Site Features
  • Theories, Concepts & Measures: Theories, Concepts & Measures links major Theories to Concepts and Measures from available datasets in an interactive format.
  • ARDA Affiliate: Portraits of American Life Study, 1st Wave, 2006: The Portraits of American Life Study (PALS) is an unprecedented, multi-level panel study focused on religion in the United States, with a particular focus on capturing ethnic and racial diversity. The PALS seeks to show the impact of religion in everyday life, and ultimately the connections between religious change and other forms of change in individuals and families over the course of their lives and across generations. It includes substantive modules on family relationships, deviance, health, civic participation and volunteering, moral and social attitudes, and race and ethnic issues. In time, this panel study is expected to develop into a multi-wave longitudinal study comprising both individual and congregational level data. This study was formerly known as the Panel Study of American Religion and Ethnicity (PS-ARE).
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Site Features)
QuickStats
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in QuickStats)
Timeline
  • Bishops' Program for Social Reconstruction: The "Bishops’ Program for Social Reconstruction" (1919) was a Catholic initiative supporting guaranteed wages, health insurance, and worker protections.
  • White, Ellen Gould: Ellen Gould White (1827-1915) was the co-founder of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. She promoted Saturday as the Christian Sabbath and advocated biblically-based health initiatives.
  • Missionary Member Care Movement: Beginning in 1980, the Missionary Member Care Movement sought to reduce missionary attrition and provide more holistic care to humanitarian workers.
  • Perkins, John : Christian and social justice advocate John Perkins (1930-present) helped provide education, job skills, and health care access to the poor through his ministries.
  • Eddy, Mary Baker: Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) founded the Christian Science movement.
  • Indian Manual Training School Founded in Oregon: In 1835, Methodist missionaries established a mission and manual labor school for American Indians, which was largely unsuccessful.
  • Church of Scientology: In 1954, L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) began the Church of Scientology with teachings on how to reach a blissful "state of clear."
  • Anti-Cult Movement: In the 1960s and 1970s, the rise in new religious groups brought accusations of "brainwashing" from opposing groups, who became known as the anti-cult movement.
  • Ellen White Helps Found Seventh-day Adventists: In 1863, Ellen G. White (1827-1915), was instrumental in founding the Seventh-day Adventist Church, which worships on Saturday and believes Christ's return is imminent.
  • Antoinette Brown Ordained by Congregationalists: In 1853, Antoinette Brown (1825-1921), a woman's rights activist and abolitionist, became the first woman to be ordained by a Mainline Protestant church.
  • Hubbard, L. Ron: L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) founded Scientology, a controversial new religious movement.
  • New Thought: Beginning in the mid-19th century, the New Thought movement extolled the power of the mind and God to influence everything from healing to personal success.
  • Cayce, Edgar : Edgar Cayce (1877-1945) was a famous 20th-century psychic, clairvoyant and prophet, whose "readings" told of past lives and are credited with curing illnesses.
[Viewing Matches 1-13]  (of 13 total matches in Timelines)
Measurements
[Viewing Matches 1-4]  (of 4 total matches in Measurement Concepts)
ARDA Dictionary
  • Faith Healing:A term usually limited to the Christian practice of restoring health by means of prayer, divine power or the intervention of the Holy Spirit (Smith and Green 1995: 355).
  • Christian Science Family:Churches following the teachings of founder Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) , who believed that personal healing was the central message of Christianity. She believed that the correct interpretation of Scripture would alleviate disease, suffering, and even death according to her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (1875). The movement became more of an institution in 1879. Worship services include readings from the Bible as well as Eddy's "Science and Health." The largest group in the Christian Science family is the Church of Christ, Scientist (Smith and Green 1995: 264).
  • White, Ellen Gould (1827-1915):Ellen Gould White was the co-founder of the Seventh-day Adventist Church , along with her husband, James Springer White . She promoted Saturday as the Christian Sabbath and advocated biblically-based health initiatives. For more information on Ellen White, click here .
  • Yoga:A term meaning "union," specifically referring to union with the divine. Early forms of yoga were related to ascetic practices and Hindu philosophy, but now many use it for physical fitness and mental health. In 1893, yoga was introduced to Americans by Swami Vivekananda, the first Hindu missionary in the United States. The practice took off in the 1950s and 1960s, and now it is considered mainstream (Prothero 2008: 291).
[Viewing Matches 1-4]  (of 4 total matches in the ARDA Dictionary)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Spiritual struggles and health: Assessing the influence of socioeconomic status.
    Krause, Neal, Kenneth I. Pargament, and Gail Ironson (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:3: 620-636.

    Analyzes 2014 Landmark Spirituality and Health Survey data from the 48 contiguous U.S.A. states. Lower educational attainment predicts chronic economic difficulty, which predicts living in run-down neighborhoods, & that predicts spiritual struggles, which predict poorer health.

    Associated Search Terms: Stress; Education; Health; Spirituality; Stratification
  • Religion in public health-care institutions: U.S. and U.K. perspectives.
    Idler, Ellen, and Allan Kellehear (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:2: 234-240.

    Describes degrees of separation/fusion of religion & health care in the U.S.A. & U.K. Gives examples.

    Associated Search Terms: Hospital; Medical; Great Britain; Differentiation; United States
  • Religion as cultural models: Developing an emic measure of religiosity.
    Dengah, H.J. François, II (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:1: 104-125.

    Differential adherence, "consonance," with religious cultural norms affect health. Illustrations from 2 Brazilian Pentecostal congregations taken from 2011-12 participant observation. Uses the Duke University Religion Index.

    Associated Search Terms: Participant observation; Health; Dimensions of religiosity; Culture; Conformity; Brazil, São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto; Stress; Pentecostal, Brazil
  • The honeymoon is over: Occupational relocation and changes in mental health among United Methodist clergy.
    Eagle, David E., Andrew A. Miles, and Rae Jean Proeschold-Bell (2017)
    Review of Religious Research 59:1: 31-45.

    Analyzes 2008 & '10 panel survey data from United Methodist clergy in the U.S.A. Those who had relocated between the 2 survey waves reported less stress & higher morale.

    Associated Search Terms: Stress; United Methodist, U.S.A.; Panel study; Morale; Clergy
  • Religious pathways from adolescence to adulthood.
    Lee, Bo Hyeong Jane, Lisa D. Pearce, and Kristen M. Schorpp (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:3: 678-689.

    Analyzes waves 1,3, & 4 of the 1994-2008 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health data (U.S.A.). Identifies 7 pathways relative to religion: consistently high, consistently low, late declining, increasing, consistently affiliated but inactive, early declining, & returning.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescence; Life course; Membership; Practice; Prayer; Salience
  • The origins of religious homophily in a medium and large school.
    Cook, J. Benjamin, Philip Schwadel, and Jacob E. Cheadle (2017)
    Review of Religious Research 59:1: 65-80.

    Analyzes 1994 & '95 in-school questionnaire data from 7-12 grade students in 2 schools, larger than ones studied in the past, that were involved in he National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (U.S.A.) survey. Religion of friends affects respondents' religion, leading to homophily, in contrast to what occurs in small schools.

    Associated Search Terms: Homophily; Network; Socialization; Students, secondary
  • Religious invovlement and health over time: Predictive effects in a national sample of African Americans.
    Roth, David L., Therri Usher, Eddie M. Clark, and Cheryl L. Holt (2016)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 55:2: 417-424.

    Analyzes panel telephone interview data from adult African Americans Subjective religiosity ("belief") & behavior religious involvement predicted positive health outcomes, but the latter did not predict religiosity.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Health; Religiosity
  • Effects of religiosity dimensions on physical health across non-elderly Black and White American panels.
    Oates, Gary L. (2016)
    Review of Religious Research 58:2: 249-270.

    Analyzes U.S.A. panel data from non-elderly adults, 1986, '89, & '94. Public religiosity predicted health measures among African Americans but not among whites.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Religiosity; Panel study; Social support; Health
  • Demonic influence: The negative mental health effects of belief in demons
    Nie, Fanhao, and Daniel V.A. Olson (2016)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 55:3: 498-515.

    Analyzes 2003-08 panel National Study of Youth and Religion (US.A.) data. Belief in malevolent spirits predicts lower mental health scores among adolescents & declines in the scores in young adulthood.

    Associated Search Terms: Belief; Adolescents; Devil; Mental health; Panel study; Young adults; Youth
  • Do religiosity and spirituality really matter for social, mental, and physical health? A tale of two samples.
    Cragun, Deborah, Ryan T. Cragun, Brian Nathan, J. E. Sumerau, and Alexandra C. H. Nowakowski. (2016)
    Sociological Spectrum 36:6: 359-377.

    Associated Search Terms: Spirituality; Religiosity; Health
  • Bridging science and religion: How health-care workers as storytellers construct spiritual meanings.
    Grant, Don, Jeff Sallaz, and Cindy Cain (2016)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 55:3: 465-484.

    Analyzes questionnaire responses from nurses at a research hospital, including an open-ended question about spirituality. Explores the narrative devices hat nurses use to frame the spiritual dimension of their work in a scientific, spirituality-neutral setting.

    Associated Search Terms: Symbolic interactionism; Spirituality; Nurse; Medical; Discourse; Fuzzy-set; Lived religion
  • Family formation and returning to institutional religion in young adulthood.
    Uecker, Jeremy E., Damon Mayrl, and Samuel Stroope (2016)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 55:2: 384-406.

    Analyzes 1994-2008 U.S. panel data (Adolescent to Adult health). Family formation, especially parenting, occasions practice &, to some extent, affiliation.

    Associated Search Terms: Membership; Life cycle; Panel study; Practice; Family
  • Is this relevant? Physician perceptions, clinical relevance, and religious content in clinical interactions.
    Franzen, Aaron B. (2016)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 55:3: 438-464.

    Analyzes 2003 survey data from US physicians, merged with 2000 county-level contextual data on congregations. Salience of religion for health in the physicians' views predicts the physicians discussing religion with patients & encouraging religious coping by them.

    Associated Search Terms: Salience; Coping; Physician; Medical
  • Belief in human sinfulness, belief in experiencing divine forgiveness, and psychiatric symptoms.
    Uecker, Jeremy E., Christopher G. Ellison, Kevin J. Flannelly, and Amy M. Burdette (2016)
    Review of Religious Research 58:1: 1-26.

    Analyzes 2004 U.S.A. e-mail survey data. Finds a positive association between belief in human sinfulness & 6 psychiatric symptoms, & a negative one between belief in divine forgiveness & 6 symptoms, as well as some inetraction effects.

    Associated Search Terms: Belief; Sin; Mental health; Forgiveness
  • The long arm of religion: Childhood adversity, religion, and self-perception among Black Americans.
    Henderson, Andrea K. (2016)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 55:2: 324-348.

    Analyzes 2001-03 National Survey of America Life: Coping with Stress in the 21st Century data from African Americans & Caribbean Americans. Religious coping & attendance buffer negative long-term effect of poor childhood health & low childhood SES on self-esteem & efficacy. However, childhood religious salience ("socialization") exacerbated them.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Caribbean Americans; Life course; Salience; African Americans; Coping; Efficacy; Self-esteem
  • Bodyweight perceptions among Texas women: The effects of religion, race/ethnicity, and citizenship status.
    Ramos, Aida I., Gabriel A. Acevedo, and Andrea L. Ruiz (2016)
    Review of Religious Research 58:3: 433-455.

    Based on telephone survey data from Texas women. Attendance inversely predicts self-identification as overweight. Interaction effects with ethnic & racial categories are noted.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Texas; Ethnic; Health; Practice; Race
  • Anxious attachment to God, spiritual support, and obesity: Findings from a recent nationwide survey.
    Krause, Neal, and R. David Hayward (2016)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 55:3: 485-497.

    Analyzes 2014 interview data from adult Americans; having an anxious attachment to God predicts obesity, but the association is weakened by spiritual& emotional social support.

    Associated Search Terms: Social support; Anxiety; God, image of; Obesity; Stress; Health; Attachment to God
  • Deviating from Religious Norms and the Mental Health of Conservative Protestants.
    Mannheimer, Andrew H., and Terrence D. Hill (2015)
    Journal of Religion and Health 54:5: 1826-1838.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Conservative; Deviance/social control
  • Making the work we do more relevant: Using rleigion and health as a template.
    Krause, Neal (2015)
    Sociology of Religion 76:1: 14-29.

    The sociology of the relationship between religion & health provides a template for making the sociology of religion more relevant to the public.

    Associated Search Terms: Sociology of religion; Health
  • True believers? Religion, physiology, and perceived body weight in Texas.
    Ruiz, Andrea L., and Gabriel A. Acevedo (2015)
    Journal of Religion and Health 54:4: 1221-1237.

    Associated Search Terms: Obesity; Health; United States, Texas
  • Religious heterogeneity and suicide: A cross-national analysis.
    Moore, Matthew D. (2015)
    Social Compass 62:4: 649-663.

    Analyzes World Health Organization data & other data sets; religious heterogeneity positively predicts suicide rates.

    Associated Search Terms: Pluralism; Suicide
  • Occupational conditions, self-care, and obesity among clergy in the United States.
    Fergerson, Todd W., Brita Andercheck, Joshua C. Tom, Brandon C. Martinez, and Samuel Stroope (2015)
    Social Science Research 49: 249-263.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Clergy role; Clergy
  • Religion and global health.
    Brown, Peter J. (2014)
    In Ellen L. Idler (ed.) Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 273-297.

    Nation-level ecological data show an inverse relationship between health & religiosity, but health work is often motivated by religion & pursued by faith-based organizations.

    Associated Search Terms: Ecology; Globalization; Health
  • Religion and physical health from childhood to old age.
    Idler, Ellen L. (2014)
    In Ellen L. Idler (ed.) Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 203-250.

    Overview of studies of religion & health for different stages of the life course.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Life cycle; Life course
  • My body is a temple: Eating disturbances, religious involvement, and mental health among young adult women.
    Henderson, Andrea K., and Christopher G. Ellison (2014)
    Journal of Religion and Health 54:3: 954-976.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Women; Young adults; Health
  • Beliefs about God and mental health among American adults.
    Silton, Nava R., Kevin J. Flannelly, Kathleen Galek, and Christopher G. Ellison (2014)
    Journal of Religion and health 53;5: 1285-1296.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Belief; God, concept of; United States
  • Health benefits of religion among black and white older adults? Race, religiosity, and Creactive protein.
    Ferraro, Kenneth F., and Seoyoun Kim (2014)
    Social Science and Medicine 120:1: 92-99.

    Health benefit (resistance to inflammation) from religious involvement evident among African American seniors.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Gerontology; Health; Panel study; Practice
  • Gratitude to God, Self-rated Health, and Depressive Symptoms.
    Krause, Neal, R. David Hayward, Deborah Bruce, and Cynthia Woolever (2014)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 53:2: 341-355.

    Analyzes 2008-2009 US. Congregational Life Survey data. Practice predicts volunteering, which in turn predicts having friends in the congregation. This in turn predicts emotional support, which in turn predicts gratitude toward God. Gratitude toward God predicts self-rated health and inversely predicts depressive affect.

    Associated Search Terms: Volunteering; Social support; Depression; Gratitude; Health
  • Ingenious institutions: Religious origins of health and development organizations.
    Idler, Ellen L. (2014)
    In Ellen L. Idler (ed.) Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 319-343.

    Describes 5 innovative medical institutions that, at least in their origin, were religiously inspired.

    Associated Search Terms: Change; Dhaka Ahsania Mission; Heifer International; La Leche League; L'Arche; Medical; Shri Kshetra Dharmasthala Rural Development Programme
  • Is it really religion? Comparing main and stress-buffering effecs of religion and secular civic engagement on psychological distress.
    Acevedo, Gabriel A., Christopher G. Ellison, and Xiaohe Xu. (2014)
    Society and Mental Health 4:2: 111-128.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Civic engagement; Stress
  • Religion and early marriage in the United States: Evidence from the Add Health study.
    Ueckr, Jeremy E. (2014)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 53:2: 392-415.

    Analyzes 1991-2004 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (U.S.A.) data. Mormons & conservative Protestants marry earlier, as do those who had attended largely Mormon or conservative Protestant schools. Frequency of attendance also predicts early marriage, but inversely for Catholics. Salience & literalism predict early marriage.

    Associated Search Terms: Salience; Practice; Mormon, U.S.A.; Marriage; Literalism; Conservative, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.
  • Hatsum?de, the visitation of Shinto shrines: Religion and culture in the Japanese context.
    Ozawa-deSilva, Chikako (2014)
    In Ellen L. Idler (ed.) Religion as a Social Determinant of Public Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 71-76.

    First-hand account of performing hatsum?de, & interview interpretations of it.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Shinto; Ritual; Japan; Pilgrimage
  • Cross-national analysis of the influence of cultural norms and government restrictions on the relationship between religion and well-being.
    Hayward, R. David, and Marta Elliott (2014)
    Review of Religious Research 56:1: 23-43.

    Analyzes 5 waves (1981-2008) of World Values Survey data. Self-reported religion predicts happiness & self-reported health where religion is freely practiced, but it is harmful where there are religious restrictions & religion is deemed deviant.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Well-being; Deviance/social control; Happiness
  • Physicians in the USA: Attendance, beliefs and patient interactions.
    Franzen, Aaron B. (2014)
    Journal of Religion and Health 54:4: 1886-1900.

    Associated Search Terms: Physician
  • How Islam influences women's paid non-farm employment: Evidence from 26 Indonesian and 37 Nigerian provinces.
    Spierings, Niels (2014)
    Review of Religious Research 56:3: 399-431.

    Analyzes 2003 Demographic and Health Survey data for Indonesia & Nigeria. Muslim/Christian comparisons do not show differences in women's gainful employment, but traditionalist forms of Islam & Islamic province legislation locates women's gainful work in the home.

    Associated Search Terms: Work; Gender role; Women; Sharia; Law; Nigeria; Indonesia; Gender traditionalism; Islam, Indonesia; Islam, Nigeria
  • "Dicen que los cien soles son del Diablo": L'interprétation apocalyptique et mythique du Programa Juntos dans les communautés andines de Cajamarca (Pérou) et la critique populaire des programmes sociaux.
    Piccoli, Emmanuelle (2014)
    Social Compass 61:3: 328-347.

    The Programa Juntos aims to integrate poor families into the market economy through cash incentives for mothers and children to obtain identity documents, health services, & education. The author sees locals' interpretation of the program in diabolical terms as social critique. Based on 2005-13 field work in the Cajamarca region in the Andies.

    Associated Search Terms: Peru; Devil; Stratification
  • Prayer, attachment to God, and symptoms of anxiety-related disorders among U.S. adults.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Matt Bradshaw, Kevin J. Flannelly, and Kathleen C. Galek (2014)
    Sociology of Religion 75:2: 208-233.

    Analyzes 2010 Baylor Religion Survey (U.S.A.) data; there was no relationship between frequency of praying & anxiety symptoms. Anxious attachment to God predicted them, secure attachment to God inversely predicted them. Among those securely attached to God, frequency of prayer inversely predicts them & positively predicted them among those anxiously attached to God. See erratum Sociology of Religion 76:1:140.

    Associated Search Terms: Attachment to God; Mental health; Prayer; Anxiety
  • Sacred Stories, Spiritual Tribes. Finding Religion in Everyday Life.
    Ammerman, Nancy T. (2014)
    New York: Oxford University Press

    95 in-depth interviews in Boston & Atlanta, 2006, including life histories, & followed up with observation at worship & study groups. Disposable cameras were left with respondents for them to photograph significant places. Audio-diaries were collected.

    Associated Search Terms: Everyday life; Family; Health; Life histories; Methods; Narrative; Prayer; Spirituality; Visual; Work; Practice; Lived religion; Diaries; Discourse
  • Religion and mental health.
    Schieman, Scott, Alex Bierman, and Christopher G. Ellison (2013)
    In C.S. Aneshensel, J.C. Phelan, and A. Bierman (eds.) Handbook of the Sociology of Mental Health. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Springer, pp. 457-478.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health
  • Typologies of religiousness/spirituality: Implications for health and well-being.
    Park, Nan Sook, Beo S. Lee, Fei Sun, Dvid L. Klemmack, Lucinda L. Roff, and Harold G. Koenig (2013)
    Journal of Religion and Health 52:3: 828-839.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Spirituality; Well-being; Health
  • Religion and selected health behaviors among Latinos in Texas.
    Garcia, Ginny, Christopher G. Ellison, Thankam S. Sunil, and Terrence D. Hill (2013)
    Journal of Religion and health 52:1: 18-31.

    Associated Search Terms: Latino Americans; United States, Texas; Health
  • Spiritual struggles and mental health: Exploring the moderating effects of religious salience.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Qijuan Fang, Kevin J. Flannelly, and Rebecca A. Steckler (2013)
    International Journal for the Psychology of Religion 23: 214-229.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Salience
  • The risk of overweight and obesity among Latter-day Saints.
    Mason, Philip B., Xiaohe Xu, and John P. Bartkowski (2013)
    Review of Religious Research 55:1: 131-147.

    Analyzes 1996 Utah Health Status Survey data; LDS members who attend services, especially female, were at greater risk of obesity.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Utah; Health; Mormon, U.S.A.; Obesity
  • Prayer beliefs and change in life satisfaction over time.
    Krause, Neal, and R. David Hayward (2013)
    Journal of Religion and Health 52: 674-694.

    Associated Search Terms: Life satisfaction; Prayer
  • Church-based social support, functional disability, and change in personal control over time.
    Krause, Neal, and R. David Hayward (2013)
    Journal of Religion and Health 53:1: 267-278.

    Associated Search Terms: Social support; Control, sense of; Disability
  • Enhanced religiosity following illness? Assessing evidence of religious consolation among Black and White Americans.
    Oates, Gary L. (2013)
    Review of Religious Research 55:4: 597-613.

    Analyzes 1986 & '89 longitudinal interview data from African Americans & white Americans. Illness doe snot induce religiosity, except psychological distress among African Americans.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Coping; Health; Longitudinal
  • Racial/ethnic differences in spiritual well-being among cancer survvors.
    Canada, Andrea L., George Fitchett, Patricia E. Murphy, Kevin Stein, Kenneth Portier, Corinne Crammer, and Amy H. Peterman (2013)
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 36:5: 441-453.

    Associated Search Terms: Well-being, spiritual; Health; Ethnic
  • Medicine and spiritual healing within a region of Canada: Preliminary findings concerning Christian Scientsts' healthcare practices.
    Manca, Terra (2013)
    Medical Anthropology Quarterly 2: 121-142.

    Associated Search Terms: Healing; Canada; Christian Science, Canada; Health
  • Religion, social capital, and health.
    Yeary, Karen Hye-cheon Kim, Songthip Ounpraseuth, Page Moore, Zoran Bursac, and Paul Greene (2012)
    Review of Religious Research 54:3: 331-347.

    Analyzes 2006 telephone interview data from Americans; social capital mediates the beneficial effects of religious participation on health. (The health literature traditionally termed this "social support" rather than social capital.)

    Associated Search Terms: Health; United States; Social capital; Social support
  • Measuring intrinsic religiosity: Scales for use in mental health studies in China--a research report.
    Liu, Eric Y., and Harold G. Koenig (2012)
    Mental Health, Religion, and Culture 16:2:215-224.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity scale; Mental health; Measurement; China; Intrinsic/extrinsic
  • Measurement of religiosity/spirituality in adolescent health outcomes research: trends and recommendations.
    Cotton, Sian, Meghan E. McGrady, and Susan L. Rosenthal (2012)
    Journal of Religion and Health 49:4: 414-444.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Spirituality; Religiosity scale; Spirituality scale; Methods; Measurement; Adolescence; Health
  • Maternal religious involvement and breastfeeding initiation and duration.
    Burdetre, Amy M., and Natasha V. Pilkauskas (2012)
    American Journal of Public Health 102:10: 1865-1868.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Women
  • Belief in life-after-death, beliefs about the world, and psychiatric symptoms.
    Flannelly, Kevin J., Christopher G. Ellison, Kathleen Galek, and Nava R. Silton (2012)
    Journal of Religion and Health 51:10: 651-662.

    Associated Search Terms: Belief; Mental health; Afterlife
  • The effect of religion-supported programs on health-related behaviors in adolescence.
    Adamczyk, Amy, and Jacob Felson (2012)
    Review of Religious Research 54:4: 469-497.

    Analyzes 2002-05 telephone interview data from U.S.A. teenagers. Involvement in religiously-sponsored non-religious activities is related to more positive outcomes, compared to participation in similar non-religiously sponsored activities.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Well-being; Adolescents; Health; Sexual activity
  • Faith aftre an earthquake: A longitudinal study of religion and perceived health before and after the 2011 Chistchurch New Zealand earthquake.
    Sibley, Chris G., and Joseph Bulbulia (2012)
    PloS One 7:12: e49648.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; New Zealand, Christchurch; Disaster
  • Forced Termination of American Clergy: Its Effects and Connection to Negative well-being.
    Tanner, Marcus N., Anisa M. Zvonkovic, and Charlie Adams (2012)
    Review of Religious Research 54:1: 1-17.

    Analyzes internet questionnaire data from a snowball sample of Protestant American clergy; 28% had been forced from a ministry position at least once in their careers; they had poorer health than others & lower self-esteem, & were more likely to experience emotional exhaustion.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Clergy; Health; Stress; Self-esteem; Mental health
  • Interactive effects of church attendance and religious tradition on depressive symptoms and positive affect.
    Schwadel, Philip, and Christina D. Falci (2012)
    Society and Mental Health 2: 21-34.

    Associated Search Terms: Affect; Denomination (organizational entity); Depression; Practice
  • Validation of the Duke Religion Index: DUREL (Portuguese version).
    Lucchetti, Giancarlo, Alessandra Lamas Granero Lucchetti, Mario F. Peres, Frederico C. Leão, Alexander Moreira-Almeida, and Harold G. Koenig (2012)
    Journal of Religion and Health 51:2: 579-586.

    As the title indicates, it is technically an index, not a scale.

    Associated Search Terms: Scale
  • Constructing profiles of religious agreement and disagreement between adolescents and mothers: A research note.
    Noonan, Anne E., Allison Tracy, and Jennifer M. Grossman (2012)
    Review of Religious Research 54:2: 239-254.

    Analyzes interview data from adolescents & mothers in Wave 1 (1994-95) of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health survey (U.S.A.). Develops a typology of child/mother relationships based on religious items.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Dyad; Family; Practice; Prayer; Salience
  • Maternal religious attendance and low birth weight.
    Burdette, Amy M., Janet Weeks, Terrence D. Hill, and Isaac W. Eberstein (2012)
    Social Science & Medicine 74:12: 1961-1967.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Women; Practice
  • Religious beliefs, diet, and physical activity among Jewish adolescents.
    Benjamins, Maureen R. (2012)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 51:3: 588-597.

