    3) Refused
    4) None
    6) Knights of Columbus
    7) Altar Society
    8) Bible study groups
    10) Cursillo
    11) Small Christian communities, etc.
    12) Sunday school class
    13) Prayer group
    14) Lions Club
    15) Women's clubs
    19) Neighborhood organization
    20) PTA
    21) American Legion
    22) AA
    23) Bowling
    24) Book club/Book discussion
    25) Chamber of Commerce
    26) Elks
    27) Scouts, Boy/Girl/Cub/etc.
    29) Legion of Mary
    30) Little League
    31) Parish Council
    33) School/teaching/education
    34) Senior Center/group
    35) Athletic club
    37) Sorority
    38) Sports/fitness (to include golf, tennis, martial arts, walking)
    39) VFW
    40) Volunteer (group/fire)
    41) Business group
    42) Women's guild
    43) Moose
    44) 4H
    46) Church groups
    47) Right to Life
    50) Eagles
    52) Choir/glee club
    53) Dance
    54) Automobile
    57) Singles
    58) Social/social work
    59) Music/symphony
    60) Computer clubs
    61) Youth groups/youth adults
    63) Catholic group
    67) Renew group
    68) Social justice
    69) Union
    70) Political

  • GROUPS2 from Gallup Poll of Catholics, 1999
    People belong to all kinds of groups, from bowling clubs to Knights of Columbus. We are talking about groups that have meetings which members attend, fairly regularly. Can you please tell me what groups you belong to now? Include groups that have a religious orientation, whether they are parish-based or not, as well as other groups not related to any religious denomination or orientation. (Note: Allow five responses - open-ended and code). Second response.

    1) Other (list)
    4) None
    6) Knights of Columbus
    7) Altar Society
    8) Bible study groups
    12) Sunday school class
    13) Prayer group
    15) Women's club
    17) Rotary Club
    19) Neighborhood organization
    20) PTA
    22) AA
    23) Bowling
    24) Book club/Book discussion
    25) Chamber of Commerce
    26) Elks
    30) Little League
    33) School/teaching/education
    34) Senior Center/group
    35) Athletic club
    38) Sports/fitness (to include golf, tennis, martial arts, walking)
    39) VFW
    40) Volunteer (group/fire)
    41) Business group
    43) Moose
    44) 4H
    46) Church groups
    47) Right to Life
    48) Eucharistic minister/lector
    49) Chess groups
    50) Eagles
    51) Catholic daughters
    52) Choir/glee club
    54) Automobile
    55) Rosary Society
    58) Social/social work
    61) Youth groups/youth adults
    62) Cancer groups
    63) Catholic group
    64) Alumni
    66) Retired groups (not including AARP)
    68) Social justice
    69) Union
    70) Political
    96) Unknown

  • SUICIDE4 from General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Do you think a person has the right to end his or her own life if this person is tired of living and ready to die?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • SUICIDE4 from General Social Survey, 2004
    Person has right to end own life if this person is tired of living and ready to die?

    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • SUICIDE4 from General Social Survey, 2006
    Do you think a person has the right to end his or her own life if this person . . . D. Is tired of living and ready to die?

    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 153 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
Theories
  • Cyclical Theory: Asian religions, and some classical western philosophers, believed that history consisted of an endless series of cycles: the Wheel of Life, eternal return, or eternal recurrence...
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