    Analyzes 2010 questionnaire data from 5th-8th grade children in an Orthodox Jewish school system; those who said religious beliefs influenced their decisions about being physically active a lot were more active. No such effects were shown for eating behavior.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Jewish; Obesity; Students, primary
  • The effect of religious-based mentoring on educational attainment: More than just a spiritual high?
    Erickson, Lance D., and James W. Phillips (2012)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 51:3: 568-587.

    Analyzes 1994-2008 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (U.S.A.) interview data. Religious youth are more likely to complete high school & enroll in college, net of other factors. Informal mentoring, especially by religious figures, plays an important role in college enrollment.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy influence; Education; United States; Mentor
  • Attachment to God, Stressful Life Events, and Changes in Psychological Distress.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Matt Bradshaw, Nilay Kuyel, and Jack P. Marcum (2012)
    Review of Religious Research 53:4: 493-511.

    Analyzes 2005 questionnaire data from members of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. Secure attachment to God buffers the effects of stress while an anxious attachment t God exacerbates them.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.; Stress; Panel study; God, attachment to
  • Religion and AIDS in Africa.
    Trinitapoli, Jenny, and Alexander Weinreb. (2012)
    New York: Oxford University Press.

    Interview & other kinds of data from Malawi, seacondary analysis of data from other sub-Saharan nations. While "new mission Protestant" churches have a lower incidence of AIDS, the best predictor is religiosity, not affiliation; individual & especially village religiosity inversely predicts HIV+ for women, but is positively associated for men.

    Associated Search Terms: Healing; Malawi; Africa; Stigma; Religiosity; Network; Sex; Islam, Africa; Sexual activity; AIDS; Christian, Africa; Contextual effects; Health
  • Religion and Health in Japan: Past Research, New Findings, and Future Directions.
    Roemer, Michael K. (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 115-140.

    Overview of studies of religion & health in Japan. Analyzes survey data from Kyoto, showing favorable & unfavorable effects of various kinds & dimensions of religion on health.

    Associated Search Terms: Japan, Kyoto; Health
  • The Recondite Religious Life of Health.
    Blasi, Anthony J. (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 261-271.

    Because religion is oriented to the non-empirical, it cannot have its effects on health if consciously used instrumentally. Thus the effects can be seen as latent micro functions.

    Associated Search Terms: Latent function; Health
  • Transcendent Experience and Health: Concepts, Cases, and Sociological Themes.
    Levin, Jeffrey S. (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 69-93.

    Considers the role of experience of the transcendent in generating positive health outcomes.

    Associated Search Terms: Experiential dimension; Yoga; Transcendence; Meditation; Health; Healing; Experience
  • Religious Involvement and Latino Immigrant Health.
    Shapiro, Ephraim (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 175-205.

    Analyzes 1st wave data (2003) from the New Immigrant Survey, from first generation adult immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, & Guatemala who self-identify as Christians. Attendance predicted favorable results for health behaviors (smoking, binge drinking, physical activity) but was unrelated to obesity.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Latino Americans; Health; Social capital; Smoking; Migrant
  • Religion and Mental Health: Through the Lens of the Stress Process.
    Ellison, Christopher G., and Andrea K. Henderson (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 11-44.

    Presents the stress process model of the relationship among religion, stress, and mental health outcomes. Religion can limit exposure to stressors, help provide social resources, provide psychological resources, be a part of coping, or cause stress.

    Associated Search Terms: Coping; Stress; Mental health; Social support
  • Judaism and health: Reflections on an emerging scholarly field.
    Levin, Jeffrey S., and Michelle F. Prince (2011)
    Journal of Religion and Health 50:4: 765-777.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Jewish
  • Religion and Mental Health in China.
    Liu, Eric Y. (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 141-173.

    Analyzes 2007 Empirical Studies of Values in China data; private religiosity positively predicts life satisfaction, but public religious involvement, membership, or belief do not. Religious effects differ from patterns found in the West.

    Associated Search Terms: Life satisfaction; Mental health; China
  • Religiosity, Psychological Resources, and Physical Health.
    Son, Joonmo, and John Wilson (2011)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 50:3: 588-603.

    Analyzes 1995 & follow-up 2004 & '06 telephone interview data from Americans; emotional & psychological well-being mediate the effects of home religiosity on self-reported health & physical symptoms, 2 measures that have a psychological component. Religion had no effects on more objective measures of physical health.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Religiosity; United States
  • Stress, Religious-based Coping, and Physical Health.
    Krause, Neal (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 208-237.

    General conceptualization of the role of rleigion in buffering stress & coping with it. Focuses on church-based social support, religious coping responses, prayer, religiously-oriented feelings of control, & a religious sense of meaning in life.

    Associated Search Terms: Social support; Stress; Coping; Health; Meaning; Control, sense of; Prayer
  • Psychosocial Health and Spirituality of Theology Students and Pastors of the German Seventh-day Adventist Church.
    Voltmer, Edgar, Christine Thomas, and Claudia Spahn (2011)
    Review of Religious Research 52:3: 290-305.

    2007-08 survey data from German Seventh-day Adventist theology students & pastors show physical health but low scores on mental health.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Mental health; Seventh-day Adventist, Germany; Clergy; Seminarians
  • Health Impact of Jewish Religious Observance in the USA: Findings from the 2000-2001 National Jewish Population Survey.
    Levin, Jeffrey S. (2011)
    Journal of Religion and Health 4: 1-17.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Jewish, U.S.A.; Practice
  • Social relationships in religious institutions and healthy lifestyles.
    Krause, Neal, Benjamin Shaw, and Jersey Liang (2011)
    Health Education and Behavor 38:1: 25-38.

    Associated Search Terms: Health
  • Religious involvement, religious context, and self-assessed health in Europe.
    Huijts, Tim, and Gerbert Kraaykamp (2011)
    Journal of Helath and Social Behavior 52: 91-106.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Europe
  • Religious affiliation and hispanic health in Utah.
    Mason, Philip B., Michael B. Toney, and Youngtae Cho (2011)
    Social Science Journal 48: 175-192.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Latino Americans; United States, Utah
  • Fighting down the scourge, building up the church: Organizational constraints in religious involvement with HIV/AIDS in Mozambique.
    Agadjanian, Victor, and Cecilia Menjívar (2011)
    Global Public Health Special Issue on Religious Responses to HIV and AIDS S148-S162.

    Associated Search Terms: Mozambique; AIDS; Health
  • Religious social capital: Its measurement and utility in the study of the social determinants of health.
    Maselko, Joanna, Cacey Hughes, and Rose Cheney (2011)
    Social Science and Medicine 73:5: 759-767.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Measurement; Social capital
  • Forced to Leave: Forced Termination Experiences of Assemblies of God Clergy and its Connection to Stress and Well-being Outcomes.
    Tanner, Marcus, and Anisa Zvonkovic (2011)
    Pastoral Pscychology 60:5: 713.

    On-line survey data show ministers who had been forced from a ministry position had less family well-being & more health problems than others.

    Associated Search Terms: Assemblies of God; Health; Clergy; Family
  • Work-related Psychological Health among Clergy Serving in the Presbyterian Church (USA): Testing the Idea of Balanced Affect.
    Francis, Leslie J., Andrew Village, Mandy Robbins, and Keith Wulff (2011)
    Review of Religious Research 53:1: 9-22.

    Analyzes 2006 questionnaire data from Presbyterian (U.S.A.) clergy. Positive effect cannot compeltely compensate for negative effect.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Burnout; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.
  • Religious Involvement and Religious Struggles.
    Hill, Terrence D., and Ryon J. Cobb (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 239-260.

    Reviews the literature & develops a theoretical model for the relationship between religion & longevity.

    Associated Search Terms: Belief; Mortality; Conversion; Depression; Mental health; Self-esteem; Social support; Doubt
  • The Role of Divine Beliefs in Stress Processes.
    Schieman, Scott, and Alex Bierman (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 45-68.

    Consideration of beliefs about God as a moderating influence between stressors and well-being.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; God, emotions toward; God, concept of; Belief; Well-being, psychological; Stress; God, image of
  • Does Religion Protect Against Psychological Distress Among Chronically Ill and poor Women?
    Kilbourne, Barbara, Sherry M. Cummings, and Robert S. Levine (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 95-114.

    Analyzes interview data from low-income female patients in a Nashville, Tennessee, clinic. Dimensions of religion, arrived at through factor analysis, have modest but significant inverse effects on depression.

    Associated Search Terms: Factor analysis; Dimensions of religiosity; Women; United States, Tennessee, Nashville; Poverty; Mental health; Medical; Depression; Stress
  • Social norms and the relationship between cigarette use and religiosity among adolescents in the United States.
    Gryczynski, Jan, and Brian W. Ward (2011)
    Health Education & Behavior 38:1: 39-48.

    Associated Search Terms: Norm; Tobacco; Adolescents
  • The third therapeutic system: Faith healing strategies in the context of a generalized AIDS epidemic.
    Manglos, Nicolette D., and Jenny Trinitapoli (2011)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 52: 107-122.

    Associated Search Terms: AIDS; Healing
  • What do chaplains contribute to large academic hospitals? The perspectives of pediatric physicians and chaplains.
    Cadge, Wendy, Katherine Calle, and Jennifer Dillinger (2011)
    Journal of Religion and Health 50:2: 300-312.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Chaplain
  • A methodological analysis of chaplaincy research: 2000-2009.
    Galek, Kathleen, Kevin J. Flannelly, Katherine R.B. Jankowski, and George Handzo (2011)
    Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 17:3-4: 126-145.

    Associated Search Terms: Methodology; Hospital chaplain
  • Do church-based social relationships influence social relationships in the secular world?
    Krause, Neal (2011)
    Mental Health, Religion and Culture 14: 877-897.

    Associated Search Terms: Network
  • Non-organizational religious participation, subjective religiosity, and spirituality among older African Aemrican and black Caribbeans.
    Taylor, Robert Joseph, Linda M. Chatters, and Sean Joe. (2011)
    Journal of Religion and Health 50:3: 623-645.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity, private; Gerontology; African Americans; Caribbean Americans
  • The association of religion and virginity status among Brazilian adolescents.
    Ogland, Curtis P., Xiaohe Xu, John P. Bartkowski, and Emmanuelle G. Ogland (2011)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 48:6: 651-653.

    Associated Search Terms: Sexual activity; Brazil; Adolescents
  • Jewish physicians' beliefs and practices regarding religion/spirituality in the clinical encounter.
    Stern, Robert M., Kenneth A. Raskinski, and Farr A. Curlin (2011)
    Journal of Religion and Health 50:4: 806-817.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, U.S.A.; Physician; Medical
  • Religion and adult mortality: Group- and individual-level perspectives.
    Idler, Ellen L. (2011)
    In Richard Rogers and Eileen Crimmins (eds.) International Handbook of Adult Mortality. New York: Springer, pp. 345-377.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Health
  • Religion and Gambling among Young Adults in the United States: Moral Communities and the Deterrence Hypothesis.
    Eitle, David (2011)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 50:1: 61-81.

    Analyzes 3rd wave data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (U.S.A.). Attendance is inversely associated with problem gambling in high attendance counties, but the number of conservative Protestants per capita positively correlates with it.

    Associated Search Terms: Ecology; Gambling; United States
  • The Perceived Prayers of Others, Stress, and Change in Depressive Symptoms Over Time.
    Krause, Neal (2011)
    Review of Religious Research 53:3: 341-356.

    Analyzes 2005 & '07 interview data from American seniors from the 48 contiguous states. The depression occasioned by living in a delapidated neighborhood is reduced for those who believe others often prayer for them.

    Associated Search Terms: Prayer; Depression; Mental health; Gerontology
  • Le Mindfulness ou la méditation pour la guérison et la croissance personnelle: des bricolages psychospirituels dans la médicines mentale.
    Garnoussi, nadia (2011)
    Sociologie 3:2: 259-275.

    Associated Search Terms: Healing; Psychology; Mental health; Meditation
  • Religion and Preventive Service Use: Do Congregational Support and Religious Beliefs Explain the Relationship Between Attendance and Utilization?
    Benjamins, Maureen R., Christopher G. Ellison, Neal M. Krause, and John P. Marcum (2011)
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 34:6: 462-476.

    Associated Search Terms: Social support; Health; Practice; Belief
  • Longitudinal relationships of religious worship attendance and spirituality with major depression, anxiety disorders, and suicidal ideation and attempts: Findings from the Baltimore Epidemiologic Catchment Areas Survey.
    Rasic, Daniel, Jennifer A. Robnson, James Bolton, O. Joseph Bienvenu, and Jitender Sareen (2011)
    Journal of Psychiatric Research 45:6: 848-854.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Practice; Spirituality; Suicide; Mental health
  • Religion and Infant Mortality in the U.S.: A Preliminary Study of Denominational Variations.
    Bartkowski, John P., Xiaohe Xu, and Ginny E. Garcia (2011)
    Religions 2:3: 264-276. www.mdpi.com/journal/religions

    U.S. county-level data show conservative Protestant & Catholic contexts are associated with lower infant morality rates, Pentecostal with higher.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, U.S.A.; Health; Infant mortality; Conservative/liberal; Pentecostal, U.S.A.
  • Religious Doubts and Sleep Quality: Findings from a Nationwide Study of Presbyterians.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Matt Bradshaw, Jennifer Storch, Jack P. Marcum, and Terrence D. Hill (2011)
    Review of Religious Research 53:2: 119-136.

    Analyzes survey data from members of the Presbytrian Church (U.S.A.); shows moderate support for the thesis that religious doubt is associated with stress & therefore with sleep deprivation.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Doubt; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.; Belief; Stress
  • Religion and the New Immigrants. Impact on Health Behaviors and Access to Health Care.
    Ebaugh, Helen Rose (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Popualtion-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 385-400.

    Suggests that immigrant religious organizations could be important agents for informing migrants about & legitimating health services.

    Associated Search Terms: Migrant; Health; United States
  • Jewish Identity and Self-reported Health.
    Eberstein, Isaac W., and Kathleen M. Heyman (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 349-367.

    Analyzes 2000-01 telephone interview data from adult American Jews. Jewish identity measures & observance are positively related to self-reported health. Observance mediates the identity/health relationship.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Jewish, U.S.A.; Identity; Health
  • Religion and Physical Health among U.S. Adults.
    Musick, Marc A., and Meredith G.F. Worthen (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 248-272.

    Analyzes 1986-94 panel interview & telephone interview ('98) data from adult Americans. Tests a number of models; generally supports the thesis that religion has modest favorable effects on health.

    Associated Search Terms: Panel study; Health; United States
  • High-cost Religion, Religious Switching, and Health.
    Scheitle, Christopher P., and Amy Adamcyk (2010)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 51:3: 325-342.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Health; Conversion
  • Race, Religious Involvement, and Health. The Case of African Americans.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Robert A. Hummer, Amy M. Burdette, and Maureen R. Benjamins (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers Univrsity Press, pp. 321-348.

    A review of the literature.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Health
  • Collective Rituals or Private Practice in Texas? Assessing the Impact of Religious Factor on Mental Health.
    Acevedo, Gabriel A. (2010)
    Review of Religious Research 52:2: 188-206.

    Analyzes 2004 Texas survey data; collective religious activity predicts favorabe mental health measures, indivdualistic unfavorable.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Texas; Religiosity, collective; Religiosity; Mental health; Religiosity, private
  • Religious Belief and Mental Health: Applications and Extensions of the Stress Process Model.
    Schieman, Scott (2010)
    In David Pilgrim, Ann Rogers, and Bernice Pescosolido (eds.) The Sage Handbook of Mental Health and Illness. Thousand Oaks, California: Sage, pp. 179-210.

    Associated Search Terms: Stress; Mental health; Belief
  • Church-based Social Relationships, Belonging, and Health Among Older Mexican Americans.
    Krause, Neal, and Elena Bastida (2010)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 50:2: 397-409.

    Analyzes 2009 interview data from odler Mexican Americans in 5 Southwest U.S.A. states; frequent attenders gain a sense of belonging that has beneficial health effects.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Social support; Practice; Mexican Americans; Gerontology
  • Religion, Sexually Risky Behavior, and Reproductive Health. The Mormon Case.
    Heaton, Tim B. (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 368-384.

    Analyzes 1995 interview data from American females aged 15-44. Finds net religious affiliation effects for abortion & sexually transmittted diseases, but not for unwanted pregnancies & HIV. The data set included enough Mormons to allow for meaningful findings for them as well as other groups.

    Associated Search Terms: Fundamentalist, U.S.A.; Mormon, U.S.A.; Protestant (mainline), U.S.A..; Jewish, U.S.A.; Sexual activity; Family; Catholic, U.S.A.; Women; AIDS; Abortion; Health
  • Religion, spirituality, health, and medicine: Sociological intersections.
    Cadge, Wendy, and Brian Fair (2010)
    In Chloe Byrd, Allan Fremont, Stefan Timmermans, and Peter Conrad (eds.) Handbook of Medical Sociology. Nashville, Tennessee: Vanderbilt University Press, pp. 341-362.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Medical
  • A culturally appropriate school wellness initiative: Results of a two-year pilot intervention in two Jewish schools.
    Benjamins, Maureen R., and Steven Whitman (2010)
    Journal of School Health 80:8: 378-386.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Education; Jewish
  • Beliefs about God, Psychiatric Symptoms, and Evolutionary Psychiatry.
    Flannelly, Kevin J., Kathleen Galek, Christopher G. Ellison, and Harold G. Koenig (2010)
    Journal of Religion and Health 49: 246-261.

    Associated Search Terms: God, concept of; Mental health
  • Religion and mental health among older adults: Do the effects of religious involvement vary by gender?
    McFarland, Michael J. (2010)
    Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences 65B: 621-630.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Mental health; Gender
  • Religious resources, spiritual struggles, and mental health in a nationwide sample of PCUSA clergy.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Lori A. Roalson, Janelle M. Guillory, Kevin J. Flannelly, and John P. Marcum (2010)
    Pastoral Psychology 59:3: 287-304.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.; Clergy
  • Work-Related Psychological Health and Psychological Type Among Church of England Clergywomen.
    Robbins, Mandy, and Leslie J. Francis (2010)
    Review of Religious Research 52:1: 57-71.

    Analyzes survey (psychological instruments) data from Church of England clergy women.

    Associated Search Terms: Burnout; Women; Clergy; Mental health; Church of England
  • Religious Involvement and Mortality Risk Among Pre-retirement Aged U.S. Adults.
    Hummer, Robert A., Maureen R. Benjamins, Christopher G. Ellison, and Richard G. Rogers (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religon, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 273-291.

    Focuses on American respondents aged 51-61 in 1992, an age range in which mortality is often preventable. Tracks respondents up to 2000. With statistical controls, attendance was still related inversely with death.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Health; Practice
  • Religious Attendance and Cause-specific Mortality in the United States.
    Rogers, Richard G., Patrick M. Krueger, and Robert A. Hummer (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, ppp. 292-320.

    Analyzes 1987 American interview data from adults. Attendance predicts net lower rates of mortality & lower rates for specific causes (ischemic heart disease, respiratory disease, external causes, & residual causes). Additional findings varied with gender.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Practice; Health; United States
  • Religion and Adolescent Sexual Behavior.
    Regnerus, Mark D. (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 61-85.

    Based on 1994 & '95 American survey data (Add Health) & 2002 National Survey of Youth Religion data. Religion lessens the likelihood of adolescent sexual activity, but indirectly through a norm-supporting environment. Sexual activity among adolescents has an inverse effect on religiosity.

    Associated Search Terms: Sexual activity; Adolescents
  • Religion and Depressive Symptoms in Late Life.
    Krause, Neal (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 229-247.

    Analyzes 2001 inteview data from American seniors. Church-based social support enhances a sense of meaning in life which in turn inversely affects depression symptoms.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Social support; Meaning; Gerontology; Depression
  • Unforgivenes, rumination, and depressive symptoms among older adults.
    Ingersoll-Dayton, Berit, Cynthia Torges, and Neal Krause (2010)
    Aging & Mental Health 14: 439-449.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Forgiveness; Gerontology
  • Religiousness and blood donation.
    Gillum, Richard Frank, and Kevin S. Masters (2010)
    Journal of Health Psychology 15: 163-172.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Altruism
  • Depression, anxiety, and religious life: A search for mediators.
    Sternthal, Michelle J., David R. Williams, Marc A. Musick, and Anna C. Buck (2010)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 51:3: 343-359.

    Associated Search Terms: Anxiety; Depression
  • The perceived relationship between life events and religiosity among individuals raised in a Mormon community.
    Chou, Hui-Tzu Grace (2010)
    Mental Health, Religion, and Culture 13:5: 437-451.

    Associated Search Terms: Life course; Religiosity; Mormon, U.S.A.; Students, undergraduate
  • Mortality Differentials and Religion in the United States: Religious Affiliation and Attendance.
    Sullivan, Allison R. (2010)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 49:4: 740-753.

    Analyzes Health and Retirement Study data (1992-2006); Catholics, Evangelicals, & Black Protestants benefit from attendance.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Denomination (organizational entity); Mortality; Medical
  • Sexual minority young adult religiosity, sexual orientation conflict, self-esteem and depressive symptoms.
    Dahl, Angie, and Renee Galliher (2010)
    Journal of Gay and Lesbian Mental Health 14:4: 271-290.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Dimensions of religiosity; Homosexuality; Self-esteem; Young adults
  • Religious coping and physiological, psychological, social and spiritual outcomes in patients with HIV/IDS: Cross-sectional and longitudinal findings.
    Trevino, K.M., Kenneth I. Pargament, Sian Cotton, Anthony C. Leonard, June Hahn, Carol Ann Caprini-Faigin, and Joel Tsevat (2010)
    AIDS Behavior 14:2: 379-389.

    Associated Search Terms: Longitudinal; Coping; Health; AIDS
  • Religion and Child-Rearing.
    Alwin, Duane F., and Jacob L. Felson (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 40-60.

    A review of the literature.

    Associated Search Terms: Family; Socialization
  • Religion and the Timing of First Births in the United States.
    Pearce, Lisa D. (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (ed.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 19-39.

    Analyzes 1979-2000 panel data from a U.S.A. sample aged 14-22 in 1979. Those reared Catholic & Evangelical were more likely to have pre-marital births; attendance negatively predicts that & first marital births.

    Associated Search Terms: Fertility; Panel study; Sexual activity
  • The Influence of Religion on Ties between the Generations.
    King, Valarie (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 86-105.

    Analyzes 1983-97 American telephone interview panel data from married persons & their children. Religious fathers have a higher quality of relationship with their adult children.

    Associated Search Terms: Panel study; Generations; Family
  • Religion and Family Values Reconsidered. Gender Traditionalism among Conservative Protestants.
    Bartkowski, John P., and Xiaohe Xu (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 106-125.

    Analyzes 1988-96 National (U.S.A.) Survey of Families and Households data. Biblical inerrancy views & attendance predict gender role traditionalism. Maternalist ideology persists over time more than does separate spheres ideology. Denominational affiliation only has effects through inerrancy views & attendance.

    Associated Search Terms: Family; United States; Practice; Panel study; Literalism; Denomination (organizational entity); Gender; Inerrant
  • Religious Intermarriage and Conversion in the United States. Patterns and Changes Over Time.
    Waite, Linda J., and Alisa C. Lewin (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 148-163.

    Analyzes 1987-88 National (U.S.A.) Survey of Families and Households data. Religious homogamy correlates with marital stability, but is becoming less common over time.

    Associated Search Terms: Marriage; United States; Conversion
  • The Religious Demography of the United States. Dynamics of Affiliation, Participation, and Belief.
    Sherkat, Darren E. (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States, New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 403-430.

    Based on 1973-2002 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Membership; Demography
  • From Generation to Generation. Religious Involvement and Attitudes toward Family and Pro-Family Outcomes among U.S. Catholics.
    Burdette, Amy M., and Teresa A. Sullivan (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 126-147.

    Analyzes 1974-2004 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data from white non-Latino Catholics. There is a trend toward smaller preferred family size & a liberalization of attitudes about family, except with regard to extra-marital affairs & abortion, but declines in religious involvement counter the trend in abortion attitudes.

    Associated Search Terms: Sexual attitudes; Homosexuality; Generations; Family size; Family; Catholic, U.S.A.; Abortion
  • Religion, Family, and Women's Employment among Muslim and Christian Arab Americans.
    Read, Jen'nan Ghazal (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 206-225.

    Analyzes 2000 questionnaire data from Arab American women. Muslim affiliation is less important than degree of religiosity in suppressing labor force participation, & the degree of religiosity has important effects only for women having childrne in the home.

    Associated Search Terms: Family; Arab Americans; Economic; Islam, U.S.A.
  • Religious Affiliation and Participation as Determinants of Women's Educational Attainment and Wages.
    Lehrer, Evelyn L. (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (eds.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 186-205.

    Analyzes 1995 survey data from American women. Jewish religiosity predicts more educational attainment & income, conservative Protestant less.

    Associated Search Terms: Conservative, U.S.A.; Economic; Education; Jewish, U.S.A.; Stratification; Women
  • Childhood Religious Denomination and Early Adult Asset Accumulation.
    Keister, Lisa A. (2010)
    In Christopher G. Ellison and Robert A. Hummer (ed.) Religion, Families, and Health. Population-Based Research in the United States. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, pp. 164-185.

    Analyzes 1985-2000 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (U.S.A.) data. Jews accumulated more wealth, though less so in home ownership, while conservative Protestants accumulated less, net of statistical controls.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, U.S.A.; Conservative, U.S.A.; Economic; Stratification; Young adults
  • Religion and Psychological Distress in Japan.
    Roemer, Michael K. (2010)
    Social Forces 89: 559-584.

    Analyzes survey data from Kyoto Prefecture.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Stress; Japan, Kyoto; Depression
  • AIDS, Sexuality, and the Black Church: Making the Wounded Whole.
    Harris, Angelique (2010)
    New York: Peter Lang.

    Associated Search Terms: AIDS; African Americans; United States, New York, New York; Health
  • Does religiosity affect health risk behaviors in pregnant and postpartum women?
    Page, Robin L., Christopher G. Ellison, and Jinwoo Lee (2009)
    Maternal and Child Health Journal 13:5: 621-632.

    Associated Search Terms: Women; Risk preference; Health
  • Church-based volunteering, providing informal support at church, and self-rated health in late life.
    Krause, Neal (2009)
    Journal of Aging and Health 21:1: 63-84.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Health; Social support; Volunteering
  • Health and Missionary Service among Senior Couples in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.
    Merrill, Ray M., Randy K. Baker, Lisa H. Gren, and Joseph L. Lyon (2009)
    Review of Religious Research 51:2: 156-165.

    Uses health insurance data to examine the relationship between health status & missionary volunteering among older U.S. Mormons.

    Associated Search Terms: Mormon, U.S.A.; Missionary; Health
  • Close Companion Friends in Church and Health in Late Life.
    Krause, Neal, and John Cairney (2009)
    Review of Religious Research 51:2: 181-200.

    Analyzes survey data from U.S.A. seniors; having friends in a congregation enhances a feeling of belongingness, thereby a feeling of gratefulness to God, & thereby a higher self-rating of health.

    Associated Search Terms: Friendship; Parish; Gerontology; Health
  • The Influence of Religiosity on Depression among Low-Income People with Diabetes.
    Kilbourne, Barbara, Sherry M. Cummings, and Robert S. Levine (2009)
    Health and Social Work 34: 137-147.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Stress; Poverty; Medical; Mental health
  • Research on religion, spirituality, and mental health: A review.
    Koenig, Harold G. (2009)
    Canadian Journal of Psychiatry 54:5: 283-291.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Spirituality
  • US religious congregations and the sponsorship of health-related programs.
    Trinitapoli, Jenny, Christopher G. Ellison, and Jason D. Boardman (2009)
    Social Science and Medicine 68:12: 2231-2239.

    Associated Search Terms: Parish; Health; Congregation; United States
  • The Doubting Process: A Longitudinal Study of the Precipitants and Consequences of Religious Doubt in Older Adults.
    Krause, Neal, and Christopher G. Ellison (2009)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48:2: 293-312.

    Analyzes 2001 & '04 interview data from Americans aged 66+. Negative congregation experience is associated with more doubt. Doubt, if suppressed, is associated with worse health.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Doubt; Belief; Health; Parish
  • Religion, Spirituality, and Health. An Institutional Approach.
    Cadge, Wendy (2009)
    In Peter B. Clarke (ed.) The Oxford Handbook of the Sociology of Religion. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 836-856.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Nurse; Physician; Hospital chaplain
  • Understanding the Effects of Personal and School Religiosity on the Decision to Abort a Premarital Pregnancy.
    Adamczyk, Amy (2009)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50:2: 180-195.

    Associated Search Terms: Abortion; Education; Religiosity; Religiosity, collective
  • Religiosity and life satisfaction across nations.
    Okulicz-Kozaryn, Adam (2009)
    Mental Health, Religion & Culture 13:2: 155-169.

    Associated Search Terms: Life satisfaction
  • Do formal Religious Participation and Spiritual Perceptions Have Independent Linkages with Diverse Dimensions of Psychological well-being?
    Greenfield, Emily A., George E. Vaillant, and Nadine F. Marks (2009)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 50: 196-212.

    Associated Search Terms: Well-being, psychological; Practice
  • Smokeless tobacco use and religiousness.
    Gillum, Richard Frank, Thomas O. Obisesan, and Nicole C. Jarrett (2009)
    International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 6:1: 225-231.

    Associated Search Terms: Tobacco
  • My Body is a Testimony: Appearance, Health, and Sin in an Evangelical Weight-loss Program.
    Gerber, Lynne (2009)
    Social Compass 56:3: 405-418.

    Based on interviews, participant observation, & other forms of qualitative research on First Place, an Evangelical weight loss program.

    Associated Search Terms: Weight loss; Body; Evangelical, U.S.A.
  • Religious Affiliation, Ethnicity, and Child Mortality in Chiapas, México.
    Vargas Valle, Eunice D., Leticia Fernández, and Joseph E. Potter (2009)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48:3:588-603.

    Analyzes 2000 census data; Presbyterian indigenous people had lower child mortality rate than other indigenous people, presumably because of a Presbyterian health ministry.

    Associated Search Terms: Mexico, Chiapas; Mortality; Denomination (organizational entity); Children
  • Looking inside the black box of "attendance at services": New measures for exploring an old dimension in religion and health research.
    Idler, Ellen L., David A. Boulifard, Erich Labouvie, Yung Y. Chen, Tyrone J. Krause, and Richard J. Contrada (2009)
    International Journal for the Psychology of Religion 19: 1-20.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice
  • Serving God and Country? Religious Involvement and Military Service among Young Adult Men.
    Burdette, Amy M., Victor Wang, Glen H. Elder, Terrence D. Hill, and Janel Benson (2009)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 48:4: 794-804.

    Analyzes 1990s survey data for U.S.A. adoelscents (Add Health). Higher religious Evangelical adolescents were more likely to enter the military than the non-religious & the highly religious non-evangelical.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Peace/war; Military; Panel study
  • An Examination of the Relationship between Multiple Dimensions of Religiosity, Blood Pressure, and Hypertension
    Buck, Anna C., David R. Williams, Marc A. Musick, and Michelle J. Sternthal. (2009)
    Social Science and Medicine 68: 314-322.

    Associated Search Terms: Dimensions of religiosity; Health
  • Religious Service Attendance and Distress: The Moderating Role of Stressful Life Events and Race/Ethicity.
    Tabak, Melanie A., and Kristin D. Mickelson (2009)
    Sociology of Religion 70:1: 49-64.

    Secondary analysis of early 1990s interview data from non-institutionalized adults in the contiguous U.S.A. states aged 15-54; moderate level of attendance is associated with fewer symptoms of distress.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Practice; Mental health
  • Clergy as mental health service providers to older adults.
    Pickard, Joseph G., and Baorong Guo (2008)
    Aging and Menal Health 12:5: 615-624.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy role; Gerontology; Mental health; Social services; Social support
  • Medicine, Religion, and Health. Where Science and Spirituality Meet.
    Koenig, Harold G. (2008)
    West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania: Templeton Foundation Press.

    Detailed review of the literature on the effect of religiosity on aspects of health.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Coping; Mental health; Suicide; Well-being, psychological; Social support; Health; Anxiety; Depression; Definition of religion; Disability; Stress
  • The Education-Contingent Association between Religiosity and Health: The Differential Effects of Self-Esteem and the Sense of Mastery.
    Schieman, Scott (2008)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 47:4: 710-724.

    Analyzes 1990-91 interview data from Toronto residents aged 18-55 who were fluent in English; the association between religiosity & mental health is enhanced by education & self-esteem but lessened by a sense of mastery.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Mental health; Depression; Canada, Ontario, Toronto; Alcohol; Religiosity
  • Aging in the Church. How Social Relationships Affect Health.
    Krause, Neal (2008)
    West Conshohocken, Pennsylvania: Temple Foundation Press.

    Review of the literature.

    Associated Search Terms: Parish; Prayer; Social support; Stress; Meaning; Coping; Health; Gerontology; Mental health
  • Faith, Morality and Mortality: The Ecological Impact of Religion on Population Health.
    Blanchard, Troy C., John P. Bartkowski, Todd L. Matthews, and Kent R. Kerley (2008)
    Social Forces 86:4: 1591-1620.

    Uses 2000 census county-level data, 2000 Glenmary membership data, & 1998-2002 U.S. mortality data. Number of conservative Protstant congregations predicts higher mortality, presumably because of otherworldliness & neglect of health infrastructure.

    Associated Search Terms: Individualism; Medical; Mortality; Conservative, U.S.A.; Ecology; Otherworldliness; United States
  • Cross-national variations in the correlation between frequency of prayer and health among older Europeans.
    Hank, Karsten, and Barbara Schaan (2008)
    Research on Aging 30:1: 36-54.

    Associated Search Terms: Europe; Gerontology; Health; Prayer
  • Congregational Support Networks, Health Beliefs, and Annual Medical Exams: Findings from a Nationwide Sample of Presbyterians.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Jinwoo Lee, Maureen R. Benjamins, Neal M. Krause, Daniell Nicole Ryan, and John P. Marcum (2008)
    Review of Religious Research 50:2: 176-193.

    Uses a 2007 Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A. survey to test hypotheses about taking steps in preventive medicine. Church medical activities & social networks are important, beliefs not.

    Associated Search Terms: Network; Medical; Health; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.
  • What do chaplains really do? II. Interventions in the New York Chaplaincy Study.
    Handzo, George F., Kevin J. Flannelly, Taryn Kudler, Sarah L. Fogg, Stephen R. Harding, Yusuf H. Hasan, A. Meigs Ross, and Bonita E. Taylor (2008)
    Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 14:1: 39-56.

    Associated Search Terms: Chaplain; Medical
  • What do chaplains really do? II. Visitation in the New York City Chaplaincy Study.
    Handzo, George F., Kevin J. Flannelly, Kathryn M. Murphy, John P. Bauman, Margaret Oettinger, Elaine Goodell, Yusuf H. Hasan, David P. Barrie, and Martha R. Jacobs (2008)
    Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 14:1: 20-38.

    Associated Search Terms: Chaplain; Medical
  • Selected findings from the "New York" and the "Metropolitan" chaplaincy studies: A 10-year comparison of chaplaincy in the New York City area.
    Vanderwerker, Lauren C., George F. Handzo, Sarah L. Fogg, and Jon A. Overvold (2008)
    Journal of Health Care Chaplaincy 15:1: 13-24.

    Associated Search Terms: Chaplain; Medical
  • Praying and coping: The relation between varieties of praying and religious coping styles.
    Bänziger, Sarah, Marinus van Uden, and Jacques Janssen (2008)
    Mental Health, Religion, and Culture 11:1: 101-118.

    Associated Search Terms: Coping; Prayer
  • Meaning, God, and prayer; Physical and metaphysical aspects of social support.
    Ladd, Kevin L., and Daniel N. McIntosh (2008)
    Mental health, Religion, and Culture 11: 23-38.

    Associated Search Terms: Meaning; Prayer; Social support
  • Religious and spiritual responses to 9/11: Evidence from the Add Health study.
    Uecker, Jeremy E. (2008)
    Sociological Spectrum 28: 477-509.

    Associated Search Terms: Disaster; Adolescents
  • Interculturality, Conflicts and Religion: Theoretical Perspectives.
    Parker Gumucio, Cristián (2008)
    Social Compass 55:3: 316-329.

    Interreligious conflicts today are almost always aspects of cultural conflicts deriving from international power relations or from migrations, education, health, & ethnicity.

    Associated Search Terms: Culture; Conflict
  • Religious Involvement and Educational Outcomes: The Role of Social Capital and Extracurricular Participation.
    Glanville, Jennifer L., David Sikkink, and Edwin I. Hernandez (2008)
    Sociological Quarterly 49:1: 105-137.

    Analyzes National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (U.S.A.) data; social capital & extracurricular participation mediate only a small part of the educationally positive effect of religious participation.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Practice; Education; Social capital
  • Talking About the 'Epidemic of the Millennium': Religion, Informal Communication, and HIV/AIDS in Sub-Saharan Africa.
    Agadjanian, Victor, and Cecilia Menjívar (2008)
    Social Problems 55: 301-321.

    Associated Search Terms: AIDS; Health
  • Beliefs about life-after-death, psychiatric symptomology, and cognitive theories of psychopathology.
    Flannelly, KevinJ., Christopher G. Ellison, Kathleen Galek, and Harold G. Koenig (2008)
    Journal of Psychology and Theolgy 36:2: 94-103.

    Associated Search Terms: Afterlife; Mental health
  • Prayer, God Imagery, and Symptoms of Psychopathology.
    Bradshaw, Matt, Christopher G. Ellison, and Kevin J. Flannelly (2008)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 47:4: 644-659.

    Analyzes 2004 online survey data from Americans; an image of and prayer to a remote & unloving God correlates with psychopathology symptoms; the reverse was true with an image of & prayer to a close & loving God.

    Associated Search Terms: Prayer; Mental health; God, image of
  • Spirituality and the health of college students.
    Nelms, Linda Wyatt , Edwin Hutchins, Dorothy Hutchins and Robert J. Pursley (2007)
    Journal of Religion and Health 46:2: 249-265.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Students, undergraduate; Spirituality
  • Religious Interests in Community Collaboration. The Quiet Fight for Health Care in South Omaha.
    Crawford, Sue E.S. (2007)
    In Paul A. Djupe and Laura R. Olson (eds.) Religious Interests in Community Conflict. Beyond the Culture Wars, Waco, Texas: Baylor University Press, pp. 103-122.

    Examines clergy establishing a health ministry in south Omaha.

    Associated Search Terms: Activism; Health; Medical; United States, Nebraska, Omaha
  • Altruism, Religion, and Health: Exploring the Ways in Which Helping others Benefits Support Providers.
    Krause, Neal (2007)
    In Stephen G. Post (ed.) Altruism and Health: Perspectives from Empirical Research. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 410-421.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Altruism
  • Prayer and health: Review, meta-analysis, and research agenda.
    Masters, Kevin S., and Glen I. Spielmans (2007)
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 30:4: 329-338.

    Associated Search Terms: Prayer; Health
  • Health behavior and religiosity among Israeli Jews.
    Shmueli, Amir, and Dov Tamir (2007)
    Israel Medical Association Journal 9:10: 703-707.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Israel; Religiosity; Jewish, Israel
  • Religious Doubt and Mental Health Across the Life Span.
    Galek, Kathleen, Neal Krause, Christopher G. Ellison, Taryn Kudler, and Kevin J. Flannelly (2007)
    Journal of Adult Development 14:1: 16-25.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Doubt; Life cycle
  • Challenges to Sanctuary: The Clergy as a Resource for Mental Health Care in the Community.
    Leavey, Gerard, Kate Loewenthal, and Michael King (2007)
    Social Science & Medicine 65:3: 548-559.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Medical; Mental health
  • Beliefs, mental health, and evolutionary threat assessment system sin the brain.
    Flannelly, Kevin J., Harold G. Koenig, Kathleen Galek, and Christopher G. Ellison (2007)
    Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 195:12: 996-1003.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Evolution; Belief
  • Predictors of Preventive Health Care Use among Middle-aged and Older Adults in Mexico: The Role of Religion.
    Benjamins, Maureen R. (2007)
    Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology 22:2: 221-234.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Mexico; Gerontology
  • Religion as Moderator of the Sense of Control-Health Connection: Gender Differences.
    Wink, Paul, Michelle Dillon, and Adrienne Prettyman (2007)
    Journal of Religion, Spirituality, and Aging 19: 21-41.

    Associated Search Terms: Control, sense of; Gender; Gerontology; Health
  • Is religiosity a protective factor against substance use in young adulthood? Only if you're straight!
    Rostosky, Sharon Scales, Fred Danner, and Ellen D.B. Riggle (2007)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 40:: 440-447.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug; Tobacco; Young adults; Homosexuality; Alcohol
  • Promises and challenges of faith-based AIDS care and support in Mozambique.
    Agadjanian, Victor, and Soma Sen (2007)
    American Journal of Public Health 95: 362-367.

    Associated Search Terms: Mozambique; AIDS
  • The relationship between attitude toward prayer and professional burnout among Anglican parochial clergy England: Are praying cledrgy healthier clergy?
    Turton, Douglas W., and Leslie J. Francis (2007)
    Mental Health, Religion & Culture 10:1: 61-74.

    Associated Search Terms: Burnout; Clergy; Church of England; Prayer; Great Britain
  • Forbidden Fruit. Sex & Religion in the Lives of American Teenagers.
    Regnerus, Mark D. (2007)
    New York: Oxford University Press.

    Based on 2002-03 National Survey of Youth and Religion data, with follow-up interviews, & the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health survey data.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Sexual attitudes; Sexual activity; Birth control; Moral
  • Religion and Remission of Depression in Medical Inpatients with Heart Failure/Pulmonary Disease.
    Koenig, Harold G. (2007)
    Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 195:5: 389-395.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Health
  • What has faith got to do with it? Religion and chld survival in Ghana.
    Gyimah, Stephen Obeng (2007)
    Journal of Biosocial Science 39: 923-937.

    Associated Search Terms: Ghana; Health
  • Religion/Spirituality and Adolescent Health Outcomes: A Review.
    Cotton, Sian, Kathy Zebracki, Susan L. Rosenthal, Joel Tsevat, and Dennis Drotar (2006)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 38:4: 472-480.

    Associated Search Terms: Spirituality; Health; Adolescents
  • The Clergy as a Source of Mental Health Assistance: What Americans Believe.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Margaret L. Vaaler, Kevin J. Flannelly, and Andrew J. Weaver (2006)
    Review of Religious Research 48:2: 190-211.

    Analyzes 1996 General Social Survey (U.S.A..) data; regular church attenders, biblical literalists, & older people see clergy as advisors in mental health matters.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Gerontology; Clergy role; Literalism; Mental health; United States
  • Religion and health in late life.
    Krause, Neal (2006)
    In James E. Birren and K. Warner Schaie (eds.) Handbook of the Psychology of Aging, 6th Ed. San Diego, California: Academic press, pp. 499-518.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Health
  • Making Sense of Suffering and Death: How Health Care Providers Construct Meanings in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.
    Cadge, Wendy, and E.A. Catlin (2006)
    Journal of Religion and Health 45: 248-263.

    Associated Search Terms: Death; Medical; Theodicy
  • Religiousness and mental health: A review.
    Moreia-Almeida, Alexander, Francisco Lotufo Neto, and Harold G. Koenig (2006)
    Revista Brasileira de Psiquiatria 28:3: 242-250.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Religiosity
  • Church-based Social Support and the Change in Health Over Time.
    Krause, Neal (2006)
    Review of Religious Research 48:2: 125-140.

    Analyzes U.S. Medicare beneficiary panel survey data, 2001-04; anticipated church social support predicts good health.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Locus of control; Social support; Medical
  • Religious Involvement and Health Outcomes among Older Persons in Taiwan.
    Yeager, Diane M., Dana A. Glei, Melanie Au, Hui-Shen Lin, Richard P. Sloan, and Maxine Weinstein (2006)
    Social Science and Medicine 63: 2228-2241.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Health; Taiwan
  • Challenges to the reproductive health needs of African women: On religion and maternal health utilization in Ghana.
    Gyimah, Stephen Obeng, Baffour K. Takyi, and Isaac Addai (2006)
    Social Science & Medicine 62: 2930-2944.

    Associated Search Terms: Women; Ghana; Health
  • Religious Attendance, Health Maintenance Beliefs, and Mammography Utilization: Findings from a Nationwide Survey of Presbyterian Women.
    Benjamins, Maureen R., Jenny Trinitapoli, and Christopher G. Ellison (2006)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 45:4: 597-607.

    Analyzes 1991 panel data from Presbyterian women in the U.S.A.; attendance predicts mammogram use, as does the belief that spiritual & physical health are related.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Presbyterian Church in the U.S.; Medical
  • Religious influences on preventive health care in a nationally representative sample of middle-age women.
    Benjamins, Maureen R. (2006)
    Journal of Behavioral Medicine 29:1: 1-16.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Women
  • Religious Attendance and the Health Behaviors of Texas Adults.
    Hill, Terrence D., Amy M. Burdette, Christopher G. Ellison, and Marc A. Musick (2006)
    Preventive Medicine 42: 309-312.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Texas; Practice; Health
  • Belief in life after death and mental health: Findings from a national survey.
    Flannelly, Kevin J., Harold G. Koenig, Christopher G. Ellison, Neal M. Krause, and Kathleen C. Galek (2006)
    Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 194:7: 524-529.

    Associated Search Terms: Afterlife; Mental health; United States
  • Does Religion Buffer the Effects of Discrimination on Mental Health? Differing Effects by Race.
    Bierman, Alex (2006)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 45:4: 551-565.

    Based on 1995 U.S. survey data from adults in the 48 contiguous states; religious attendance moderates distress, seemingly related to discrimination, among African Americans.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Mental health; Discrimination; Practice; Distress
  • Gender differences in religious practices, spiritual experiences and health: Results from the U.S. General Social Survey.
    Maselko, Joanna, and Laura D. Kubzansky (2006)
    Social Science and Medicine 62:11: 2848-2860.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Gender; Experience; Practice; Sex; United States
  • Frequency of attendance at religious services, overweight, and obesity in American women and men: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
    Gillum, Richard Frank (2006)
    Annals of Epidemiology 16:9: 655-660.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Epidemiology; Health; United States
  • The Role of Parent Religiosity in Teens' Transitions to Sex and Contraception.
    Manlove, Jennifer S., Elizabeth Terry-Humen, Erum N. Ikramullah, and Kristen A. Moore (2006)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 39: 578-587.

    Associated Search Terms: Family; Sexual activity; Adolescents
  • Suicidal ideation among young people in the UK: Churchgoing as an inhibitory influence?
    Kay, William K., and Leslie J. Francis (2006)
    Mental Health, Religion and Culture 9: 127-140.

    Associated Search Terms: Suicide; Practice; Great Britain; Adolescents
  • From biopolitics to bioethics: chuch, state, medcine and asisted reproductive technology in Ireland.
    McDonnell, Orla, and Jill Allison (2006)
    Sociology of Health & Illness 28:6:817-837.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, Ireland; Ireland; Moral; Politics, Ireland; Reproductive technologies
  • Religion and Happiness: Consensus, Contradictions, Comments and Concerns.
    Lewis, Christopher A., and Sharon M. Cruise (2006)
    Mental Health, Religion & Culture 9:3: 213-225.

    Associated Search Terms: Well-being
  • Gratitude Toward God, Stress, and Health in Late Life.
    Krause, Neal (2006)
    Research on Aging 28: 163-183.

    Associated Search Terms: Gratitude; Stress; Gerontology
  • State Institutions as Mediators between Religion and Fertility: A Comparison of two Swiss Regions, 1860-1930.
    Praz, Anne-Françoise (2006)
    In Renzo Derosas and Frans van Poppel (eds.) Religion and the Decline of Fertility in the Western World. Dordrecht: Springer, pp. 147-176.

    Governmental health, educational, & communications policies are responsible for religious correlates of fertility rates.

    Associated Search Terms: Switzerland, Vaud Canton; Catholic, Switzerland; Demography; Protestant, Switzerland; Switzerland, Fribourg Canton; Fertility
  • Do as I Say and as I Do: The Effects of Consistent Parental Beliefs and Behaviors upon Religious Transmission.
    Bader, Christopher D., and Scott A. Desmond (2006)
    Sociology of Religion 67:3: 313-329.

    Analyzes National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (U.S.A.) data; parents who are religious in attitude & practice transmit their religiosity to their children.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Socialization; Family
  • Exploring the Stress-buffering Effects of Church-based Social Support and Secular Social Support on Health in Late Life.
    Krause, Neal (2006)
    Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences 61 B: S35-S43.

    Associated Search Terms: Social support; Gerontology
  • An Increase in Religiousness/Spirituality Occurs after HIV Diagnosis and Predicts Slower Disease Progression Over 4 Years in People with HIV.
    Ironson, G., R. Stuetzie, and M.A. Fletcher (2006)
    Journal of General Internal Medicine 21: S62-S68.

    Associated Search Terms: AIDS; Health
  • Examining the links between spiritual struggles and symptoms of psychopathology in a national sample.
    McConnell, Kelly M., Kenneth I. Pargament, Christopher G. Ellison, and Kevin J. Flannelly (2006)
    Journal of Clinical Psychology 62: 1469-1484.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health
  • Gender, Religious Involvement, and HIV/AIDS Prevention in Mozambique.
    Agadjanian, Victor (2006)
    Social Science & Medicine 61: 1529-1539.

    Associated Search Terms: Mozambique; Health; AIDS
  • Risk and Protective Factors for Meningococal Disease in Adolescents: Matched Cohort Study.
    Tully, J., R.M. Viner, P.G. Coen, et al. (2006)
    British Medical Journal 332:7539: 445-450.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Adolescents; Risk preference
  • The Christian Reformed Church as a Model for the Inclusion of People with Disabilities.
    Pridmore, Eric (2006)
    In Albert A. Herzog, Jr. (ed.) Disability Advocacy among Religious Organizations. Histories and Reflections. Binghamton, New York: Haworth Pastoral Press, pp. 93-107. [Journal of Religion, Disabilities & Health 10:1/2]

    Case study of a congregation in Atlanta.

    Associated Search Terms: Christian Reformed Church; Disability; United States, Georgia; United States, Georgia, Atlanta
  • The Sense of Divine Control and Psychological Distress: Variations Across Race and Socioeconomic Status.
    Schieman, Scott, Tetyana Pudrovska, Leonard I. Pearlin, and Christopher G. Ellison (2006)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 45:4: 529-549.

    Based on 2001-02 interview data from senior citizens in & near Washington, D.C.; sense of divine control correlates inversely with distress among African Americans & positively with it among whites.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, District of Columbia, Washington; Gerontology; Stratification; Distress; African Americans; Mental health; Control, divine; Race
  • Observing Religion and Health.
    Finke, Roger (2005)
    In K. W. Schaie, N. Krause, and A. Booth (eds.), Religious Influences on Health and Well-Being in the Elderly. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

    Associated Search Terms: Health
  • Religion and Bio-Psycho-Social Health: A Review and Conceptual Model.
    Marks, Loren D. (2005)
    Journal of Religion and Health 44: 173-186.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Medical; Health
  • Religion, Stress, and Mental Health in Adolescence: Findings from ADD Health.
    Nooney, Jennifer G. (2005)
    Review of Religious Research 46:4: 341-354.

    Analyzes 1994-95 National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health data (U.S.A.). Religious involvement helps prevent school & health stressors, which reduces depression. It also mobilizes social resources relevant to suicide.

    Associated Search Terms: Suicide; Depression; Health; Adolescents
  • How are Religious Belief and Behavior Good for You? An Investigation of Mediators Relating Religion to Mental Health in a Sample of Israeli Jewish Students.
    Vilchinsky, Noa, and Shlomo Kravetz (2005)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 44:4: 459-471.

    Among religious & secular students in Israel, but not those self-identified on family or national grounds, religious practice predicts mental health.

    Associated Search Terms: Israel; Students, undergraduate; Mental health; Meaning
  • Religion as moderator of the depression-health connection.
    Wink, Paul, Michelle Dillon, and Britta Larsen (2005)
    Research on Aging 27:2: 197-220.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Health
  • Religion and Health among African Americans: A Qualitative Examination.
    Marks, Loren D., Olena Nesteruk, Mandy Swanson, M.E. Betsy Garrison, and Tanya Davis (2005)
    Research on Aging 27: 447-474.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Gerontology; African Americans
  • Religion, health and medicine in African Americans; Implications for physicians.
    Levin, Jeffrey S., Linda M. Chatters, and Robert J. Taylor (2005)
    Journal of the National Medical Association 97:2: 237-249.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Health; African Americans
  • Religiosity and the Validity of Self-reported Smoking: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
    Gillum, Richard Frank (2005)
    Review of Religious Research 47(2):190-196.

    Analyzes 1988-94 National (U.S.A..) Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data; religiosity did not correlate with under-reporting of smoking, the latter detected independently of reporting.

    Associated Search Terms: Smoking
  • Bricolage vaut-il dissémination? Quelques réflexions sur l'opérationnalité sociologique d'une métaphor problématique.
    Hervieu-Léger, Danièle (2005)
    Social Compass 52:3: 295-308.

    Proposes the existence of national constraints on bricolage or tinkering; explores the cases of religion in health, science, & beliefs about the afterlife.

    Associated Search Terms: Science; Syncretism; Afterlife; Health
  • Religious Differentials in the Sexual and Reproductive Behaviors of Young Women in the United States.
    Jones, Rachael K., Jacqueline E. Darroch, and Susheela Singh (2005)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 36: 279-288.

    Associated Search Terms: Sexual activity; Women; United States
  • After the promise: The STD consequences of adolescent virginity pledges.
    Brückner, Hannah, and Peter Bearman (2005)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 36:4: 271-278.

    Associated Search Terms: Sexual activity; Adolescents
  • Righteous Riches. The Word of Faith Movement in Contemporary African American Religion.
    Harrison, Milmon F. (2005)
    New York: Oxford University Press.

    Participant observation study of a non-denominational "health and wealth" movement in African American religion.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Prosperity Gospel, U.S.A.; Social movement; Participant observation; Word of Faith, U.S.A.
  • A national survey of health care administrators' views about the importance of various chaplain roles.
    Flannelly, Kevin J., George Handzo, Kathleen Galek, Andrew Weaver, and Walter J. Smith (2005)
    Journal of Pastoral Care and Counseling 59:1-2: 87-96.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Hospital chaplain
  • How are religion and spirituality related to health? A study of physicians' perspectives.
    Curlin, Farr A., Chad J. Roach, R. Gorawara-Bhat, John D. Lantos, and Marhsall H. Chin (2005)
    Southern Medical Journal 98: 761-766.

    Associated Search Terms: Physician
  • Church-based Social Ties, a Sense of Belonging in a Congregation and Physical Health Status.
    Krause, Neal, and Keith M. Wulff (2005)
    International Journal of the Psychology of Religion 15:1: 73-93.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Social support
  • Falun Dafa and the New Age Movement in Malaysia: Signs of Health, Symbols of Salvation.
    Ackerman, Susan E. (2005)
    Social Compass 52:4: 495-511.

    Associated Search Terms: Malaysia; New age; Syncretism; Falun Dafa, Malaysia
  • Selection Effects in Studies of Religious Influence.
    Regnerus, Mark D., and Christian Smith (2005)
    Review of Religious Research 47:1: 23-50.

    Analyzes 1990s panel data from U.S. students in grades 7-12; shows religious practice & salience are independent variables affecting health, family, & delinquency, despite background controls.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Salience; Family; Delinquency; Students, primary; Students, secondary; Medical
  • Frequency of Attendance at Religious Services and Cigarette Smoking in American Women and Men: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.
    Gillum, Richard Frank (2005)
    Preventive Medicine 41: 607-613.

    Smoking is inversely related to attendance at religious services.

    Associated Search Terms: Tobacco; Practice; United States
  • Subjective Religiosity and Depression in the Transition to Adulthood.
    Eliassen, A. Henry, John Taylor, and Donald A. Lloyd (2005)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 44:2: 187-199.

    Established patterns of religiosity mitigate depression, but stressors elicit increased prayer activity.

    Associated Search Terms: Prayer; Religiosity; Adolescents; Mental health; Depression; Stress
  • The Delivery of Health Care in Faith-Based Organizations: Parish Nurses as Promoters of Health.
    Anderson, Carolyn M. (2004)
    Health Communication 16:1: 117-128.

    Associated Search Terms: Nurse; Health
  • Religious Doubt and Health: Exploring the Potential Dark Side of Religion.
    Krause, Neal, and Keith M. Wulff (2004)
    Sociology of Religion 65:1: 35-56.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from 434 U.S. Christian religious congregations. Religious doubt predicts less satisfaction with health & more depression, especially among congregation members who fill official church offices.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; United States; Faith; Mental health; Doubt
  • Religion and Health: A European Perspective.
    Lalive d'Epinay, Christian J., and Dario Spini (2004)
    In K. Warner Schaie, Neal Krause, and Alan Booth (eds.) Religious Influences on Health and Well-being in the Elderly. New York: Springer, pp. 44-58.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Gerontology; Well-being
  • Trauma, Change in Strength of Religious Faith, and Mental Health Service Use among Veterans Treated for PTSD.
    Fontana, A., and R. Rosenheck (2004)
    Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease 192: 579-584.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health
  • Is Going to Church Good or Bad for You? Denomination, Attendance, and Mental Health of Children in West Scotland.
    Abbotts, Joanne E., Rory G.A. Williams, Helen N. Sweeting, and Patrick B. West (2004)
    Social Science and Medicine 58: 645-656.

    Associated Search Terms: Children; Practice; Mental health; Denomination (organizational entity); Great Britain, Scotland
  • Religious Participation, Interleukin-6, and Mortality in Older Adults.
    Lutgendorf, S.K., D. Russell, P. Ulrich, T.B. Harris, and R. Wallace. (2004)
    Health Psychology 23:5: 465-475.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Practice; Mortality
  • Understanding Stress and Quality of Life for Clergy and Clergy Spouses.
    Darling, Carol A., E. Wayne Hill, and Lenore M. McWey (2004)
    Stress and Health 20: 261-277.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy spouses; Clergy; Stress
  • Catholic Attitudes on Sexual Behavior & Reproductive Health.
    Catholics for a Free Choice (2004)
    Washington: Catholics for a Free Choice.

    Reports international data.

    Associated Search Terms: Birth control; Politics; Divorce; Sexual activity; Catholic; Cohabitation; Condoms; Abortion
  • Attendance at Religious Services and Mortality in a National Sample.
    Musick, Marc A., James S. House, and David R. Williams (2004)
    Journal of Health & Social Behavior 45:2: 198-213.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; United States; Practice
  • Individually Together. Volunteering in Late Modernity: Social Work in the Finnish Church.
    Yeung, Anne Birgitta (2004)
    Helsinki: Finnish federation for Social Welfare and Health.

    Associated Search Terms: Lutheran, Finland; Volunteering; Finland
  • A Statistical Profile of Mormons: Health, Wealth and Social Life.
    Heaton, Tim B., Stephen J. Bahr, and Cardell K. Jacobson (2004)
    Lewiston, New York: Edwin Mellen Press.

    Associated Search Terms: Mormon
  • Religion in the Lives of African Americans: Social, Psychological, and Health Perspectives.
    Taylor, Robert Joseph, Linda M. Chatters, and Jeffrey Levin (2004)
    Thousand Oaks, California: Sage.

    Synthesis of previous studies, using focus group quotations as illustrations.

    Associated Search Terms: Generations; Social support; Prayer; Practice; Clergy role; Well-being; African Americans; Medical; Denomination (organizational entity)
  • Religious Orientation, Aging, and Blood Pressure Reactivity to Interpersonal and Cognitive Stressors.
    Masters, Kevin S., R.D. Hill, J.C. Kircher, T.L. Benson, and J.A. Fallon (2004)
    Annals of Behavioral Medicine 28:3: 171-178.

    Associated Search Terms: Stress; Health; Gerontology
  • Yearning for God: Trance as a culturally specific pratice and its implications for understanding dissociative disorders.
    Luhrmann, Tanya M. (2004)
    Journal of Trauma and Dissociation 5: 101-129.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Trance
  • Religion and spirituality: Linkages to physcal health.
    Powell, Lynda H., Leila Shahabi, and Carl E. Thoresen (2003)
    American Psychologist 58:1: 36-52.

    Associated Search Terms: Spirituality; Health
  • Spirituality, breast cancer beliefs, and mammography utlization among urban African American women.
    Holt, Cheryl L., Susan N. Lukwago, and Matthew W. Kreuter (2003)
    Journal of Health Psychology 8:3: 383-396.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Health
  • Praying for Others, Financial Strain, and Physical Health Status in Late Life.
    Krause, Neal (2003)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 42:3: 377-391.

    Analyzes 2001 interview data from older Americans. Older African Americans pray for others more than do whites. The practice correlates with self-rated health. Praying for material goods has no such effect.

    Associated Search Terms: Prayer; Stress; Gerontology; Medical; African Americans
  • Religion, Religiosity and Spirituality in the Biopsychosocial Model of Health and Aging.
    Cohen, Adam B., and Harold G. Koenig (2003)
    Ageing International 28:3: 215-241.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Health; Religiosity
  • Religion and women's health in Ghana: Insights into HIV/AIDS preventive and protective behavior.
    Takyi, Baffour K. (2003)
    Social Science and Medicine 56: 1221-1234.

    Associated Search Terms: AIDS; Ghana; Health; Women
  • Religiosity and Risky Sexual Behavior in African American Adolescent Females.
    McCree, Donna Hubbard, Gina M. Winggood, Ralph DiClemente, Susan Davies, and Katherine F. Harrington (2003)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 33: 2-8.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Women; Sexual activity; African Americans; Adolescents
  • Race, religion, and abstinence from alcohol in late life.
    Krause, Neal (2003)
    Journal of Aging and Health 15:3: 508-533.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Race; Alcohol
  • Religious doubt, helping others, and psychological well-being.
    Krause, Neal (2003)
    Journal of Religion and Health 54:2: 745-758.

    Associated Search Terms: Altruism; Well-being, psychological; Doubt
  • Religion and Preventive Health Care Utilization among the Elderly
    Benjamins, Maureen R., and Carolyn Brown (2003)
    Social Science and Medicine 58:1: 109-118.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Medical
  • Religion and Health. Depressive Symptoms and Mortality as Case Studies.
    McCullough, Michael E., and Timothy B. Smith (2003)
    In Michele Dillon (ed.) Handbook of the Sociology of Religion. New York: Cambridge University Press, pp. 190-204.

    Review of the literature.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Depression; Mortality; Death
  • Coital debut: The role of religiosity and sex attitudes in the Add Health Survey.
    Rostosky, Sharon Scales, Mark D. Regnerus, and Margaret Laurie Comer Wright (2003)
    Journal of Sex Research 40:4: 358-367.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Religiosity; Sexual activity
  • Measuring Multiple Dimensions of Religion and Spirituality for Health Research: Conceptual Background and Findings from the 1998 General Social Survey.
    Idler, Ellen L., Marc A. Musick, Christopher G. Ellison, Linda K. George, Neal Krause, Jeffrey S. Levin, Marcia G. Ory, Kenneth I. Pargament, Lynda H. Powell, Lynn G. Underwood, and David R. Williams (2003)
    Research on Aging 25: 327-365.

    Associated Search Terms: Spirituality; Dimensions of religiosity
  • Age-related Declines in Activity Level: The Relationship between Chronic Illness and Religious Activities.
    Benjamins, Maureen R., Marc A. Musick, Deborah T. Gold, and Linda K. George (2003)
    Journals of Gerontology Series B--Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences 58:6: S377-S385.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Gerontology; Age
  • Religiousness, spirituality, and psychosocial functioning in late adulthood: Findings from a longitudinal study.
    Wink, Paul, and Michelle Dillon (2003)
    Psychology and Aging 18:4: 916-924.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Mental health; Longitudinal; Gerontology; Spirituality
  • Relationship between church attendance and mental health among Mormons and non-Mormons in Utah.
    Merrill, Ray M., and Richard D. Salazar (2002)
    Mental health, Religion and Culture 5: 17-33.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Utah; Practice; Mental health; Mormon, U.S.A.
  • The Effects of Church-Based Emotional Support on Health: Do They Vary by Gender?
    Krause, Neal, Christopher G. Ellison, and Jack P. Marcum (2002)
    Sociology of Religion 63:1: 21-47.

    Analyzes 1996-99 panel survey data from U.S. Presbyterian clergy, elders, & members. Women received more social support from the church; church based social support correlated with self-reported health among men.

    Associated Search Terms: Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.; Health; Gender; Medical
  • Claims about Religious Involvement and Health Outcomes.
    Sloan, Richard P., and Emilia Bagiella (2002)
    Annals of Behavioral Medicine 24:1: 14-21.

    Associated Search Terms: Health
  • Explaining the Relationship Between Religious Involvement and Health.
    George, Linda K., Christopher G. Ellison, and David B. Larson (2002)
    Psychological Inquiry 13:3: 190-200.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Practice
  • A Review of Mortality Research on Clergy and Other Religious Professionals.
    Flannelly, Kevin J., Andrew J. Weaver, David B. Larson, and Harold G. Koenig (2002)
    Journal of Religion and Health 41:1: 57-68.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Health; Mortality
  • Public and Private Domains of Religiosity and Adolescent Health Risk Behaviors: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.
    Nonnemaker, James M., Clea A. McNeely, and Robert William Blum (2002)
    Social Science and Medicine 57: 2049-2054.

    Associated Search Terms: Longitudinal; Health; Adolescents; Religiosity
  • Systematic Review of Clinical Trials Examining the Effects of Religion on Health.
    Townsend, Mark, Virginia Kladder, Hana Ayele, and Thomas Mulligan (2002)
    Southern Medical Journal 95:12: 1429-1434.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Medical
  • Spirituality and Religiousness are Associated with Long Survival, Health Behaviors, Less Distress, and Lower Cortisol in People Living with HIV/AIDS: The IWORSHIP Scale, Its Validity and Reliability.
    Ironson, G., G.F. Solomon, E.G. Balbin, et al. (2002)

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; AIDS; Health
  • Religious Coping and Church-based Social Support as Predictors of Mental Health Outcomes: Testing a Conceptual Model.
    Nooney, Jennifer G., and Eric Woodrum (2002)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 41:2: 359-368.

    Analyzes 1998 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data; attendance moderated depression through church-based social support & religious coping while prayer did so through religious coping. Fundamentalism positively predicted depression.

    Associated Search Terms: Coping; Depression; Prayer; United States; Social support; Mental health
  • Religiousness and Sexual Responsibility in Adolescent Girls.
    Miller, Lisa, and Merav Gur (2002)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 31: 401-406.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Women; Religiosity; Sexual activity
  • The importance of religiosity and values in predicting political attitudes: Evidence for the continuing importance of religiosity in Flanders (Belgium).
    Duriez, Bart, Patrick Luyten, Boris Snauwaert, and Dirk Hutsebaut (2002)
    Mental Health, Religion and Culture 5:1: 35-54.

    Associated Search Terms: Belgium, Flanders; Politics, Belgium; Religiosity; Values
  • Church-based Social Support and Health in Old Age: Exploring Variations by Race.
    Krause, Neal (2002)
    Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences 57B:6: S355-S347.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Race; Gerontology
  • God, Faith, and Health: Exploring the Spirituality-Healing Connection.
    Levin, Jeffrey S. (2001)
    Hoboken, New Jersey: Wiley & Sons.

    Associated Search Terms: Health
  • Advances in the Measurement of Religion among Older African Americans: Implications for Health and Mental Health Researchers.
    Chatters, Linda M., Robert J. Taylor, and Karen D. Lincoln (2001)
    Journal of Mental Health and Aging 7:1: 181-200.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Measurement; Methods; African Americans
  • God, Love, and Health: Findings from a Clinical Study.
    Levin, Jeffrey S. (2001)
    Review of Religious Research 42:3: 277-293.

    Based on questionnaires distributed at a medical clinic to patients; having a loving relationship with God predicts better health.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; God, image of; United States, Virginia
  • Religious Seeking among Affiliates and Non-affiliates: Do Mental and Physical Health Problems Spur Religious Coping?
    Ferraro, Kenneth F., and Jessica A. Kelley-Moore (2001)
    Review of Religious Research 42:3: 229-251.

    Serious medical problems do not necessarily increase religious activity.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Medical; Practice; United States; Atheist; Coping
  • Religious attendance increases survival by improving and mantaining good health behaviors, mental health, and socal relationships.
    Strawbridge, William J., Sarah J. Shema, Richard D. Cohen, and George A. Kaplan (2001)
    Annals of Behavioral Medicine 23:1: 68-74.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Demography; Mortality
  • Religious preference, church activity, and physical exercise.
    Merrill, Ray M., and A.L. Thygerson (2001)
    Preventive Medicined 33: 38-45.

    Associated Search Terms: Health
  • God images and self-worth among adolescents in Scotland.
    Francis, Leslie J., Harry M. Gibson, and Mandy Robbins (2001)
    Mental Health, Religion & Culture 4:2: 103-108.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; God, image of; Great Britain, Scotland; Self-esteem
  • Sociological perspectives on the pastoral care of minority faith in hospital.
    Gilliat-Ray, Sophie (2001)
    In H. Orchard (ed.) Spirituality in Health Care Contexts. London: Jessica Kingsley.

    Associated Search Terms: Hospital; Minority
  • Religious Involvement, Stress, and Mental Health: Findings from the 1995 Detroit Area Study.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Jason D. Boardman, David R. Williams, and James S. Jackson (2001)
    Social Forces 80:1: 215-249.

    Telephone interview data from the 1995 Detroit Area Study: religious attendance predicts well-being positively & distress negatively; prayer weakly predicts well-being negatively & distress positively; afterlife belief predicts well-being positively.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Afterlife; Prayer; Belief; United States, Michigan, Detroit; Well-being; Distress
  • Religious Coping, Ethnicity, and Ambulatory Blood Pressure.
    Steffen, P.R., and A.L. Hinderliter (2001)
    Psychosomatic Medicine 63:4: 523-530.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Coping
  • When is Faith Enough? The Effects of Religious Involvement on Depression.
    Schnittker, Jason (2001)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 40:3: 393-411.

    Analyzes 1986 & '89 U.S. panel survey data; attendance had no independent effect on depression, religious help-seeking (prayer) had some inverse effect, & salience had a curvilinear effect, with moderate religiosity predicting less depression

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Salience; Prayer; Practice; Depression; Mental health
  • Religion, spirituality and health: Public health research and practice.
    Chatters, Linda M. (2000)
    Annual Review of Public Health 21:1: 335-367.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Spirituality
  • Spirituality and health: What we know, what we need to know.
    George, Linda K., David B. Larson, Harold G. Koenig, and Michael E. McCullough (2000)
    Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology 19:1: 102-116.

    Associated Search Terms: Spirituality; Health
  • Mental Health Services in Faith Communities: The Role of Clergy in Black Churches.
    Taylor, Robert Joseph, Christopher G. Ellison, Linda M. Chatters, Jeffrey S. Levin, and K.D. Lincoln (2000)

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Clergy; African Americans
  • Fatalism and the practice of health behaviors among African American Baptists.
    Cort, Malcolm, and Lionel Matthews (2000)
    National Journal of Sociology 12:1: 79-103.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Health; Baptist, U.S.A.; Fatalism
  • Religious involvement and mortality: A meta-analytic review.
    McCullough, Michael E., William T. Hoyt, David B. Larson, Harold G. Koenig, and Carl Thoresen (2000)
    Health Psychology 19:3: 211-222.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Demography; Religiosity
  • The relationship between Bible reading and purpose in life among 13-15 year olds.
    Francis, Leslie J. (2000)
    Mental Health, Religion and Culture 3: 27-36.

    Associated Search Terms: Meaning; Bible reading; Adolescents
  • Among the Hmong: Bridging the Gap between Shamanism and Medicine.
    Numrich, Paul David (2000)
    Health Care and the New Immigration 17: 1-19.

    Associated Search Terms: Shamanism; Medical; Hmong Americans
  • Religious Consolation among Men and Women: Do Health Problems Spur Seeking?
    Ferraro, Kenneth F., and Jessica A. Kelley-Moore (2000)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 39:2: 220-234.

    Analyzes panel data (1986 & '89) from American adults. Uses a measure of coping beyond religiosity measures.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Coping
  • Dramatizing the "health and wealth gospel": Belief and practice of a neo-Pentecostal "faith" ministry.
    Hunt, Stephen (2000)
    Journal of Beliefs and Values 21:1: 73-86.

    Associated Search Terms: Pentecostal, neo; Healing
  • "Winning ways": Globalisation and the impact of the health and wealth gospel.
    Hunt, Stephen (2000)
    Journal of Contemporary Religion 15:3: 331-347.

    Associated Search Terms: Prosperity Gospel; Globalization
  • Reexamining the Relationship between Religiosity and Life Satisfaction.
    Lam, Pui-Yan, and Thomas Rotolo (2000)
    Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion 11: 133-153.

    Analyzes 1993 General Social Survey (U.S.A..) data. Attendance predicts satisfaction with health & finances; denominations vary in predicting various aspects of satisfaction.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Well-being; Religiosity; United States; Life satisfaction; Denomination (organizational entity)
  • Does Private Religious Activity Prolong Survival? A Six-Year Follow-up Study of 3,851 Older Adults.
    Helm, H.M., J.C. Hays, E.P. Flint, Harold G. Koenig, and Daniel G. Blazer (2000)
    Journals of Gerontology Series A: 55: M400-M405.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Gerontology; Devotionalism; Health
  • Religiosity and obesity: Are overweight people more religious?
    Ellis, Lee, and David Biglione (2000)
    Personality and Individual Differences 28:6: 1119-1123.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Obesity; Religiosity
  • Religion, Social Support, and Health among the Japanese Elderly.
    Krause, Neal, Berit Ingersoll-Dayton, Jersey Liang, and Hidehiro Sugisawa (1999)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 40:4: 405-421.

    Analyzes 1996 interview data from Japanese seniors; for men religion promotes helping others, which in turn predicts reported health.

    Associated Search Terms: Japan; Medical; Gerontology; Altruism
  • The Religion and Health Connection: Evidence, Theory, and Future Directions.
    Ellison, Christopher G., and Jeffrey S. Levin (1999)
    Health Education and Behavior 25: 700-720.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical
  • Organized Religion and Seniors' Mental Health.
    Blasi, Anthony J. (1999)
    Lanham, Maryland: University Press of America.

    Based on survey data from Tennessee seniors & interview data from church ministers to the elderly in Nashville, Tennessee; makes comparisons by race.

    Associated Search Terms: Community study; Parish; Gerontology; United States, Tennessee, Nashville; Depression; Mental health; Clergy; African Americans
  • Multidimensional Measurement of Religiousness/Spirituality for Use in Health Research.
    Fetzer Institute/National Institute on Aging Work Group (1999)
    Kalamazoo, Michigan: Fetzer Institute.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity scale
  • Prison Chaplaincy.
    Beckford, James A., and Sophie Gilliat-Ray (1999)
    In S. Horner and M. Stacey (eds.) Incarceration Humane and Inhumane. Human Values and Health Care in British Prisons. London: Nuffield Trust, pp. 49-64.

    Associated Search Terms: Prison chaplain; Great Britain
  • Gender, Profession, and non-Conformal Religiosity.
    Warburg, Margit, Peter Lüchau, and Peter B. Andersen (1999)
    Journal of Contemporary Religion 14: 177-290.

    Not one's gender, but the prevalence of women in a profession explains the high rate of nonconformist religion in the social, educational, & health professions in Denmark. Uses European Values Study data for Denmark & interviews with Danish Baha'is.

    Associated Search Terms: Denmark; Baha´i, Denmark; Gender; Occupation; Deviance/social control
  • Religious Involvement and U.S. Adult Mortality.
    Hummer, Robert A., Richard G. Rogers, Charles B. Nam, and Christopher G. Ellison (1999)
    Demography 36: 273-285.

    Based on U.S.A.. data; religious attendance not only negatively predicts mortality because the ill cannot attend, but also because of its association with better health practices & with social ties.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Mortality; Demography; Practice
  • Does Public and Private Religiosity Have a Moderating Effect on Depression? A Bi-racial Study of Elders in the American South.
    Husaini, Baqar A., Anthony J. Blasi, and Oscar Miller (1999)
    International Journal of Aging and Development 48:1: 63-72.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Religiosity, collective; Religiosity, private; Gerontology; African Americans; United States, Tennessee, Nashville
  • Public Health and Health Education in Faith Communities.
    Chatters, Linda M., Jeffrey S. Levin, and Christopher G. Ellison (1998)
    Health Education & Behavior 25: 689-699.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Education
  • The Religion-health Connection: Evidence, Theory, and Future Directions.
    Ellison, Christopher G., and Jeffrey S. Levin (1998)
    Health Education and Behavior 25:6: 700-720.

    Associated Search Terms: Health
  • Religion's role in promoting health and reducing risk among American youth.
    Wallace, John M., Jr., and Tyrone A. Forman (1998)
    Health Education & Behavior 25:6: 721-741.

    Associated Search Terms: Risk preference; Youth; Health
  • The African American Minister as a Source of Help for Serious Personal Crises: Bridge or Barrier to Mental Health Care?
    Neighbors, Harold W., Marc A. Musick, and D.R. Williams (1998)
    Health Education and Behavior 25: 759-777.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Clergy; Mental health
  • Religion, health, and psychological well-being in older adults: Findings from three national surveys.
    Levin, Jeffrey S., and Linda M. Chatters (1998)
    Journal of Aging and Health 10:4: 504-531.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Well-being, psychological; Health
  • What sociology can help us understand about religion and mental health.
    Idler, Ellen L., and Linda K. George (1998)
    In Harold G. Koenig (ed.) Handbook of Religion, Mental Health. San Diego, California: Academic Press, pp. 51-62.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health
  • Neighborhood deterioration, religious coping, and changes in health during late life.
    Krause, Neal (1998)
    Gerontologist 38;6: 653-664.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Urban; Coping
  • Race and Ethnic Differences in the Effects of Religious Attendance on Subjective Health.
    Drevenstedt, Greg L. (1998)
    Review of Religious Research 39:3: 245-263.

    Analyzes 1972-93 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Medical; Practice; African Americans; Latino Americans; Health
  • Seniors' Mental Health and Pastoral Practices in African American Churches: An Exploratory Study in a Southern City.
    Blasi, Anthony J., Baqar A. Husaini, and Darrell A. Drumwright (1998)
    Review of Religious Research 40:2: 168-177.

    Based on 1997 interviews with ministers to older people in largely African American churches in Nashville.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Tennessee, Nashville; Mental health; Clergy; African Americans; Gerontology
  • Religion and mortality among the community-dwelling elderly.
    Oman, Douglas, and Dwayne Reed (1998)
    American Journal of Public Health 88:10: 1469-1475.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Demography; Mortality
  • Spiritual and Religious Factors in Substance Use, Dependence, and Recovery.
    Booth, J., and J.E. Martin (1998)
    In Harold G. Koenig (ed.) Handbook of Religion and Mental Health. San Diego: Academic Press, pp. 175-200.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug; Alcohol
  • De la thérapie à la spiritualité et inversement: l'exemple de la Scientologie et du rebirth.
    Dericquebourg, Régis (1998)
    Recherches sociologiques 29:2: 37-51.

    Associated Search Terms: Scientology; Mental health
  • Firm Believers? Religion, Body Weight, and Well-being.
    Ferraro, Kenneth F. (1998)
    Review of Religious Research 39:3: 224-244.

    Analyzes 1986 survey data from Americans aged 25+.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; United States; Happiness; Depression; Mental health; Health
  • Religious activity and depression among community-dwelling elderly persons with cancer: The moderating effect of race.
    Musick, Marc A., Harold G. Koenig, Judith C. Hays, and Harvey J. Cohen (1998)
    Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences 53B: S218-S227.

    Associated Search Terms: Race; Depression; Gerontology; Health; Medical
  • Panel Analyses of Religious Involvement and Well-being in African Americans: Contemporaneous vs. Longitudinal Effects.
    Levin, Jeffrey S., and Robert J. Taylor (1998)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 37:4: 695-709.

    Analyzes 1979-92 National Survey of African Americans data; church attendance, activity, prayer, etc. contribute to life satisfaction & happiness.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Prayer; Life satisfaction; African Americans; Mental health
  • Religion and Adolescent Health-compromising Behavior."
    Wallace, John M., Jr., and David R. Williams (1997)
    In J. Schulenberg, J. Maggs, and K. Hurrelmann (eds.) Health Risks and Developmental Transitions During Aolescence. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, pp. 444-468.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescence; Adolescents; Medical
  • The Subjective Importance of being Religious and its Effect on Health and Morale 14 Years Later.
    Atchley, Robert C. (1997)
    Journal of Aging Studies 11: 131-141.

    Analyzes 1978 & '91 panel data in an Ohio town, from respondents aged 50+ in 1975. Salience & other measures of religiosity had no perceptible health & morale effect after 14 years.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Well-being; Gerontology; Medical; Salience
  • Modeling the cross-sectional relationships between religion, physical health, social support, and depressive symptoms.
    Koenig, Harold G., Judith C. Hays, Linda K. George, Dan G. Blazer, David Larson, and Lawrence R. Landerman (1997)
    American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry 5:2: 131-144,

    Associated Search Terms: Social support; Mental health; Depression; Health
  • Frequent Attendance at Religious Services and Mortality over 28 years.
    Strawbridge, William J., Richard D. Cohen, Sarah J. Shema, and George A. Kaplan (1997)
    American Journal of Public Health 87:6: 957-961.

    Analyzes 1965-94 panel data; frequent attenders, especially females, had lower mortality rates in part because they made healthy changes in life style.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, California, Alameda County; Medical; Practice; Mortality
  • Healthy Clergy, Wounded Healers: Their Families and Their Ministries.
    Walmsley, Roberta Chapin, and Adair T. Lummis (1997)
    New York: Church Publishing Incorporated.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Clergy spouses; Clergy
  • Religion and Subjective Health among Black and White Elders.
    Musick, Marc A. (1996)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 37: 221-237.

    Analyzes longitudinal data from elders in 5 North Carolina counties; religion predicts self health ratings only when physical health is not controlled for.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; United States, North Carolina; Medical
  • Does Religious Observance Promote Health? Mortality in Secular vs. Religious Kibbutzim in Israel.
    Kark, Jeremy D., Galia Shemi, Yehiel Friedlander, Oz Martin, Orly Manor, and S.H. Blondheim (1996)
    American Journal of Public Health 86:3: 341-346.

    Associated Search Terms: Commune; Mortality; Kibbutz; Jewish, Israel; Israel; Health; Comparative
  • Hospital Caregivers' Own Religion in Relation to Their Perceptions of Psychosocial Inputs into Health and Healing.
    Scherer, Ross P. (1996)
    Review of Religious Research 37;4: 302-324.

    Analyzes 1989 data from caregivers in 3 suburban Chicago hospitals.

    Associated Search Terms: Nurse; Medical; United States, Illinois, Chicago; Physician
  • Religion, Health, and Nonphysical Senses of Self.
    Idler, Ellen L. (1995)
    Social Forces 74:2: 683-704.

    Analyzes interview data from rehabilitation clinic clients; self-rated religiousness correlated with perceived health.

    Associated Search Terms: Self; Medical
  • Religious Effects on Health Status and Life Satisfaction Among Black Americans.
    Levin, Jeffrey S., Linda M. Chatters, and Robert Joseph Taylor (1995)
    Journal of Gerontology 50(B):3: S154-S163.

    Associated Search Terms: Life satisfaction; Medical; African Americans; Health
  • Being Needful: Family, Love, and Prayer among AIDS Volunteers.
    Chambré, Susan M. (1995)
    Research in the Sociology of Health Care 12: 113-139.

    Associated Search Terms: AIDS; Voluntarism; Prayer
  • Lack of Social Participation or Religious Strength and Comfort as Risk Factors for Death after Cardiac Surery in the Elderly.
    Oxman, T.E., D.H. Freeman, and E.D. Manheimer (1995)
    Psychosomatic Medicine 57: 5-15.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Health
  • Race, Religious Involvement and Depressive Symptomatology in a Southeastern U.S. Community.
    Ellison, Christopher G. (1995)
    Social Science and Medicine 40:11: 1561-1572.

    Analyzes 1983-84 interview data from 5 North Carolina counties; attendance varies inversely with depressive symptoms for whites, no denomination positively with them among blacks, private prayer positively with them among both.

    Associated Search Terms: Depression; Mental health; African Americans; Race; United States, South
  • Religious Involvement among Unmarried Adolescent Mothers: A Source of Emotional Support?
    Sorenson, Ann Marie, Carl F. Grinstaff, and R. Jay Turner (1995)
    Sociology of Religion 56:1: 71-81.

    Analyzes 1984-86 interview data from young unmarried mothers in southwest Ontario; religious involvement was related to depression scores.

    Associated Search Terms: Mother, unmarried; Adolescents; Depression; Canada, Ontario; Mental health
  • Religion and Mental Health: Mormons and Other Groups.
    Bergin, Allen E., I. Reed Payne, Paul H. Jenkins, and Marie Cornwall (1994)
    In Marie Cornwal, Tim B. Heaton, and Lawrence A. Young (eds.), Contemporary Mormonism. Social Science Perspectives. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, pp. 138-158.

    Reviews the literature on the mental health of American Mormons.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Mormon, U.S.A.
  • Religion and Health among Black and White Adults.
    Ferraro, Kenneth F., and Jerome R. Koch (1994)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 33:4: 362-375.

    Analyzes 1986 questionnaire data from American adults; among African Americans only, health status correlates with religious practice & inversely with religious consolation.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Health; Consolation; Medical; African Americans; United States
  • Cohesiveness and Coherence: Religion and the Health of the Elderly.
    Idler, Ellen L. (1994)
    New York: Garland.

    Analyzes 1982 interview data from elderly residents in New Haven; finds positive health effects of religion.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; United States, Connecticut, New Haven; Medical
  • Religion and health: Is there an assocation, is it valid, and is it causal?
    Levin, Jeffrey S. (1994)
    Social Science and Medicine 38(11):1475-1482.

    Associated Search Terms: Health
  • The Characteristics of Northern Black Churches with Community Health Outreach Programs.
    Thomas, Stephen B., Sandra Crouse Quinn, Andrew Billingsley, and Cleopatra Howard Caldwell (1994)
    American Journal of Public Health 84:4: 575-579.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; African Americans; Parish
  • Control and Responsibility: Moral and Religious Issues in Lay Health Accounts.
    Mullen, Kenneth (1994)
    Sociological Review 42:3: 414-437.

    Based on interviews with Glasgow males aged 30-49; finds active & fatalist dimensions in the thinking on health issues, active being personal, social, religious.

    Associated Search Terms: Moral; Medical; Great Britain, Scotland, Glasgow
  • Psychiatric Symptoms and Help-seeking Behavior among the Elderly: An Analysis of Racial and Gender Differences.
    Husaini, Baqar A., Stephen T. Moore, and Van A. Cain (1994)
    Journal of Gerontologial Social Work 21:3/4: 177-195.

    Analyzes interview data from African American & white seniors in Nashville; gives percentage using clergy as mental health professionals.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Mental health; United States, Tennessee, Nashville; Gerontology; Sex
  • Religion, the Life Stress Paradigm, and the Study of Depression.
    Ellison, Christopher G. (1994)
    In Jeffrey S. Levin (ed.), Religion in Aging and Health: Theoretical Foundations and Methodological Frontiers. Newbury Park, California: Sage, pp. 78-121.

    Reviews observations & hypotheses pertaining to religious resources for coping with stress & mitigating depression.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Mental health; Stress; Depression; Well-being; Coping
  • Misattribution and Social Control in the Children of God.
    Kent, Stephen A. (1994)
    Journal of Religion and Health 33:1: 29-43.

    Associated Search Terms: Social control; Children of God
  • Religion and Well-being among Canadian University Students: The Role of Faith Groups on Campus.
    Frankel, B. Gail, and Warren Edward Hewitt (1994)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 33:1: 62-73.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from University of Western Ontario students; shows members of Christian church groups enjoying better health than non-affiliates.

    Associated Search Terms: Well-being; Students, undergraduate; Medical
  • Religious Involvement among Older African Americans.
    Chatters, Linda M., and Robert J. Taylor (1994)
    In Jeffey S. Levin (ed.) Religion in Aging and Health: Theoretical Foundations and Methodological Frontiers, Thousand Oaks, California: Sage, pp. 196-230.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Gerontology
  • The Measurement of Religion in Epidemiologic Studies: Problems and Prospects.
    Williams, David R. (1994)
    In Jeffrey S. Levin (ed.) Religion in Aging and Health: Theoretical Foundations and Methodological Frontiers, Thousand Oaks, California: Sage, pp. 125-148.

    Associated Search Terms: Measurement; Epidemiology
  • Church-agency Relationships and Social Service Networks in the Black Community of New Haven.
    Chang, Patricia Mei Yin, David R. Williams, Ezra E.H. Griffith, and John L. Young (1994)
    Nonprofit and Voluntary Sector Quarterly 23:2: 91-105. [Also in Nicholas J. Demerath III, Peter Dobkin Hall, Terry Schmitt, & Rhys H. Williams (eds.), Sacred Companies. Organizational Aspects... (NY: Oxford University Press, 1998), pp. 340-348]

    Examines the Black churches in New Haven as facilitators in the delivery of psychological services.

    Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Mental health; United States, Connecticut, New Haven; Social services
  • Health Care.
    Huntington, Gertrude Enders (1993)
    In Donald B. Kraybill (ed.), The Amish and the State. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, pp. 163-189.

    Amish have wanted to adopt public health measures on the basis of their own responsibility, not under compulsion from the outside.

    Associated Search Terms: Amish, U.S.A.; Medical
  • The New Religions and Mental Health.
    Saliba, John A. (1993)
    In David G. Bromley and Jeffrey K. Hadden (eds.), Religion and the Social Order. Volume 3 The Handbook on Cults and Sects in America (Part B). Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press, pp. 99-113.

    Reviews the psychological & Psychiatric literature on the effects of membership in new religions.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; New religions
  • The role of religious leaders in changing sexual behaviour in southwest Nigeria in an era of AIDS.
    Orubuloye, I. Olatunji, John C. Caldwell, and Pat Caldwell (1993)
    Health Transition Review 3: 93-104.

    Associated Search Terms: AIDS; Clergy; Nigeria; Sexual activity; Health
  • Christians' Attitudes toward Mental Health Intervention in the Church: An Exploratory Study.
    Kunst, Jennifer L. (1993)
    Review of Religious Research 34:3: 225-234.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from a varied population of American Protestants; shows theological conservatives less open to secular psychology & more open to pastors' interventions.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Belief; Conservative
  • Health and Healing in New Religious Movements.
    McGuire, Meredith B. (1993)
    In David G. Bromley and Jeffrey K. Hadden (eds.) Religion and the Social Order. Volume 3 The Handbook on Cults and Sects in America (Part B). Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press, pp. 139-155.

    Reviews the literature in terms of the professional dominance of medicine, the medicalization of deviance & other aspects of life, & the place of religion in modern society.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; New religions; Healing
  • Factors Predictive of Long-term Coronary Heart Disease Mortality Among 10,059 Male Israeli Civil Servants and Municipal Employees.
    Goldbourt, U., S. Yaari, and J.H. Medalie (1993)
    Cardiology 82: 100-121.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, Israel; Israel; Health
  • Religious Ritual and Mental Health.
    Jacobs, Janet L. (1992)
    In John F. Schumaker (ed.), Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 291-299.

    Reviews literature on the cathartic effects of religious ritual.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Ritual
  • Mental Health of Cult Consumers: Legal and Scientific Controversy.
    Richardson, James T. (1992)
    In John F. Schumaker (ed.) Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 233-244.

    Critique of an attempt to describe involvement in new religions as mentally unhealthful.

    Associated Search Terms: New religions; Mental health
  • Health and Spirituality as Contemporary Concerns.
    McGuire, Meredith B. (1992)
    Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social science 527: 144-154.

    Overview of health & healing as religious themes in the United States.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Healing
  • Religious Attendance and the Subjective Health of the Elderly.
    Broyles, Philip A., and Cynthia K. Drenovsky (1992)
    Review of Religious Research 34:2: 152-160.

    Analyzes telephone survey data from people aged 55 & over in Washington State; finds religious attendance has an independent effect on subjective health.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; United States, Washington; Practice; Gerontology
  • Aging and Religious Participation: Reconsidering the Effects of Health.
    Ainlay, Stephen C., Royce Singleton, Jr., and Victoria L. Swigert (1992)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 31:2: 175-188.

    Analyzes 1990 interview data from older residents of Worcester, MA; shows church activity positively correlated with subjective health, negatively with functional impairments.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Gerontology; United States, Massachusetts, Worcester
  • Religion and Self-actualization.
    Tamney, Joseph B. (1992)
    In John F. Schumaker (ed.) Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 132-137.

    Proposes self-actualization as a life style that has found a place in some traditions but is resisted in others.

    Associated Search Terms: Self-actualization; Mental health
  • Healing Homophobia: Volunteerism and 'Sacredness' in AIDS
    Kayal, Philip M. (1992)
    Journal of Religion and Health 31:2: 113-128.

    Events in New York City suggest that communal support for AIDS victims reveals the sacred outside of institutional religion & thereby overcomes the legitimation of hostility toward homosexuals.

    Associated Search Terms: Legitimation; AIDS; Prejudice, anti-homosexual; Sacred; Homosexuality; Gemeinschaft
  • Crime, Delinquency, and Religion.
    Bainbridge, William Sims (1992)
    In John F. Schumaker (ed.), Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 199-210.

    Reviews the literature.

    Associated Search Terms: Criminology; Delinquency
  • Religion and Marital Adjustment.
    Hansen, Gary L. (1992)
    In John F. Schumaker (ed.), Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 189-198.

    Reviews the literature; shows religion continuing to enhance marital adjustment.

    Associated Search Terms: Marriage
  • Religiosity, Depression, and Suicide.
    Stack, Steven (1992)
    In John F. Schumaker (ed.) Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 87-97.

    Reviews the literature on religion helping prevent suicide.

    Associated Search Terms: Suicide
  • Religion and Substance Abuse.
    Benson, Peter L. (1992)
    In John F. Schumaker (ed.), Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 211-220.

    Reviews the literature on religion lowering substance abuse rates.

    Associated Search Terms: Tobacco; Alcohol; Drug
  • Religion, Disability, Depression, and the Timing of Death.
    Idler, Ellen L., and Stanislav V. Kasl (1992)
    American Journal of Sociology 97:4: 1052-1079.

    Analyzes 1982 interview data from independently living elderly people in New Haven; shows religious involvement favorably affecting health, especially prior to major religious holidays.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; United States, Connecticut, New Haven; Medical; Death
  • Religious Community, Individual Religiosity, and Health: A Tale of Two Kibbutzim.
    Anson, Ofra, Arieh Levenson, Benyamin Maoz, and Dan Y. Bonneh (1991)
    Sociology 25:1: 119-132.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from a secular & a religious kibbutz; the latter had better mental & physical health, but its more prayerful members had worse health.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Jewish, Israel; Commune; Kibbutz; Medical; Israel
  • Religious Commitment and Mental Health: A Review of the Empirical Literature.
    Gartner, John, Dave B. Larson, and George D. Allen (1991)
    Journal of Psychology and Theology 19:1: 6-25.

    Religiosity is inversely related to mental health when the latter is measured by paper-&-pencil tests, correlated with it when it is measured with behavioral events. Distinctions in kinds of religion explain some inconsistencies.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health
  • Does Religion Influence Adult Health?
    Ferraro, Kenneth F., and Cynthia M. Albrecht-Jensen (1991)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 30:2: 193-202.

    Analyzes 1984 & 1987 General Social Survey (U.S.A..) data.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; United States
  • Coping with Breast Cancer: The Role of Clergy and Faith.
    Johnson, Sarah C., and Bernard Spilka (1991)
    Journal of Religion and Health 30: 21-33.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from mastectomy patients; satisfaction with clergy visits correlated with number of home visits, Bible reading understanding the patient, & talking about church affairs, & inversely with reluctance to discuss breast cancer.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy role; Medical; Hospital chaplain
  • Religious Involvement and Subjective Well-being.
    Ellison, Christopher G. (1991)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 32:1: 80-99.

    Analyzes 1988 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data; shows religious attendance & devotion reinforcing belief, & the latter directly furthering reported well-being.

    Associated Search Terms: Dimensions of religiosity; Belief; Well-being; United States
  • Religion, Health and Illness./Religion, santé et maladie.
    McGuire, Meredith B. (1991)
    Concilium 1991:2: 83-94./Concilium 234: 109-122.

    Notes the historical differentiation of religion from medicine & a rediscovery of their mutual relevance.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Differentiation
  • Enjoying God Forever: An Historical/Sociological Profile of the Health and Wealth Gospel in America.
    Hollinger, Denis (1991)
    In Peter Gee and John Fulton (eds.), Religion and Power, Decline and Growth: Sociological Analyses of Religion in Britain, Poland, and the Amricas. London: British Sociological Association Sociology of Religion Study Group, pp. 53-66.

    Associated Search Terms: New Thought
  • Religion and Psychological Distress in a Community Sample.
    Williams, David R., David B. Larson, Robert E. Buckler, Richard C. Heckmann, and Carolina M. Pyle (1991)
    Social Science and Medicine 32:11: 1257-1262.

    Analyzes 1967 & '69 New Haven panel interview data; '67 religiosity predicted good '69 psychological stress scores, but not if '67 stress scores were controlled for. Public religion didn't prevent but helped cope with stress.

    Associated Search Terms: Coping; Stress; United States, Connecticut, New Haven; Mental health
  • Participation in Spiritual Healing, Religiosity, and Mental Health.
    Glick, Deborah C. (1990)
    Sociological Inquiry 60:2: 158-176.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Healing; Mental health
  • A Measure of Religiousness, and its Relation to Parent and Child Mental Health Variables.
    Strayhorn, Joseph M., Carla S. Weidman, and David Larson (1990)
    Journal of Community Psychology 18: 34-43.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Religiosity scale
  • Religion and Medicine: How Are They Related?
    Vanderpool, Harold Y., and Jeffrey S. Levin (1990)
    Journal of Religion and Health 29:9-20.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical
  • The Redefinition of the Situation: The Social Construction of Spiritual Healing Experiences.
    Glick, Deborah C. (1990)
    Sociology of Health and Illness 12:2: 151-168.

    Associated Search Terms: Definition of the situation; Experience; Healing; Social construction of reality
  • The Effect of Religious Concentration and Affiliation on County Cancer Mortality Rates.
    Dwyer, Jeffrey W., Leslie L. Clarke, and Michael K. Miller (1990)
    Journal of Health and Social Beahvior 31:2: 185-202.

    Ecological analysis of 1968-86 county data; Mormon & conservative & moderate Protestant populations correlated inversely with cancer morality; Catholic, Jewish, & liberal Protestant correlated positively with it.

    Associated Search Terms: Ecology; Medical; United States; Denomination (organizational entity)
  • Les Eglises comme recours thérapeutiques. Une histoire de maladie au Congo.
    Tonda, Joseph (1990)
    In Didier Passin and Yannick Jaffrey (eds.) Sociétés, développement et santé.

    Paris: Ellipses, pp. 110-120.

    Associated Search Terms: Republic of the Congo; Healing; Health
  • Religion and Psychological Distress.
    Ross, Catherine E. (1990)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 29:2: 236-245.

    Analysis of an Illinois sample shows a curvilinear effect of belief strength on distress.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Protestant, U.S.A.; United States, Illinois; Jewish, U.S.A.; Distress; Belief; Catholic, U.S.A.
  • New Religions, Mental Health, and Social Control.
    Rochford, E. Burke, Jr., Sheryl Purvis, and NeMar Eastman (1989)
    In Monty L. Lynn and David O. Moberg (eds.) Research in the Social Scientific Study of Religion, Vol. I. Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI press.

    Associated Search Terms: New religions; Medical; Social control
  • Divine Relations, Social Relations, and Well-being.
    Pollner, Melvin (1989)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 30:1: 92-104.

    Analyzes 1983-84 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data; shows quasi-interaction with the divine independently predicts subjective well-being.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Symbolic interactionism; Well-being, psychological; Prayer
  • Religious experience and public cult: The case of Mary Ann van Hoof.
    Zimdars-Swartz, Sandra L. (1989)
    Journal of Religion and Health 28:1: 36-57.

    Maintains that Mary Ann van Hoof's Marian visions, beginning in 1950, met both community & personal needs.

    Associated Search Terms: Marian; United States, Wisconsin, Necedah; Visions
  • Religious Life-styles and Mental Health: An Explortory Study.
    Bergin, Allen E., Randy D. Stinchfield, Thomas A. Gaskin, Kevin S. Masters, and Clyde E. Sullivan (1988)
    Journal of Counseling Psychology 35:1: 91-98.

    Analyzes questionnaire & open-ended interview data from Mormon undergraduates; saw no relation of mental health to religiosity, but continuous vs. discontinuous & mild vs. intense experience predicted better mental health.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Experience; Mormon; Students, undergraduate
  • Religious Factors in Aging, Adjustment, and Health: A Theoretical Overview.
    Levin, Jeffrey S. (1988)
    Journal of Religion and Aging 4: 133-146. [Also in William M. Clements (ed.) Religion, Aging and Health: A Global perspective (New York: Haworth Press, 1989)]

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Medical
  • Religion, Health, and Aging: A Review and Theoretical Integration.
    Koenig, Harold G., Mona Smiley, and Jo Ann Ploch Gonzales (1988)
    New York: Greenwood.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Gerontology
  • Is there a religious factor in health care utilization? A review.
    Schiller, Preston L., and Jeffrey S. Levin (1988)
    Social Science and Medicine 27:12: 1369-1379.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical
  • Religious Activities and Attitudes of Elder Adults in a Geriatric Assessment Clinic.
    Koenig, Harold G. (1988)
    Journal of the American Geriatrics Society 36:4: 362-374.

    Analyzes 1985-86 questionnaire data from elderly outpatients; finds high rates of orthodoxy, religious participation, devotionalism, & intrinsic religion integral to mental & physical health.

    Associated Search Terms: Devotionalism; Medical; Gerontology; Intrinsic/extrinsic; Orthodoxy (doctrinal); Practice
  • Is there a Religious Factor in Health?
    Levin, Jeffrey S., and Preston L. Schiller (1987)
    Journal of Religion and Health 26: 9-36.

    Reviews the literature on religious effects on rates of cardiovascular disease, hypertension & stroke, colitis & enteritis, etc.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical
  • Is Frequent Religious Attendance Really Conducive to Better Health? Toward an Epidemiology of Religion.
    Levin, Jeffrey S., and Harold Y. Vanderpool (1987)
    Social Science and Medicine 24:7: 589-600.

    Reviews the literature on the correlation of attendance & health; maintains that no conclusions can be drawn.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Practice
  • Belief systems and illness experiences.
    McGuire, Meredith B., and Debra J. Kantor (1987)
    In Julius A. Roth and Peter Conrad (eds.), The experience and management of chronic illness: Research in the sociology of health care (Vol. 6). Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press, pp. 221-248.

    Studies 3 alternative healing groups. Notes variations in definitions of health & illness.

    Associated Search Terms: Healing; Medical
  • Life-style and Health Status of American Catholic Priests.
    Fichter, Joseph H. (1987)
    Social Compass 34:4: 539-548.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, U.S.A.; Medical; Clergy
  • Religion et santé: le cas de la diétéique des Adventistes du 7e jour.
    Topalov, Anne-Marie (1987)
    Social Compass 34:4: 509-514.

    Notes health concerns were important in the evolution of the Seventh-day Adventist church.

    Associated Search Terms: Seventh-day Adventist; Medical
  • Health and the Holy in African and Afro-American Spirit Possession.
    Csordas, Thomas J. (1987)
    Social Science and Medicine 24:1: 1-12.

    Associated Search Terms: Africanist; Possession; Medical; African Americans
  • Religious Involvement and the Health of the Elderly: Some Hypotheses and an Initial Test.
    Idler, Ellen L. (1987)
    Social Forces 66: 226-238.

    Analyzes 1982 interview data from elderly residents of New Haven; shows an inverse relationship between public religious involvement & disability.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Connecticut, New Haven; Gerontology; Medical
  • Ministerial Discernment: An Application of the Lens Model to the Study of Decision Making.
    Wiener, Richard L., Thomas J. Kramer, and Miriam J. Nolan (1987)
    Review of Religious Research 29:1: 57-68.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from sisters in a southern U.S. province of an international order, who worked in education, health, community service, & diverse ministries.

    Associated Search Terms: Orders/congregations; Decision-making; Sisters; Catholic, U.S.A.
  • Religious Attendance and Subjective Health.
    Levin, Jeffrey S., and Kyriakos S. Markides (1986)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 25:1: 31-40.

    Studies 3 generations of Mexican Americans in San Antonio with 1981-82 data; shows religiosity as a proxy variable for functional health.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Texas, San Antonio; Medical; Mexican Americans; Generations; Gerontology
  • Religion, Health and Healing: Findings from a Southern City.
    Johnson, Daniel M., J. Sherwood Williams, and David G. Bromley (1986)
    Sociological Analysis 47;1: 66-73.

    analyzes 1984 telephone interview data from Richmond, Virginia; focuses on self-reported healings.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Virginia, Richmond; Medical; Healing
  • Psychosocial Wellness Among Spiritual Healing Adherents.
    Glick, Deborah C. (1986)
    Social Science and Medicine 22: 579-586.

    Associated Search Terms: Healing; Mental health
  • Maintenance of Religious Fundamentalism.
    Hood, Ralph W., Jr., Ronald J. Morris, and Paul J. Watson (1986)
    Psychological Reports 59: 547-559.

    Notes the paradigm defense phenomenon when fundamentalists encounter threatening ideologies. Cautions against labeling fundamentalist belief items or defense stances pathological, & notes class as a confounding factor.

    Associated Search Terms: Stratification; Fundamentalist; Mental health
  • Religion and Health in Mexican Americans.
    Levin, Jeffrey S., and Kyriakos S. Markides (1985)
    Journal of Religion and Health 24:1: 60-69.

    Analyzes 1981-82 interview data from 3 generation Mexican American families in San Antonio, Texas; attendance correlated with many indicators of health, but self-reported religiosity sometimes correlated with indicators of ill health.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Texas, San Antonio; Practice; Medical; Mexican Americans; Gerontology
  • L'Église et la Santé Sentale: Vers un Nouvel Engagement?
    Boudreau, Françoise (1985)
    Sociologie et sociétés 17:1: 93-108.

    Uses interview material to examine the involvement of clergy & religious in Quebec mental health services.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, Canada; Canada, Quebec; Mental health; Clergy role; Psychiatry; Medical
  • Religion and Youth Substance Abuse.
    Lorch, Barbara R., and Robert H. Hughes (1985)
    Journal of Religion and Health 24: 197-208.

    Analyzes 1983 questionnaire data from 7-12 grade students in & near Colorado Springs; salience of religion was most inversely related to substance abuse, membership less so; Fundamentalist denomination to less alcohol use, liberal to less heavy drug use.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug; Alcohol; Liberal, U.S.A.; United States, Colorado, Colorado Springs; Fundamentalist, U.S.A.; Students, secondary; Students, primary
  • From Rural Populism to Practical Christianity: The Modernization of the Seventh-day Adventist Movement.
    Theobald, Robin (1985)
    Archives de sciences sociales des religions 30:60:1: 109-130.

    Sees the health & welfare concerns within Seventh-day Adventism as a modernizing accommodation that balances its fundamentalist aspects.

    Associated Search Terms: Accommodation; Medical; Seventh-day Adventist; Change
  • The Health of American Catholic Priests: A Report and a Study.
    Fichter, Joseph H. (1985)
    Washington: United States Catholic Conference.

    Fichter did not author the Preface to this volume, & in his autobiography, Sociology of Good Works (Chicago: Loyola University Press, 1993, p. 39) repudiates it.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Clergy
  • The Confucian Paradigm of Man: A Sociological View.
    King, Ambrose Y.C., and M.H. Bond (1985)
    In Wen-shing Tseng and David Y.H. Wu (eds.) Chinese Culture and Mental Health. Orlando, Florida: Academic, pp. 29-45.

    Associated Search Terms: Confucian
  • Analysis of Health Practices among the Amish with Reference to Boundary Maintenance.
    Cavan, Ruth Shonle (1984)
    Communal Societies 4: 67-73.

    Associated Search Terms: Amish; Boundary maintenance; Medical
  • Pentecostal Healing: A Facet of the Personalistic Health System of Pakal-Na, a Village in Southern Mexico.
    Dirksen, Murl O. (1984)
    Unpublished Ph.D.. dissertation, University of Tennessee. [DA 45:2 A, p. 565]

    Based on field work & semantic differential data; finds Pentecostal healing perceived as personalist rather than naturalist.

    Associated Search Terms: Pentecostal, Mexico; Mexico, Chiapas, Pakal-Na; Healing; Medical; Semantic differential
  • Religiosity and Mental Health: A Critical Reevaluation and Meta-analysis.
    Bergin, Allen E. (1983)
    Professional Psychology: Research and Practice 14:2: 170-184.

    Reviews 24 studies of religion & mental health; finds no simple pattern & notes measurement problems that are being overcome with time.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health
  • Mental Health and the New Religions.
    Hargrove, Barbara J.W. (1983)
    Iliff Review 40:2: 25-36.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; New religions; Mental health
  • New Religious Movements and Mental Health.
    Kuner, Wolfgang (1983)
    In Eileen Barker (ed.) Of Gods and Men. New Religious Movements in the West. Macon, Georgia: Mercer University Press, pp. 255-263.

    Associated Search Terms: Children of God, Germany; Unification Church, Germany; Ananda Marga, Germany; Germany, West; Mental health
  • The Effect of Religious Commitment on Suicide: A Cross-national Analysis.
    Stack, Steven (1983)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 24: 362-374.

    Associated Search Terms: Suicide; Comparative
  • Religion and Suicide: A Research Note on Sociology's "One Law."
    Bankston, William B., H. David Allen, and Daniel S. Cunningham (1983)
    Social Forces 62:2: 521-528.

    Analyzes 1967-79 public health data on suicide for the parishes (counties) of Louisiana; shows the proportion Catholic not consistently related inversely to suicide rates; some support is given Durkheim's cultural integration model.

    Associated Search Terms: Integration (cultural); United States, Louisiana; Suicide
  • The Effect of the Decline in Institutionalized Religion on Suicide, 1954-1978.
    Stack, Steven (1983)
    Journal for the Scientific Sudy of Religion 22:3: 239-252.

    Uses public health statistics for suicide data, & Gallup Poll data for religious practice; shows a decline in formal religion principally responsible for increased suicide rates in the U.S.

    Associated Search Terms: Suicide; United States; Practice; Ecology
  • Religion and Pain: The Spiritual Dimensions of Health Care
    Fichter, Joseph H. (1981)
    New York: Crossroads.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical
  • Brainwashing and the Persecution of "Cults."
    Robbins, Thomas L., and Dick Anthony (1980)
    Journal of Religion and Health 19:1: 66-69.

    Critique of the concept, "brainwashing."

    Associated Search Terms: Brainwashing; Anti-cult movement
  • Strains and Facilities in the Interpretation of an African Prophet Movement.
    Mitchell, Robert Cameron (1979)
    In Louis Kriesberg (ed.) Research in Social Movements, Conflicts and Change. A Research Annual, vol. 2. Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press, pp. 187-218.

    Economic & health-related strains readied some of the Yoruba subtribes for the Babalola Movement (Christ Apostolic Cuhrch).

    Associated Search Terms: New religions; Historical; Nigeria, Ilesha; Christ Apostolic Church; Babalola Movement; Social movement; Healing; Prophet
  • Music and Health with a Key to Harmony: The English Experience.
    Martin, David (1979)
    InDavid O. Moberg (ed.) Spiritual Well-Being. Sociological Perspectives. Washington: University Press of America, pp. 205-213.

    Sees religious music as a surrogate for ritual in England.

    Associated Search Terms: Well-being; Music; Great Britain, England
  • Catharsis in Healing, Ritual, and Drama.
    Scheff, Thomas J. (1979)
    Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Associated Search Terms: Ritual; Mental health
  • Pentecostalism in the Context of Haitian Religion and Health Practice.
    Conway, Frederick J. (1978)
    Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, American University.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Pentecostal, Haiti; Haiti
  • RX: Spiritist as Needed. A Study of a Puerto Rican Community Mental Health Resource.
    Harwood, Alan (1977)
    New York: Wiley.

    Based on 1968-70 participant observation & interviews in an area served by a New York City health center; focuses on spirtualist healing among Puerto Ricans.

    Associated Search Terms: Puerto Rican Americans; Healing; Spiritualist, U.S.A.; Medical; United States, New York, New York
  • The Pessimistic Sect's Influence on the Mental Health of its Members: The Case of Jehovah's Witnesses.
    Montague, Havor (1977)
    Social Compass 24:1: 135-147.

    Advanced age & socio-economic status are more important contributors to the high rate of mental illness among Jehovah's Witnesses than anything inherent in the religion itself.

    Associated Search Terms: Jehovah´s Witness, U.S.A.; Mental health
  • An Empirical Typology of Religious Experience: Its Validation and Relationship to Psychotic Experience.
    Margolis, Robert D. (1977)
    Unpublished Ph.D.. dissertation, Georgia State University. [DA 39:1 B, p. 362]

    Content analysis & factor analysis of interview data from 45 people who reported having had religious experiences.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Experience; Factor analysis; Content analysis
  • Puerto Rican Spiritism: An Institution with Preventive and Therapeutic Functions in Community Psychiatry.
    Harwood, Alan (1977)
    Culture, Medicine, and Psychiatry 1: 135-153.

    Associated Search Terms: Spiritism; Puerto Rico; Medical; Healing; Health
  • The Clergy as a Mental Health Resource: I & II.
    Bell, Roger A., Robert R. Morris, Charles E. Holzer, and George J. Warheit (1976)
    Journal of Pastoral Care 30:2: 103-115.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy role; Mental health
  • Healing of Memories: Psychotherapeutic Ritual among Catholic Pentecostals.
    Csordas, Thomas J., and Steven Cross (1976)
    Journal of Pastoral Care 30: 245-257.

    Associated Search Terms: Ritual; Pentecostal, Catholic, U.S.A.; Mental health; Healing
  • Life-Style and Demography of Catholic Religious Sisterhoods and Health of Other Religious Groups.
    Fecher, Con J. (1975)
    Dayton, Ohio: University of Dayton Press.

    Associated Search Terms: Sisters; Orders/congregations; Catholic; Medical; Demography
  • Des rapports de la paranoïa avec une communauté 'intégriste' catholique.
    Salles, Yves (1975)
    Thèse pour le doctorat, Univesité de Bordeaux-II.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic; Integralism; Mental health
  • Socioeconomic Correlations of Attitudes toward Abortion in Rhode Island: 1971.
    Rao, S.L.N., and Leon F. Bouvier (1974)
    American Journal of Public Health 64: 765-774.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Rhode Island; Denomination (organizational entity); Abortion; Stratification
  • Some Dimensions of Interreligious Marriages in Indiana, 1962-1967.
    Monahan, Thomas P. (1973)
    Social Forces 52:2: 195-220.

    Based on 1962-67 Indiana sate public health data; compares rates of protestant, Catholic, & Jewish endogamy.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.; Protestant, U.S.A.; Marriage; United States, Indiana
  • Church Attendance and Health.
    Comstock, George W., and Kay B. Partridge (1972)
    Journal of Chronic Diseases 25: 665-672.

    Analyzes 1963 interview data from Washington County, Maryland; notes correlations of health-related phenomena with church attendance that may or may not be spurious.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Maryland, Washington County; Medical; Practice; Mortality
  • Health and Illness Behavior of Christian Scientists.
    Nudelman, Arthur E., and Barbara E. Nudelman (1972)
    Social Science and Medicine 6:2: 253-262.

    Analyzes interview data from undergraduate Christian Scientists attending a large Midwest U.S. university.

    Associated Search Terms: Students, undergraduate; Christian Science; Medical
  • The Influence of the Community on the Mental Health Role of Ministers.
    Bentz, W. Kenneth (1972)
    Review of Religious Research 14:1: 37-40.

    Analyzes data from 3 American communities.

    Associated Search Terms: Community; Medical; Clergy role
  • Psychopathology and Religious Commitment.
    Stark, Rodney (1971)
    Review of Religious Research 12:3: 165-176.

    Analyzes 1966 interview data from 100 patients from the San Mateo County (California) Mental Health Department, & from a control group; shows psychopathology inversely related to religiosity.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Religiosity; Psychopathology; United States, California, San Mateo County
  • Religious-ethnic Differences in Alcohol Consumption.
    Wechsler, Henry, Harold W. Demone, Jr., Denise Thum, and Elizabeth H. Kasey (1970)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 11:1: 21-29.

    Analyzes data from persons over 16 yrs. Old treated in the emergency room of Massachusetts General Hospital, 1966-67.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Massachusetts, Boston; Alcohol; Medical
  • The Origins and Correlates of Religious Adherence and Apostasy among Mental Health Professionals.
    Spray, S. Lee, and John H. Marx (1969)
    Sociological Analysis 30:3: 132-150.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from professional therapeutic personnel working in the Chicago, Los Angeles, & New York areas; focuses on religious biographies.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Atheist, U.S.A.; Psychologists; Disaffiliation
  • The Health of the Clergy. A Review of Demographic Literature.
    King, Haitung, and John C. Bailar, III (1969)
    Demography 1: 27-43.

    Reviews literature on clergy in Great Britain, U.S.A., Switzerland, & the city of Paris; some data are from the 19th century.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Demography; Medical; United States; Great Britain, Scotland; Great Britain, England; France, Paris; Clergy; Great Britain, Wales
  • Religious Affiliation and Psychopathology in a Mexican-American Population.
    Meadow, Arnold, and Louise Bronson (1969)
    Journal of Abnormal Psychology 74:2: 177-180.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from Mexican Americans in a southwest U.S. city; shows higher rates of psychopathological responses among Catholics than among Protestants. Proposes an explanation in terms of greater social support in small churches.

    Associated Search Terms: Mexican Americans; Mental health
  • Clergymen's Subjective Feelings of Competence When Dealing with Emotionally Disturbed People.
    Larson, Richard F. (1969)
    Review of Religious Research 10:3: 140-150.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from clergy in Rhode Island & Oklahoma; finds different propensities to refer people to psychiatrists by state & denomination.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; United States, Rhode Island; United States, Oklahoma; Protestant, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.; Clergy role
  • Consensus between Role Expectations and Role Behavior among Ministers.
    Bentz, W. Kenneth (1968)
    Community Mental Health 4:4: 301-306.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy role
  • Differences in Religious Attitudes in Mental Illness.
    Lowe, C. Marshall, and Roger O. Braaten (1966)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 5:3: 435-445.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from patients in a mental health facility; explores relationships between religiosity & illness variables.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health
  • Interfaith Marriage and Social Participation.
    Hepps, Robert B., and Elaine Dorfman (1966)
    Journal of Religion and Health 5: 324-333.

    Analyzes 1949-61 data from postmarital caucasian clients of a Philadelphia family counseling agency; compares socializing with friends by same-faith & interfaith couples.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, U.S.A.; Jewish, U.S.A.; Protestant, U.S.A.; Marriage; Socializing
  • Attitudes and Opinions of Clergymen about Mental Health and Causes of Mental Illness.
    Larson, Richard F. (1965)
    Mental Hygience 43:1: 52-59.

    Associated Search Terms: Stratification; Mental health; Clergy; Age; Medical
  • Cancer Mortality and Religious Preference: A Suggested Method in Research.
    King, Haitung, Earl Diamond, and John C. Baillar III (1965)
    Milbank Memorial Fund Quarterly 43: 349-358.

    Associated Search Terms: Methods; Health
  • Psychiatric Orientations of a Selected Sample of New England Clergy.
    Larson, Richard F. (1965)
    Mental Hygiene 49:3: 341-346.

    Analyzes 1963 questionnaire data from clergy in Rhode Island; shows class background & undergraduate training explain whether clergy thought it their role to refer rather than counsel emotionally disturbed people.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Rhode Island; Medical; Mental health; Clergy role
  • Durkheim, Mental Health and Religious Socialization.
    Zenter, Henry (1964)
    Sociological Inquiry 34:1: 92-107.

    Explains differences in mental illness rates of Catholics & Protestants in terms of the effects of different childhood myth systems.

    Associated Search Terms: Protestant; Mental health; Socialization; Durkheim, Émile; Catholic
  • The Study of the Educational, Health and Social Activities of Christian Religious Bodies in the Developing Countries.
    Houtart, François, and Jos Dhooge (1964)
    Social Compass 11:6: 49-52.

    Summary of a 1964 seminar for planning a study.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Education; Modernization
  • Clerical and Psychiatric Conception of the Clergyman's Role in the Therapeutic Setting.
    Larson, Richard F. (1964)
    Social Problems 11: 419-427.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Medical; Clergy role
  • Behavioral Science, Religion, and Mental Health.
    Allport, Gordon W. (1963)
    Journal of Religion and Health 2:3: 187-197.

    Argues for co-operation among religion, psychiatry, & social science; proposes the relevance to mental health of 2 kinds of religion--intrinsic & extrinsic.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Intrinsic/extrinsic
  • Folk-Rituals of the Misamis-Buikdnon Area: A Preliminary Report.
    Madigan, Francis C., and Zenaida N. Rebolos (1963)
    Philippine Sociological Review 11:1/2: 155-159.

    Describes health & food-related ceremonials; suggests they impede the acceptance of scientific agricultural practices, even among Christian farmers.

    Associated Search Terms: Syncretism; Science; Rural; Philippines, Mindanao; Folk religion
  • A Social Survey of Aged Catholics in the Deanery of Fort Wayne, Indiana.
    Theisen, Sylvester Peter (1962)
    Unpublished Ph.D.. dissertation, University of Notre Dame. [DA 22:12, p. 4434]

    Descriptive data from 1960 interviews with older Catholics in Fort Wayne on residence, health, income, leisure, life, politics, & religion; health made church attendance decrease with age.

    Associated Search Terms: Politics, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.; Gerontology; United States, Indiana, Fort Wayne; Practice
  • Religious Affiliation and Church Attendance in Metropolitan Centers.
    Cowhig, James D., and Leo F. Schnore (1962)
    American Catholic Sociological Review 23:2: 113-127.

    Analyzes 1952 survey data from U.S. cities; compares denominational distribution to results of other studies. Reports by nativity, marital status, family size, education, income, length of residence, home ownership, health, voting, church attendance.

    Associated Search Terms: Medical; Urban; Mobility (geographical); Politics, U.S.A.; Family; Protestant, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.; United States; Jewish, U.S.A.; Stratification; Education
  • The Dissonant Religious Context and Emotional Disturbance.
    Rosenberg, Morris (1962)
    American Journal of Sociology 68:1: 1-10.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from juniors & seniors at 10 New York state high schools; finds lower self-esteem, more psychosomatic symptoms of anxiety, & depression among students who belong to religions that are local minorities.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Students, secondary; Minority
  • Arationality in Human Behavior: A Study of Health Practices.
    Lewis, Lionel Stanley (1961)
    Unpublished Ph.D.. dissertation, Yale University.

    Associated Search Terms: Magic; Medical
  • The Changing Protestant Ethic: Rural Patterns in Health, Work, and Leisure.
    Goldstein, Bernice, and Robert L. Eichhorn (1961)
    American Sociological Review 26: 557-565.

    Analyzes data from farmers in the Purdue Farm Cardiac project; finds a work-orientation related to individualism & asceticism but not to rational or systematic economic activity.

    Associated Search Terms: Rationalization; Protestant Ethic; Asceticism; Economic; Rural
  • The Puerto Rican Spiritualist as a Psychiatrist.
    Rogler, Lloyd H., and August B. Hollingshead (1961)
    American Journal of Sociology 67:1: 17-21.

    Observes that spiritualist participation by lower class schizophrenics in San Juan renders their aberrant behavior institutionally meaningful.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Spiritualist, Puerto Rico; Puerto Rico, San Juan
  • The Parish Minister's Self-Image of His Master Role.
    Blizzard, Samuel W. (1958)
    Pastoral Psychology 9: 25-32. [Also in Wayne E. Oates (ed.), The Miniser's Own Mental Health (Great Neck, New York: Channel Press, 1961)]

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy role
  • The Protestant Parish Minister's Integrating Roles.
    Blizzard, Samuel W. (1958)
    Religious Education 53: 374-380. [Also in Wayne E. Oates (ed.), The Minister's Own Mental Health (Great Neck, New York: Channel Press, 1961)]

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy role; Integration (social)
  • Religious Practice and Cardiovascular Reactions During Stress.
    King, Stanley H., and Daniel Funkenstein (1958)
    In E. Gartly Jaco (ed.), Patients, Physicians, and Illness: A Source Book in Behavioral Science and Health. New York: Free Press, pp. 91-94.

    Associated Search Terms: Stress; Medical
  • The Development of Pastoral Counseling Programs in Protestantism: A Sociological Perspective.
    Johnson, Benton (1958)
    Pacific Sociological Review 1: 59-63.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy role; Pastoral counseling; Mental health; Seminary
  • Some Aspects of Christian Science as Reflected in Letters of Testimony.
    England, Jr., Ralph Wilbur (1954)
    American Journal of Sociology 59;5: 448-453.

    Describes the relationship between Christian Science's concern with physical health & its membership, dynamics, & appeal.

    Associated Search Terms: Christian Science; Testimonial
  • Length of Life of Male Religious: Society of Mary, 1820-1951.
    Kurz, John T. (1952)
    Unpublished M.A. thesis, St. Louis University.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Society of Mary; Orders/congregations; Health
  • Elementos magicos no folk mogiano.
    Xidieh, Oswaldo Elias (1943)
    Sociologia 5: 116-133.

    Notes class affects motives found in religious activity; the poor seek health, food, & necessities, the middle class focuses on ethics & discipline.

    Associated Search Terms: Magic; Brazil; Popular religion; Stratification; Moral; Medical
[Viewing Matches 1-470]  (of 470 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 10/16/2013
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2001:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2001 NASIS asks questions about outdoor and recreational activities, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, household composition, job situation, the care in nursing homes/assisted living facilities, voting behavior and the Nebraska Department of Roads.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 10/29/2018
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Contextual Database, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    To provide an array of community characteristics by which researchers may investigate the nature of such contextual influences for a wide range of adolescent health behaviors, selected contextual variables have been calculated and compiled. These are provided in this Contextual Database, already linked to the Add Health respondent IDs.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Network Data, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    This network data includes network variables constructed from the Add Health in-school data and friendship nominations.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use In-Home, In-School, and Parent Questionnaire Data, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Included in this dataset are the in-home interviews, in-school questionnaire, and parent questionnaire.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Grand Sample Weights, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Included here are weights to remove any differences between the composition of the sample and the estimated composition of the population. See the attached codebook for information regarding how these weights were calculated.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • Portraits of American Life Study, Merged Dataset, 2006-2012:
    The Portraits of American Life Study (PALS) is an extensive, national-level panel study focused on religion in the U.S., with a particular focus on capturing ethnic and racial diversity. PALS seeks to understand the impact of religion in everyday life, and ultimately the connections between religious change and other forms of change in individuals and families over the course of their lives and across generations. It includes substantive modules on family relationships, deviance, health, civic participation and volunteering, moral and social attitudes, and race and ethnic issues. It currently includes two waves, collected in 2006 and 2012. This file contains only the respondents who were in both waves (N=1,314).

    ARDA Note: The ARDA coded the variable names in a way that is easy to identify across waves. The variable names have stems (e.g., CA23), and the suffix (e.g., W1) will tell you wave of the corresponding variable. "W1" refers to Wave 1, "06" refers to Wave 1 variables that may not have been in the original Wave 1 dataset, and no suffix means that the variable is a Wave 2 variable. For example, CA23W1 belongs to Wave 1 and CA23 belongs to Wave 2. In all instances, examine the variable description, which contains the wave information (e.g., [Wave 2]) and the full question wording.
    Funded By: Lilly Endowment Inc. Kinder Institute, Rice University University of Notre Dame
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 6/8/2015
  • Portraits of American Life Study, 1st Wave, 2006:
    The Portraits of American Life Study (PALS) is an unprecedented, multi-level panel study focused on religion in the United States, with a particular focus on capturing ethnic and racial diversity. The PALS seeks to show the impact of religion in everyday life, and ultimately the connections between religious change and other forms of change in individuals and families over the course of their lives and across generations. It includes substantive modules on family relationships, deviance, health, civic participation and volunteering, moral and social attitudes, and race and ethnic issues. In time, this panel study is expected to develop into a multi-wave longitudinal study comprising both individual and congregational level data. This study was formerly known as the Panel Study of American Religion and Ethnicity (PS-ARE).
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment Inc. University of Notre Dame Rice University
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 4/23/2010
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Examination Data, 2007-2008:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999 the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions were also asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2007-2008 wave, the NHANES includes 69 datasets. These have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES webssite .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 2/1/2016
  • Portraits of American Life Study, 2nd Wave, 2012:
    The Portraits of American Life Study (PALS) is an extensive, national-level panel study focused on religion in the U.S., with a particular focus on capturing ethnic and racial diversity. PALS seeks to understand the impact of religion in everyday life, and ultimately the connections between religious change and other forms of change in individuals and families over the course of their lives and across generations. It includes substantive modules on family relationships, deviance, health, civic participation and volunteering, moral and social attitudes, and race and ethnic issues. It currently includes 2 waves, collected in 2006 and 2012. This file refers to the cases in the second wave only. Of the 1,417 respondents in Wave 2, 1,314 were from Wave 1 and 103 were new respondents.
    Funded By: Lilly Endowment Inc. Kinder Institute, Rice University University of Notre Dame
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 6/8/2015
  • General Social Survey, 2006:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS is designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 2006 GSS features special modules on mental health and social networks. Items on religion cover denominational affiliation, church attendance, religious upbringing, personal beliefs, and religious experiences.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 9/14/2007
  • General Social Survey, 2004:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 2004 data contain twelve topical modules, including modules on daily spiritual experiences and religious transformations.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , CIRCLE, the Fetzer Institute , the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health , the Metanexus Institute , the Institute for Research on Unlimited Love , the National Human Genome Research Institute , the Smith Richardson Foundation , the Bureau of the Census , the Russell Sage Foundation , and Yale University .
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/9/2005
  • Houston Area Survey, 1982-2010:
    For the past 28 years, these countywide, random-digit-dialed, computer-assisted telephone surveys have systematically measured the continuities and changes in demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes and beliefs among successive representative samples of Harris County residents. Using identical items across the years, with new questions added periodically, the annual Houston Area Survey (HAS) has tracked America's fourth largest city in the process of fundamental transformation.

    Houston recovered from deep recession in the 1980s to find itself squarely in the midst of a restructured economy and a demographic revolution. New economic, educational, and environmental challenges have redefined the "pro-growth" strategies required for urban prosperity in the twenty-first century. At the same time, major immigration flows have transformed Houston into one of the nation's most culturally diverse metropolitan areas, at the center of the transformations that are refashioning the social and political landscape of urban America. The overall purpose of this continuing project is to measure systematically the way area residents are responding to these remarkable changes, and to make the findings of this research widely available to the general public and to research scholars everywhere.

    Conducted annually during February and March, the interviews measure perspectives on the local and national economies, on poverty programs, interethnic relationships, and the new immigration; beliefs about discrimination and affirmative action, about education, crime, health care, taxation, and community service; assessments of downtown development, mobility and transit, land-use controls, and environmental concerns; attitudes toward abortion, homosexuality, and other aspects of "the social agenda." They record religious and political orientations, as well as a rich array of demographic and immigration characteristics, socioeconomic indicators, and family structures.
    Funded By: AT&T Foundation, Gallery Furniture, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Houston Chronicle, Houston Endowment Inc., Swalm Foundation, United Way of Greater Houston, Vinson & Elkins L.L.P., Amegy Bank, Bank of America, CenterPoint Energy, Fiesta Mart, H-E-B Company, Jain & Jain CPAs, JPMorganChase-Houston, KHOU-TV Channel 11, Memorial Hermann Hospital System, Palmetto Partners Ltd., Pinto America Growth Fund L.P., Sterling Bank, Wachovia Foundation, Wells Fargo, American Leadership Forum, Houston/Gulf Coast Chapter, BMC Software Inc., Center for, Houston's Future, Compass Bank, CRC Foundation, Deloitte & Touche, The Everett Family Fund, Fulbright & Jaworski L.L.P., Group 1 Automotive Inc., Hines Interests Limited Partnership, Houston Rockets, Indo-American Charity Foundation, Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston, Jacob and Terese Hershey Foundation, KTRK-TV Channel 13, Leadership Houston, Linbeck Group L.P., Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell L.L.P, Lovett Homes Inc., Management Leadership for, Tomorrow-Houston, Marek Brothers Systems Inc, Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw L.L.P., Merrill Lynch, MetroNational,, Reliant Energy, Shell Oil Company Foundation, Stanford and Joan Alexander Foundation, State Farm Insurance, Companies, Texas Children's Hospital, Waste Management Inc., Whitney National Bank, Wulfe and Co., F. J. Hank, Coleman, Jr., Janice M. Crawford, John Walsh, The Honorable Bob Lanier, Linda L. S. Moroney, Eugene Vaughan
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/3/2010
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Laboratory Data, 2007-2008:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999 the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions were also asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2007-2008 wave, the NHANES includes 69 datasets. These have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 2/1/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Contextual Database, Wave II:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    To provide an array of community characteristics by which researchers may investigate the nature of such contextual influences for a wide range of adolescent health behaviors, selected contextual variables have been calculated and compiled. These are provided in this Contextual Database, already linked to the Add Health respondent IDs.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 1/8/2016
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Questionnaire Data, 2007-2008:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999 the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions were also asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2007-2008 wave, the NHANES includes 69 datasets. These have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2007-2008 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 2/1/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Children and Parenting Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV children and parenting data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Inflammation and Immune Function Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV measures of inflammation and immune function.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Glucose Homeostasis Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV measures of glucose homeostasis.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use In-Home Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV in-home questionnaire data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Lipids Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV lipids data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Pregnancy Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV pregnancy data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Relationships Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV relationship data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Relationships (Time Segments) Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV relationships (time segments) data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Weights, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV weights.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Live Births Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV live births data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use In-Home Questionnaire Data, Wave II:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Included in this dataset is the in-home interviews.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 1/8/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Live Births Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are data on live births.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Children and Parenting Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are data on children and parenting.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Completed Pregnancies Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are data on completed pregnancies.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Current Pregnancies Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are data on current pregnancies.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Education Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are education data, including math and science transcript data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Education Data Weights, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included here are education data weights.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Graduation Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are graduation data, including high school exit status.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Pregnancy Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are data on pregnancy.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Relationships Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are data on partners and relationships.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Relationships in Detail Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are partner and relationship details.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Peabody Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT) Score Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included here is the Picture Vocabulary Test (PVT).
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use School Weights, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included here are school weights.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Weights, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included here are weights to remove any differences between the composition of the sample and the estimated composition of the population.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use In-Home Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset is the in-home questionnaire data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
  • General Social Survey, 2002:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 2002 GSS include questions on religious self-identification, denominational affiliation, church attendance, personal beliefs, and religious upbringing.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 11/17/2003
  • General Social Survey, 2000:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 2000 GSS include a module on religion (with items measuring religious self-identification, religious schooling, congregational affiliation, church attendance, and local church performance).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 4/12/2002
  • General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing):
    This file differs from the General Social Survey 2012 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 3/17/2014
  • General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2012 General Social Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 10/9/2014
  • National Survey of Family Growth - Wave 6 (2002) Female Respondent File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews completed with 12,571 respondents 15-44 years of age--7,643 females and 4,928 males. The main purpose of the NSFG surveys have been to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals. Cycle 6 expands upon this mission by interviewing male respondents for the first time.

    The female respondent file uses each female respondent as the unit of analysis and contains detailed fertility histories, social characteristics, and personal histories of each respondent (including religion variables), as well as selected characteristics of each respondent's pregnancy history. The recodes were created to simpify analyses, and are provided for key variables in virtually every topic.

    Using the common identification number (CASEID), and the pregnancy number (PREGORDR), the interval and respondent files can be merged to produce a file containing both respondent information and pregnancy information. The resulting file can be either respondent-based (up to 12,571 records) or interval-based (up to 13,593 records).
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 4/3/2009
  • National Survey of Family Growth - Wave 6 (2002) Pregnancy File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews completed with 12,571 respondents 15-44 years of age--7,643 females and 4,928 males. The main purpose of the NSFG surveys have been to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals. Cycle 6 expands upon this mission by interviewing male respondents for the first time.

    The pregnancy file uses each pregnancy mentioned by a respondent as the unit of analysis and contains detailed pregnancy histories and wantedness of pregnancies, as well as selected respondent characteristics. The recodes were created to simpify analyses, and are provided for key variables in virtually every topic.

    Using the common identification number (CASEID), and the pregnancy number (PREGORDR), the interval and respondent files can be merged to produce a file containing both respondent information and pregnancy information. The resulting file can be either respondent-based (up to 12,571 records) or interval-based (up to 13,593 records).
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 4/3/2009
  • Religion and Public Life Survey, 2007:
    This project investigated the public's attitudes on religion and public life. This survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced two reports. The first is titled "Clinton and Giuliani Seen as Not Highly Religious; Romney's Religion Raises Concerns", and the second is titled "Public Expresses Mixed Views of Islam, Mormonism". This survey asked questions on a variety of topics including: public leaders and religion, political parties and religion, abortion, stem cell research, universal health care, the death penalty, gay marriage, attitudes towards religious groups, attitudes towards Muslims and Mormons, and many other topics.
    Funded By: The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 2/6/2009
  • General Social Survey, 1996:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about the Bible, attitudes toward organized religion and its opponents, and more. In addition, it contains a special module examining respondents' images of God. The survey also contains topical modules on national identity, the role of government, and mental health.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 11/10/2008
  • Religion and Public Life Survey, 2008:
    This project investigated the public's attitudes on religion and public life. This survey was commissioned by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and produced two reports. The first report is titled "GOP Base Getting Behind McCain: The Presidential Race Draws Even," and the second report is titled "Some Social Conservative Disillusionment: More Americans Question Religion's Role in Politics." Many of the questions in this survey investigated views on the 2008 presidential election and probed the dynamics of support for John McCain and Barack Obama. In addition, this survey asked questions on a variety of topics including: public leaders and religion, political parties and religion, government funding for religious social services, universal health care, abortion, gay marriage, attitudes towards religious groups, and other topics.
    Funded By: The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 5/21/2010
  • Detroit Area Study, 1997: Social Change in Religion and Child Rearing:
    Respondents from three counties in the Detroit area were queried about their work, health, marriage and family, finances, political views, religion and child rearing. With respect to finances, respondent views were asked about credit card purchases, recording expenditures and investments. Regarding political views, respondents were questioned about political preferences, presidential values, freedom of speech, nuclear war and the interest of public officials. Questions also addressed religious beliefs and experiences, including the religiosity of respondents' parents, belief in and relationship with God, the relationship between science and religion, school prayer, divorce, homosexuality, interfaith marriages, religion of friends and observance of religious holy days. Questions were asked about the views of respondents' religious leaders on issues including drinking, abortion, and test-tube fertilization. Regarding child rearing, questions were asked pertaining to religious training given to child(ren) and frequency of prayer before meals. Background information includes marital status, employment, political orientation and income.
    Funded By: University of Michigan
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 10/16/2013
  • American Time Use Survey, 2006:
    The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau . The data file available for download from the ARDA combines three files from the 2006 ATUS: the Respondent file, the Activity summary file and the Eating & Health Module. Variables from the 2006 Eating & Health Module have names that begin with the letter 'E.'
    Funded By: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics . The Eating & Health module is also sponsored by the USDA's Economic Research Service and the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute.
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 11/8/2013
  • National Health Interview Survey, Complementary and Alternative Medicine Supplement, 2002:
    "The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a multi-purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian, noninstitutionalized, household population in the United States. The NHIS has been conducted continuously since its beginning in 1957." (NHIS Survey Description, Public Use Data Release, December 2003). "The Alternative Health/Complementary and Alternative Medicine Supplement collected information from sample adults on their use of 17 non-conventional health care practices." These practices include prayer and spiritual healing.
    Funded By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine , National Institutes of Health
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 8/19/2016
  • American Time Use Survey, 2007:
    The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau . The data file available for download from the ARDA combines three files from the 2007 ATUS: the Respondent file, the Activity summary file and the Eating & Health Module. Variables from the 2007 Eating & Health Module have names that begin with the letter 'E.'
    Funded By: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics . The Eating & Health module is also sponsored by the USDA's Economic Research Service and the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute.
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 11/22/2013
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Questionnaire Data, 2005-2006:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2005-2006 wave, the NHANES includes over 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Not all files from the 2005-2006 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e., some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods -- First Day)
    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods -- Second Day)
    Examination: Food Frequency Questionnaire -- DietCalc Output
    Examination: Physical Activity Monitor
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 8/19/2016
  • Religion and Politics Survey, January 2016:
    The January 2016 Political Survey, fielded for the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press by Abt SRBI, obtained telephone interviews with a representative sample of 2,009 adults living in the United States (504 respondents were interviewed on a landline telephone and 1,505 were interviewed on a cell phone). Interviewing was conducted from January 7th to 14th, 2016 in English and Spanish. Samples were drawn from both the landline and cell phone RDD frames. Persons with residential landlines were not screened out of the cell phone sample. Both the landline and cell phone samples were provided by Survey Sampling International. The combined sample is weighted to match demographic parameters from the American Community Survey and telephone status parameters from the National Health Interview Survey. The weighting procedure also accounts for the fact that respondents with both a landline and cell phone had a greater probability of selection. The margin of sampling error for weighted estimates based on the full sample is +/- 2.46 percentage points.
    Funded By: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press
    Collected: 2016, Uploaded 4/3/2017
  • General Social Survey, 1998:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 1998 GSS include special modules on religion (with items measuring giving, volunteering, religious self-identification, religious schooling, congregational affiliation, and spiritualism), culture, job experiences, inter-racial friendships, national security, medical care, medical ethics, and the social security system.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA’s Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 1998, Uploaded 12/20/2000
  • American Time Use Survey, 2008:
    The American Time Use Survey (ATUS) is the nation's first federally administered, continuous survey on time use in the United States. The goal of the survey is to measure how people divide their time among life's activities. In the ATUS, individuals are randomly selected from a subset of households that have completed their eighth and final month of interviews for the Current Population Survey (CPS). ATUS respondents are interviewed only one time about how they spent their time on the previous day, where they were and whom they were with. The survey is sponsored by the Bureau of Labor Statistics and is conducted by the U.S. Census Bureau . The data file available for download from the ARDA combines three files from the 2008 ATUS: the Respondent file, the Activity summary file and the Eating & Health Module. Variables from the 2008 Eating & Health Module have names that begin with the letter 'E.'
    Funded By: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics . The Eating & Health module is also sponsored by the USDA's Economic Research Service and the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute.
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 11/22/2013
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Questionnaire Data, 1999-2000:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 1999-2000 wave, the NHANES includes more than 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Not all files from the 1999-2000 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e., some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods File)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Questionnaire: Analgesics Pain Relievers
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 10/3/2016
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Laboratory Data, 1999-2000:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 1999-2000 wave, the NHANES includes more than 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Not all files from the 1999-2000 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e., some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods File)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Questionnaire: Analgesics Pain Relievers
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 10/3/2016
  • National Health Interview Survey, Adults, 2002:
    "The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a multi-purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian, noninstitutionalized, household population in the United States. The NHIS has been conducted continuously since its beginning in 1957." (NHIS Survey Description, Public Use Data Release, December 2003).
    Funded By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine , National Institutes of Health
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 8/19/2016
  • National Survey of Family Growth - (2011-2013) Pregnancy File:
    The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration with several other federal agencies (see Acknowledgements). Since the NSFG began in 1973, there have been eight data release files. The purpose of the survey is to produce national estimates of:

    -Factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility;
    -The medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth;
    -Factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption;
    -Adoption and caring for nonbioogical children
    -Father involvement behaviors, and
    -Men's and women's attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage.

    The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these topics. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other research and policy organizations to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies on the topics listed above.

    For the 2011-2013 NSFG, statistical design, interviewing, and data processing have been conducted by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research (ISR), under a contract with the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), in collaboration with the NCHS NSFG. William Mosher served as Project Officer and Joyce Abma as Alternate Project Officer for the 2011-2013 data collection.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 2/11/2019
  • Complementary and Alternative Medical (CAM) and Spirituality, Religiosity Survey:
    This survey contains measures for examining the effect of spirituality on health. Topics for spirituality and religiosity measures include: spiritual and meditative practice, spiritual experiences, values, forgiveness, private religious practice, religious and spiritual coping, religious support, religious and spiritual history, organized religious practice and preference, meaning. Topics for health measures include: frequency and positivity of exceptional experiences, mindfulness, and current problems. Other data include basic demographic characteristics.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 11/29/2011
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Laboratory Data, 2005-2006:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2005-2006 wave, the NHANES includes over 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Not all files from the 2005-2006 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e., some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods -- First Day)
    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods -- Second Day)
    Examination: Food Frequency Questionnaire -- DietCalc Output
    Examination: Physical Activity Monitor
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS).
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 8/19/2016
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Examination Data, 1999-2000:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 1999-2000 wave, the NHANES includes more than 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 1999-2000 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Not all files from the 1999-2000 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e. some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods File)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Questionnaire: Analgesics Pain Relievers
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 10/3/2016
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Examination Data, 2001-2002:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2001-2002 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups.

    In the 2001-2002 wave, the NHANES includes more than 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2001-2002 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2001-2002 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2001-2002 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Not all files from the 2001-2002 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e. some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods File)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Questionnaire: Analgesics Pain Relievers
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 7/31/2017
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Laboratory Data, 2001-2002:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements, which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2001-2002 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups.

    In the 2001-2002 wave, the NHANES includes more than 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2001-2002 (the base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations)

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2001-2002 (the base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories)

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2001-2002 (the base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Not all files from the 2001-2002 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e. some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods File)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Questionnaire: Analgesics Pain Relievers
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 7/31/2017
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Questionnaire Data, 2001-2002:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2001-2002 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups.

    In the 2001-2002 wave, the NHANES includes more than 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2001-2002 (the base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2001-2002 (the base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2001-2002 (the base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires).

    Not all files from the 2001-2002 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e. some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods File)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Examination: Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXX)
    Questionnaire: Analgesics Pain Relievers
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 7/31/2017
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2004:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2004 NASIS asks questions about outdoor and recreational activities, environmental conservation issues, household composition, job situation, civic attitudes and behavior, mental health and attitudes toward criminal justice.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/3/2018
  • Culturally Adapted Spiritually Oriented Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Child Survivors of Restavek:
    Restavek is a form of modern-day slavery that is estimated to affect 300,000 (i.e., approximately 1 in 10) children in Haiti. It typically involves a child from a poor rural family being sent to work as an indentured domestic servant for an affluent urban family. Restavek children experience a high rate of trauma, as well as other mental health concerns.The present study explored the effectiveness of a culturally adapted form of Spiritually Oriented Trauma-Focused Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy (SO-TF-CBT), a treatment model for assessing and treating religious and spiritual issues within the standard TF-CBT protocol (an evidence-based treatment for childhood trauma). This study involved 20 control participants and 38 treatment participants assigned to a 12-session protocol. The primary research question of the present study is whether a culturally adapted SO-TFCBT intervention, relative to a control, would lead to a reduction in posttraumatic stress symptoms among child survivors of Restavek in Haiti. Because SO-TF-CBT also targets potential religious and spiritual issues related to trauma, a secondary research question examined the effects of this intervention on participants’ tendencies to experience spiritual struggles. In the interests of better addressing the mental health treatment gap among this population in Haiti, our study also investigated, as a secondary goal, whether this treatment could be effectively delivered by people with less formal mental health training. Specifically, we examined three distinct delivery methods: (a) community- based lay counselors, (b) NGO staff volunteers, and (c) undergraduate students from a local university.
    Funded By: This survey is part of a larger grant from the John Templeton Foundation entitled "Earth as a School: Finding Meaning, Relating to God, and Experiencing Growth After a Natural Disaster" (#44040) .
    Collected: 2015, Uploaded 10/29/2018
  • Marital Instability Over the Life Course [United States]: A Five-Wave Panel Study, 1980, 1983, 1988, 1992-1994, 1997:
    To examine the causes of marital instability throughout the life course, five waves of data were collected between 1980 and 1997 from married individuals who were between the ages of 18 and 55 in 1980. Information collected in 1980 (Wave I) focused on the effects of wives' participation in the labor force on marriage and marital instability. Measures predicting marital instability and divorce and assessing marital quality were developed. Variables include information on earnings, commitment to work, hours worked, and occupational status. The focus of Wave II, conducted in 1983, was to link changes in factors such as economic resources, wife's employment, presence of children, marital satisfaction, life goals, and health to actions intended to dissolve a marriage, such as divorce and permanent separation. Information on adjustment to marital dissolution, relationship with in-laws, size of home, parents' employment, use of free time, club membership, child-care arrangements, and responsibility for chores was gathered. Wave III, collected in 1988, further examined the impact of changes in employment, economics, and health on marital relationships. Questions were asked about divorce and remarriage, investment of energy and resource use in the care of aging parents and dependent offspring, asset value, awareness of aging, mental health issues, and history of disease. In 1992, a fourth wave of data was collected to look at changes in employment, economics, and health. Questions were asked about retirement issues, family structure, and the impact of caring for aging parents while at the same time caring for dependent offspring. Data were also collected in 1992 and 1994 from adult offspring who were living in the household in 1980 and had reached age 19 by 1992, thus providing parallel measures with their parents regarding the quality of parent-child relationships, attitudes, and support along with exploring the impact of childhood experiences on the transition to adult life. In 1997, the fifth wave was collected and interviews were conducted with a second sample of adult offspring (N=202) along with second interviews of offspring selected in 1992 (N=606). Wave 5 also examines the relationship between marital quality and stability and how it relates to changes in marital quality later in life. Among the variables included in all five waves are age, sex, educational attainment, marital status and history, attitude toward divorce, number of children, religious affiliation, and income level.
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1980, Uploaded 5/21/2010
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1997:
    The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 6, 1997, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 8/19/2016
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1994:
    "The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 5, 1994, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 2/23/2018
  • Social Capital Community Survey, 2006:
    The 2006 Social Capital Community Survey was undertaken by the Saguaro Seminar at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University. The SCCS consisted of a national sample and targeted samples in 22 American communities. The SCCS is a follow-up to the 2000 Social Capital Community Benchmark Survey , conducted nationally and in 41 American communities.

    Social capital is the societal analogue of physical or economic capital -- the value inherent in friendship networks and other associations that individuals and groups can draw upon to achieve private or collective objectives. In recent years, the concept has received increasing attention as accumulating evidence demonstrates the independent relationship between social capital and a wide range of desirable outcomes: economic success, improved school performance, decreased crime, higher levels of voting and better health. Within communities, recent research supports the belief that social capital fosters norms of social trust and reciprocity, facilitating communal goals. The concept's theoretical richness and practical significance is becoming increasingly well-documented.

    For more information, visit the Saguaro Seminar website.
    Funded By: Surdna Foundation , Audrey and Bernard Rapoport Foundation, Kansas Health Institute , Community Foundation for Greater Greensboro , Duluth Area Foundation, Gulf Coast Community Foundation of Venice , Kalamazoo Foundation , Maine Community Foundation , New Hampshire Charitable Foundation , San Diego Foundation , Winston-Salem Foundation
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 10/22/2010
  • National Health Interview Survey, Families, 2002:
    "The National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) is a multi-purpose health survey conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and is the principal source of information on the health of the civilian, noninstitutionalized, household population in the United States. The NHIS has been conducted continuously since its beginning in 1957." (NHIS Survey Description, Public Use Data Release, December 2003).
    Funded By: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine , National Institutes of Health
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 8/19/2016
  • National Survey of Family Growth - (2011-2013) Female Respondent File:
    The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration with several other federal agencies (see Acknowledgements). Since the NSFG began in 1973, there have been eight data release files. The purpose of the survey is to produce national estimates of:

    - Factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility;
    - The medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth;
    - Factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption;
    - Adoption and caring for nonbiological children
    - Father involvement behaviors, and
    - Men's and women's attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage.

    The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these topics. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other research and policy organizations to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies on the topics listed above.

    For the 2011-2013 NSFG, statistical design, interviewing, and data processing have been conducted by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research (ISR), under a contract with the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), in collaboration with the NCHS NSFG. William Mosher served as Project Officer and Joyce Abma as Alternate Project Officer for the 2011-2013 data collection.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 2/11/2019
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1994:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; race relations; religion; the role of congregations in society; morality; cultural issues; gender roles; health and exercise; cultural and leisure activities.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 9/7/2012
  • National Survey of Family Growth - (2011-2013) Male Respondent File:
    The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration with several other federal agencies (see Acknowledgements). Since the NSFG began in 1973, there have been eight data release files. The purpose of the survey is to produce national estimates of:

    -Factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility;
    -The medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth;
    -Factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption;
    -Adoption and caring for nonbioogical children
    -Father involvement behaviors, and
    -Men's and women's attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage.

    The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these topics. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other research and policy organizations to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies on the topics listed above.

    For the 2011-2013 NSFG, statistical design, interviewing, and data processing have been conducted by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research (ISR), under a contract with the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), in collaboration with the NCHS NSFG. William Mosher served as Project Officer and Joyce Abma as Alternate Project Officer for the 2011-2013 data collection.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 2/11/2019
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Grand Sample Weights, Wave II:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Included here are weights to remove any differences between the composition of the sample and the estimated composition of the population. See the attached codebook for information regarding how these weights were calculated.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 1/8/2016
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Examination Data, 2003-2004:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic NHANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2003-2004 wave, the NHANES includes more than 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 11/14/2016
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Laboratory Data, 2003-2004:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic NHANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2003-2004 wave, the NHANES includes more than 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 11/14/2016
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Questionnaire Data, 2003-2004:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2003-2004 wave, the NHANES includes over 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2003-2004 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES web site.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 11/14/2016
  • National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic and Examination Data, 2005-2006:
    The National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) is a program of studies designed to assess the health and nutritional status of adults and children in the United States. The NHANES combines personal interviews and physical examinations, which focus on different population groups or health topics. These surveys have been conducted by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) on a periodic basis from 1971 to 1994. In 1999, the NHANES became a continuous program with a changing focus on a variety of health and nutrition measurements which were designed to meet current and emerging concerns. The sample for the survey is selected to represent the U.S. population of all ages. Many of the NHANES 2007-2008 questions also were asked in NHANES II 1976-1980, Hispanic HANES 1982-1984, NHANES III 1988-1994, and NHANES 1999-2006. New questions were added to the survey based on recommendations from survey collaborators, NCHS staff, and other interagency work groups. Estimates for previously undiagnosed conditions, as well as those known to and reported by survey respondents, are produced through the survey.

    In the 2005-2006 wave, the NHANES includes over 100 datasets. Most have been combined into three datasets for convenience. Each starts with the Demographic dataset and includes datasets of a specific type.

    1. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Examination Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical examinations).

    2. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Laboratory Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from medical laboratories).

    3. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), Demographic & Questionnaire Data, 2005-2006 (The base of the Demographic dataset + all data from questionnaires)

    Not all files from the 2005-2006 wave are included. This is for two reasons, both of which related to the merging variable (SEQN). For a subset of the files, SEQN is not a unique identifier for cases (i.e., some respondents have multiple cases) or SEQN is not in the file at all. The following datasets from this wave of the NHANES are not included in these three files and can be found individually from the NHANES website at the CDC:

    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods -- First Day)
    Examination: Dietary Interview (Individual Foods -- Second Day)
    Examination: Food Frequency Questionnaire -- DietCalc Output
    Examination: Physical Activity Monitor
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Ingredient Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Blend
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Supplement Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Drug Information
    Questionnaire: Dietary Supplement Use -- Participants Use of Supplement
    Questionnaire: Physical Activity Individual Activity File
    Questionnaire: Prescription Medications

    Variable SEQN is included for merging files within the waves. All data files should be sorted by SEQN.

    Additional details of the design and content of each survey are available at the NHANES website .
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 8/19/2016
  • Survey of Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) Pastors, 2008:
    The 2008 Survey of Pastors, conducted by the Research Services of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) , represents findings from a survey completed by 725 pastors of the Presbyterian church. The survey deals with matters such as clergy compensation, housing, the cost of education of children, the effectiveness of ministry support groups, the frequency and effectiveness of sabbaticals, health and well-being, and other topics.

    "The 2008 Survey of Presbyterian Pastors reveals that most pastors consider their present compensation package to be fair and reasonable given the circumstances of the congregation. One in six live in a manse. Two in three report making changes to improve their health in the previous year. Learn more about Presbyterian pastors from this survey." (2008 Survey of Pastors).
    Funded By: Board of Pensions of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 2/21/2011
  • Hurricane Katrina - Spiritual, Psychological and Mental Health Response:
    Collected at the University of Southern Mississippi within four months following Hurricane Katrina, this data set contains basic demographic data and three psychological scales — Conservation of Resources (actual loss and threat of loss), Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and Brief RCOPE. These data were collected under the auspices of the Humanitarian Disaster Institute at Wheaton College .
    Funded By: This survey is part of a larger grant from the John Templeton Foundation entitled "Earth as a School: Finding Meaning, Relating to God, and Experiencing Growth After a Natural Disaster" (#44040) .
    Collected: 1005, Uploaded 10/29/2018
  • Survey of Religious, Social Service and Community Organizations in Metropolitan Chicago, 1996:
    This survey was conducted to supplement the research on congregations being conducted by the Religion in Urban America Program. The primary concern was to learn whether and to what extent religious, social service and community organizations related to and extended the work of churches. That is, whether they bridged geographic and/or social boundaries and whether there was a difference between religious and secular organizations with respect to the bridging function.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. Park Ridge Center of Health, Faith, and Ethics
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 7/20/1999
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1971:
    The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their sixties), middle-aged parents (then in their early forties), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file only contains the first wave in 1971.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1971, Uploaded 3/16/2015
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 2000:
    The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 7, 2000, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 9/21/2015
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1988:
    "The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 3, 1988, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 4/9/2018
  • National Survey of Family Growth - Wave 5 (1995) Pregnancy File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews conducted in the homes of a national sample of women 15-44 years of age in the civilian, non-institutionalized population of the United States. The main purpose of the survey was to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals.

    The pregnancy file uses each pregnancy mentioned by a respondent as the unit of analysis and contains detailed pregnancy histories and wantedness of pregnancies, as well as selected respondent characteristics. The recodes were created to simpify analyses, and are provided for key variables in virtually every topic.

    Using the common identification number (CASEID), and the pregnancy number (PREGORDR), the interval and respondent files can be merged to produce a file containing both respondent information and pregnancy information. The resulting file can be either respondent-based (up to 10,847 records) or interval-based (up to 21,332 records).
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 5/1/2009
  • National Survey of Family Growth - Wave 7 (2006-2008) Pregnancy File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews completed with 4,524 respondents. The main purpose of the NSFG surveys have been to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals. Cycle 7 utilized continuous interviewing, in which interviewers gather data on a year round basis, with data exported every few years. This is the first data export from cycle 7.

    The pregnancy file uses each pregnancy mentioned by a respondent as the unit of analysis and contains detailed pregnancy histories and wantedness of pregnancies, as well as selected respondent characteristics.

    Using the common identification number (CASEID), and the pregnancy number (PREGORDR), the interval and respondent files can be merged to produce a file containing both respondent information and pregnancy information. The resulting file can be either respondent-based (up to 4,524 records) or interval-based (up to 12,221 records). The ARDA used the interval-based format for the data set.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 11/1/2011
  • National Survey of Family Growth - (2006-2010) Pregnancy File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews completed with 22,682 respondents. The main purpose of the NSFG surveys have been to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals. The 2006-2010 NSFG survey represents a shift from periodic surveys to continues interviewing, with interviews being conducted 48 weeks of every year for 4 years. This public use data file contains all interviews conducted from June 2006-June 2010.

    The pregnancy file uses each pregnancy mentioned by a respondent as the unit of analysis and contains detailed pregnancy histories and wantedness of pregnancies, as well as selected respondent characteristics.

    Using the common identification number (CASEID), and the pregnancy number (PREGORDR), the interval and respondent files can be merged to produce a file containing both respondent information and pregnancy information. The resulting file can be either respondent-based or interval-based. The ARDA used the interval-based format for the data set.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/11/2019
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1988:
    This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations.
    Funded By: Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln ; the Legislative Research Council; and Helen Moore, Hugh Whitt, and Suzanne Ortega of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 12/3/2018
  • Religion and Public Life Survey, 2004:
    This survey investigates respondents' opinions concerning a variety of recent issues covered by news media, such as anticipated votes in the 2004 presidential election, foreign policy attitudes, and especially the personal attributes and actions of John Kerry and President George W. Bush. The survey also asks the extent to which respondents have followed recent topics in news media, including, but not limited to: Iraq, terrorism, the Democratic convention, the price of gasoline, the "code orange" alert, abortion, the federal budget deficit, energy, health care, stem cell research, education, the environment, respect for America, and the 9-11 Commission.

    The Religion and Public Life Survey, 2004, sponsored by the Pew Research Center for the People and the Press (PRC), obtained telephone interviews with a nationally representative sample of 1,512 adults living in continental United States telephone households. The interviews were conducted in English by Princeton Data Source, LLC from August 5 to August 10, 2004. Statistical results are weighted to correct known demographic discrepancies. The margin of sampling error for the complete set of weighted data is +/-3%. Details on the design, execution and analysis of the survey are discussed below. Note: This file was previously listed on the ARDA as the News Interest Index, August 2004.
    Funded By: The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 8/31/2007
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2095 Piazza, Terrorism Suspect Religious Identity and Support for Controversial Practices:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    The following study executes a survey experiment involving four treatment vignettes and one control vignette and 17 survey questions administered to 1,135 respondents. Respondents are randomly assigned to one of the five treatments which depict a short AP newswire blurb describing an arrest of two terrorist suspects in suburban Chicago. The treatments are identical to one another except they vary the names of the suspects (stereotypical Arabic/Muslim vs. Anglo-American) and the names of the terrorist movement the suspects are alleged to be members of (radical Islamists vs. right-wing American extremist). The control vignette omits any identification of the suspect names or groups. All respondents are then asked 13 questions rating their support for / approval of controversial interrogation and detention practices (10 interrogation practices, including the use of physical abuse of suspects, and three detention practices, including indefinite detention of suspects) that have been used by U.S. counterterrorism officials since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 1/16/2015
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2028 Johns, Civilian Casualties and Support for War:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This experiment examines how the social/political conditions of a target country and the number of estimated casualties affect the support for attacking the target country. This project includes two vignette-based survey experiments. Each involves random assignment to a relatively large number of conditions (i.e., different vignettes): 12 in the case of Experiment 1 and 16 in the case of Experiment 2:

    Experiment 1-- A. Target state is hypothetical. B. Variables manipulated: political nature of target state (democracy or dictatorship); dominant faith of target state (Islamic or Christian); and anticipated civilian death toll (no mention or 100 or 3,000). C. Number of total conditions: 12.

    Experiment 2 -- A. Target state is Iran. B. Variables manipulated: anticipated civilian death toll (50 or 500 or 5,000 or 50,000); framing of civilian casualties ('civilian casualties' or 'innocent Iranians dying, many of them women and children'); and anticipated success (delay nuclear program in Iran by a year or delay by 10 years). C. Number of total conditions: 16.

    The order of the two experiments is randomized across respondents (e.g., half doing Experiment 1 first and half doing Experiment 2 first).
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/13/2015
  • National Survey of Family Growth - (2006-2010) Male Respondent File:
    The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration with several other federal agencies (see Acknowledgements). The NSFG has been conducted seven times since 1973. The purpose of the survey is to produce national estimates of:

    -Factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility;
    -The medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth;
    -Factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption;
    -Adoption and caring for nonbiological children
    -Father involvement behaviors, and
    -Men's and women's attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage.

    The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these topics. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other research and policy organizations to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies on the topics listed above.

    For the 2006-2010 NSFG, statistical design, interviewing, and data processing have been conducted by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research (ISR), under a contract with the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), in collaboration with the NCHS NSFG team led by William Mosher (Project Officer).

    The 2006-2010 NSFG survey represents a shift from periodic surveys to continuous interviewing, with interviews being conducted 48 weeks of every year for four years. This public use data file contains all interviews conducted from June 2006-June 2010. In-person interviews were conducted with 12,279 women 15-44 years of age and 10,403 men 15-44 years of age for a total sample size of 22,682.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/11/2019
  • National Survey of Family Growth - (2006-2010) Female Respondent File:
    The National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) is designed and administered by the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), an agency of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, in collaboration with several other federal agencies (see Acknowledgements). The NSFG has been conducted seven times since 1973. The purpose of the survey is to produce national estimates of:

    -Factors affecting pregnancy, including sexual activity, contraceptive use, and infertility;
    -The medical care associated with contraception, infertility, and childbirth;
    -Factors affecting marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and adoption;
    -Adoption and caring for nonbiological children
    -Father involvement behaviors, and
    -Men's and women's attitudes about sex, childbearing, and marriage.

    The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these topics. The survey results are used by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and other research and policy organizations to plan health services and health education programs, and to do statistical studies on the topics listed above.

    For the 2006-2010 NSFG, statistical design, interviewing, and data processing have been conducted by the University of Michigan's Institute for Social Research (ISR), under a contract with the National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), in collaboration with the NCHS NSFG team led by William Mosher (Project Officer).

    The 2006-2010 NSFG survey represents a shift from periodic surveys to continuous interviewing, with interviews being conducted 48 weeks of every year for four years. This public use data file contains all interviews conducted from June 2006-June 2010. In-person interviews were conducted with 12,279 women 15-44 years of age and 10,403 men 15-44 years of age for a total sample size of 22,682.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/11/2019
  • National Survey of Family Growth - Wave 7 (2006-2008) Male Respondent File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews completed with 4,524 respondents. The main purpose of the NSFG surveys have been to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals. Cycle 7 utilized continuous interviewing, in which interviewers gather data on a year round basis, with data exported every few years. This is the first data export from cycle 7.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 11/1/2011
  • National Survey of Family Growth - Wave 7 (2006-2008) Female Respondent File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews completed with 4,524 respondents. The main purpose of the NSFG surveys have been to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals. Cycle 7 utilized continuous interviewing, in which interviewers gather data on a year round basis, with data exported every few years. This is the first data export from cycle 7.
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 11/1/2011
  • Survey of Texas Adults, 2004:
    This data set is aimed at learning more about the lives of Texas adults. Specifically, the data set contains information on seven major aspects of Texans' lives: civic engagement and attitudes; volunteering; organizational memberships and giving behaviors; personality; physical and mental health; health behaviors; religious activities and beliefs. The dataset also includes information about respondents' demographic characteristics.
    Funded By: RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service The College of Liberal Arts , The University of Texas at Austin
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 9/6/2013
  • From Belief To Commitment: the Community Service Activities and Finances of Religious Congregations in the United States, 1992:
    The 1993 Edition "From Belief to Commitment" offers the following description of the project summary.

    In 1992, INDEPENDENT SECTOR conducted a national survey of the activities and finances of religious congregations in order to provide information about religious organizations as part of a larger national survey of the activities and finances of private, nonprofit, charitable organizations in the United States. This survey was also designed to update a larger survey of the activities and finances of congregations conducted in 1987. The purpose of these surveys is to provide information about an important set of institutions and their impact on the quality of life in their communities and on individual giving and volunteering more generally. . . Specific objectives of the survey were to find answers to the following questions:
    1. What are the size and membership composition of congregations?
    2. Where are the congregations located by region of the country and by urban, suburban, or rural areas?
    3. What are the congregations' programs in religion, education, health, human services, international activities, community development, civil rights, arts and culture, and the environment?
    4. What are the total revenues of the congregations, and what proportions of these revenues come from individual giving or other sources of funds?
    5. What are the expenditures of congregations? How much money do they spend on operations and programs, and how much do they use for other purposes?
    6. How many people from the congregation volunteer to perform various activities, and how many hours per month do they volunteer?
    7. How many programs, such as services to the elderly, do congregations operate directly, and how many programs do they support indirectly through contributions or through the voluntary service of members of the congregation?

    With these questions we hoped to gain an initial understanding of the range of activities of congregations and their participation in the larger community. We also wanted to estimate nationally the size, scope, source and purpose of revenues and expenditures of congregations, and the ways these activities and expenditures relate to total philanthropy in the United States (p. xi-xii).
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc.
    Collected: 1992, Uploaded 2/23/1998
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2010 - Health, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2010 survey focuses on personal health, health insurance, and health-related services provided by the congregations. This dataset contains data from all sampled constituency groups.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 5/19/2014
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2010 - Health, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2010 survey focuses on personal health, health insurance, and health-related services provided by the congregations. This dataset contains data from clergy of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). Pastors and specialized clergy constitute this sample.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 5/19/2014
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2010 - Health, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2010 survey focuses on personal health, health insurance, and health-related services provided by the congregations. This dataset contains data from elders of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 5/19/2014
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2010 - Health, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The May 2010 survey focuses on personal health, health insurance, and health-related services provided by the congregations. This dataset contains data from members of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 5/19/2014
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2008:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2008 NASIS asks questions about driving behavior, cell phone usage, disaster response, health, immigration, and religion.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies, private non-profit agencies, and other university departments
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 11/27/2017
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2012:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2011 NASIS asks questions about the Nebraska Department of Roads, trees and forests, water planning, wind energy, climate change, community trust, impressions about UNL, government policies, female sex offenders, personal finances, and mental health.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and private research organizations
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 2/23/2018
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2005:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2005 NASIS asks questions about outdoor activities, employment, nursing homes, discrimination, and religion.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies, private non-profit agencies, and university departments
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 10/29/2018
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2007:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2007 NASIS asks questions about crime, fishing, healthcare, nursing homes, family services, and religion.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 11/27/2017
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1985:
    "The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 2, 1985, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations. Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1985, Uploaded 9/7/2018
  • National Survey of Family Growth - Wave 5 (1995) Respondent File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews conducted in the homes of a national sample of women 15-44 years of age in the civilian, noninstitutionalized population of the United States. The main purpose of the survey was to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals.

    The respondent file uses each respondent as the unit of analysis and contains detailed fertility and contraceptive, as well as extensive respondent demographics and personal histories. The recodes were created to simpify analyses, and are provided for key variables in virtually every topic.

    Using the common identification number (CASEID), and the pregnancy number (PREGORDR), the interval and respondent files can be merged to produce a file containing both respondent information and pregnancy information. The resulting file can be either respondent-based (up to 10,847 records) or interval-based (up to 21,332 records).
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 7/17/2009
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2014:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2014 NASIS asks questions about The Nebraska Department of Natural Resources, underage drinking, safety, vaccinations, the Affordable Care Act, and plant management in Nebraska.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2014, Uploaded 6/5/2017
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2013:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2013 NASIS asks questions about the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources, wind energy and wildlife, recycling, plant management in Nebraska, and politics and policies.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 6/5/2017
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2010:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2010 NASIS asks questions about current issues, nursing homes and assisted living facilities, personal finances, survey participation, as well as general demographic and household information.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 1/19/2018
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2011:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2011 NASIS asks questions about water issues, life processes, crime and the criminal justice system, media and television, vacation and travel, physical and social environment, gender and parenthood, personal feelings, and household finances.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 1/19/2018
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2003:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2003 NASIS asks questions about outdoor and recreational activities, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, household composition, job situation, the care in nursing homes/assisted living facilities, voting behavior, and the Nebraska Department of Roads.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 9/7/2018
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2015:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2015 NASIS asks questions about crime, water quality, 4_H, youth and community, childcare, and gay and lesbian issues.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2015, Uploaded 6/5/2017
  • Survey of Congregations in Metropolitan Chicago, 1994:
    The Religion in Urban America Program (RUAP) conducts research in metropolitan Chicago concerning the diverse ways religious organizations of all faiths serve urban people and address urban issues. The heart of the study is an empirical examination of religious and religiously affiliated organizations in metropolitan Chicago. We have conducted case studies of some 75 congregations and numerous other organizations--denominational, ecumenical, and interfaith agencies, religiously based community organizations, and special-purpose groups. Using ethnography as the principal research method, which includes on-site observations and interviews, we attempt to understand and interpret each organization on its own terms and with attention to those features and purposes considered most important by its leaders and constituencies. The Survey of Congregations in Metropolitan Chicago was conducted for the sole purpose of providing information to assist us in selecting congregations to serve as ethnographic case studies.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. Park Ridge Center of Health, Faith, and Ethics
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 7/20/1999
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2042 Creighton, Perceptions of Islam, Migration, and Citizenship in the United States:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This list experiment tests whether views toward immigrants depend on whether the immigrant group shares the same religion as the respondent. Since traditional survey methods may be more prone to social desirability bias, an experimental design is necessary. In this study, respondents are divided between a control group and, in this case, two treatment groups. The control group is just asked three questions unrelated to immigration. The first treatment group is asked the original three questions, but with an additional question pertaining to Muslim immigrants. The second treatment group is asked the original three questions, but with an additional question pertaining to Christian immigrants. In its most basic incarnation, the comparison of the mean of the responses to the control list with the mean of the responses to each of the treatments offers an estimate of the proportion opposed to the additional list item.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/13/2015
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2047 Thornton, Understanding the Role of Religious Appeals in Political Communication:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    The following 2X2 experiment examines the concept of religious priming as well as the potential for political awareness to moderate discernible priming effects. The study follows a 2 (Religious Cues: Present, Absent) x 2 (Prior Information: Present, Absent) between subjects factorial design, with pretest and posttest questions. Religious cues are manipulated by providing respondents with a political advertisement including or excluding religious appeals. The second factor manipulates awareness, specifically how much information participants know about the political candidate's policy preferences. As such, participants will be randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions (Information-Present, Cue-Present; Information-Present, Cue-Absent; Information-Absent, Cue-Present; Information-Absent, Cue-Absent). The information condition is simply whether one receives a one page pdf bio of the candidate; the religious cue condition is whether one receives a political ad with or without religious cues.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 1/16/2015
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS73 Djupe, The Political Impact of Message Attributes from Religious Elites:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    The study focuses on the affect religious attributes may have on messages about global warming. Respondents will receive information about 1) the religious affiliation of a public official and 2) the way he made his decision to take a stance on global warming. This is a 2x2 between subject design, where the first factor is the source cue (Present/Absent) and the second factor is the decision process (Present/Absent). In total, there are four conditions and respondents are assigned with equal probabilities.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 9/19/2014
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS16 Glazier, Providential Religious Beliefs and U.S. Foreign Policy:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This study uses a 2X3 experimental study design to examine how religious frames of natural disasters and political crises may influence the support for government intervention. There are a total of six experimental conditions. The first three experimental conditions deal with a hypothetical foreign policy speech regarding government intervention in a foreign natural disaster. One condition is unframed, another condition frames it as a responsibility to international agreement, and the last condition frames the issue as a religious duty as a blessed nation. Another set of three conditions deal with a hypothetical foreign policy speech regarding government intervention in a foreign political crisis. One condition is unframed, another condition frames it as a responsibility to international agreement, and the last condition frames the issue as a religious duty as a blessed nation. Through this experiment, we can examine the effects of civil religion.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 9/19/2014
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2104 Singer, The Effect of Question Wording on Preferences for Genetic Testing and Abortion:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This question-wording experiment was designed to see whether using the term "fetus" rather than "baby" to ask questions would alter public preferences about prenatal testing for genetic defects and for abortion if a test revealed such defects. From 1990 through 2010, the GSS questions about prenatal testing and abortion were framed in terms of "baby" - for example: "Today, tests are being developed that make it possible to detect serious genetic defects before a baby is born." After the 2010 results were released, some researchers questioned whether the answers might have been different had the questions been framed in terms of "fetus" rather than "baby" because the word "fetus" may carry a more abstract, impersonal connotation than "baby" and might therefore lead to more frequent expressions of preferences for prenatal testing and abortion. To resolve this issue and provide guidance for future administrations of these questions in the GSS, the investigators designed a question-wording experiment fielded by TESS.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 1/16/2015
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS101 Lee, Cultural Affinities, Regime Type, and Foreign Policy Opinion Formation:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This experiment explores the role of region-specific cultural biases on individual citizens' perceptions of security threats and seeks to disentangle this effect from the impact of knowledge of regime type. In two different scenarios, the type of government of a given country (democratic/non-democratic) and the religion of a given group (Christianity/Islam/Hinduism) are rotated for each experimental condition (six total conditions, two different scenarios). Respondent's assignment to versions of the two scenarios is independent. In other words, there are two separate randomizations to one of six conditions, one for each scenario. The first scenario (Scenario A) deals with an international terrorist organization and the second scenario (Scenario B) deals with a foreign country developing nuclear weapons.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 9/19/2014
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1994:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; race relations; religion; the role of congregations in society; morality; cultural issues; gender roles; health and exercise; cultural and leisure activities.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 9/7/2012
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, January 2007 - Spirituality and Health, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The January 2007 survey focuses on spirituality and health.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 4/25/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, January 2007 - Spirituality and Health, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The January 2007 survey focuses on spirituality and health.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 4/25/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, January 2007 - Spirituality and Health, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The January 2007 survey focuses on spirituality and health.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 4/25/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, January 2007 - Spirituality and Health, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The January 2007 survey focuses on spirituality and health.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 4/25/2011
  • PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, June 2012:
    The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward topics discussed in the country today. Questions explored attitudes toward same-sex marriage, immigration policies, health care laws, and whether certain policies should be decided at the national or state level.
    Funded By: Public Religion Research Institute
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 5/23/2016
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2008 - Spirituality and Health, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2008 survey focuses on spirituality and health and repeats many of the same questions that were asked on the January 2007 survey on the same topic.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 3/19/2012
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2008 - Spirituality and Health, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2008 survey focuses on spirituality and health and repeats many of the same questions that were asked on the January 2007 survey on the same topic.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 3/19/2012
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2008 - Spirituality and Health, Members and Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2008 survey focuses on spirituality and health and repeats many of the same questions that were asked on the January 2007 survey on the same topic.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 3/19/2012
  • National Survey of Family Growth - Wave 6 (2002) Male Respondent File:
    These surveys were based on personal interviews completed with 12,571 respondents 15-44 years of age and comprising 7,643 females and 4,928 males. The main purpose of the NSFG surveys has been to provide reliable national data on marriage, divorce, contraception, infertility, and the health of women and infants in the United States. The survey contains key religion variables that may relate to these goals. Cycle 6 expands upon this mission by interviewing male respondents for the first time.

    The female respondent file uses each female respondent as the unit of analysis and contains detailed fertility histories, social characteristics, and personal histories of each respondent (including religion variables), as well as selected characteristics of each respondent's pregnancy history. The recodes were created to simpify analyses, and are provided for key variables in virtually every topic.

    Using the common identification number (CASEID), and the pregnancy number (PREGORDR), the interval and respondent files can be merged to produce a file containing both respondent information and pregnancy information. The resulting file can be either respondent-based (up to 12,571 records) or interval-based (up to 13,593 records).
    Funded By: National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS)
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 7/17/2009
  • Philanthropy Panel Study, 2005:
    The Philanthropy Panel Study is the Philanthropy Module of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). The 2005 Panel contains data on the charitable giving, volunteering, and religious service attendance of more than 8,000 American families. The charitable giving data describe the giving done by the family unit as a whole. The volunteering and attendance data are separately available for both "Heads" and "Wives" (PSID terminology) in married couples and cohabiting families. The Panel also contains a question about who in married couples makes decisions about charitable giving.

    The charitable giving data include religious giving and the volunteering data include religious volunteering. The religious giving and volunteering data-along with the religious attendance and religious affiliation data-make the Panel well-suited for the study of important religious behaviors within the PSID's rich context of families' economic, social, health, and demographic circumstances.
    Funded By: Atlantic Philanthropies Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 1/16/2015
  • Philanthropy Panel Study, 2003:
    The Philanthropy Panel Study is the Philanthropy Module of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). The 2003 Panel contains data on the charitable giving, volunteering, and religious service attendance of 7,822 American families. The charitable giving data describe the giving done by the family unit as a whole. The volunteering and attendance data are separately available for both "Heads" and "Wives" (PSID terminology) in married couples and co-habiting families. The Panel also contains a question about who in married couples makes decisions about charitable giving.

    The charitable giving data include religious giving and the volunteering data include religious volunteering. The religious giving and volunteering data-along with the religious attendance and religious affiliation data-make the Panel well-suited for the study of important religious behaviors within the PSID's rich context of families' economic, social, health, and demographic circumstances.
    Funded By: Atlantic Philanthropies Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 3/21/2007
  • Philanthropy Panel Study, 2001:
    The Philanthropy Panel Study is the Philanthropy Module of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID). The 2001 Panel contains data on the charitable giving and volunteering of 7,406 American families. The charitable giving data describe the giving done by the family unit as a whole. The volunteering data are separately available for both "Heads" and "Wives" (PSID terminology) in married and cohabiting families.

    The charitable giving data include religious giving. The religious giving data-along with the religious affiliation data-make the Panel well-suited for the study of religious giving within the PSID's rich context of families' economic, social, health, and demographic circumstances. The 2001 Panel can be linked to the 2003 Panel providing the nation's only panel data on religious giving.
    Funded By: Atlantic Philanthropies Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 7/23/2007
  • Middletown Area Study, 1997:
    Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1998. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1997 study was designed to assess beliefs with regard to terminal illness, health care and health insurance, religious beliefs and practices, and attitudes regarding local police practices.
    Funded By: Dean's office of the College of Sciences and Humanities at Ball State University
    Collected: 1987, Uploaded 6/29/2000
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 1991- Health Issues:
    The Presbyterian Panel is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of Presbyterians-members, elders, pastors and clergy serving in specialized ministries. The major consideration guiding this research is a desire to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith and their social, economic and demographic characteristics, to provide a comprehensive profile of the denomination. The November 1991 survey focuses on health and lifestyle characteristics, as well as opinions on health insurance.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 1991, Uploaded 12/17/2001
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 1997 - Spirituality and Health, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include: members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 1997 survey focuses on perceptions of spirituality and health.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 1/20/2004
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 1997 - Spirituality and Health, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include: members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 1997 survey focuses on perceptions of spirituality and health.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 1/20/2004
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 1997 - Spirituality and Health, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include: members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The February 1997 survey focuses on perceptions of spirituality and health.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 1/20/2004
  • Middletown Area Study, 1992:
    Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1992 study was specifically designed to get an indication of voting patterns in relation to religious activities and other demographic variables. Topics of adoption, insurance and health care needs were also addressed.
    Funded By: Dean's office of the College of Sciences and Humanities at Ball State University
    Collected: 1992, Uploaded 9/26/1998
  • Subset of the 2010 General Social Survey for the "Religion and the Lifestyle of Young Adults" Learning Module:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS is designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This subset of the 2010 GSS includes respondents who are 18-30 years old and was created for users of the "Religion and the Lifestyle of Young Adults" learning module. This GSS subset features measures on religious tradition, educational attainment, employment, family life, health, and religious attendance.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 5/10/2013
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, 1991-1993, Merged:
    The Presbyterian Panel is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of Presbyterians - members, elders, pastors and clergy serving in specialized ministries. The major consideration guiding this research is a desire to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith and their social, economic and demographic characteristics, to provide a comprehensive profile of the denomination. This data file contains the background information (including social, economic, demographic and religious characteristics) for respondents, as well as 11 surveys conducted for the panel, including disabilities issues, criminal justice issues, Christian education, health issues, the environment and spirituality.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 1993, Uploaded 12/17/2001
[Viewing Matches 1-146]  (of 146 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Investigators/Researchers
[Viewing Matches 1-80]  (of 80 total matches in Investigators)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • DEPRESS from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Now I would like to ask you some questions about general health conditions. Has a doctor, nurse, or other health professional ever told you that you had: Depression?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    9) No answer

  • HLTHBEH from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Severe health problems may have many causes. How much do you agree or disagree with the following statements? People suffer from severe health problems: because they behaved in ways that damaged their health

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Strongly agree
    2) Agree
    3) Neither agree nor disagree
    4) Disagree
    5) Strongly disagree
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • INSTYPE from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    What kind of health insurance do you have?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Have no health insurance
    2) National, public health insurance (including coverage by public welfare) (A)
    3) Private insurance (B)
    4) Employer/union based insurance (C)
    5) National, public health insurance and private/complementary insurance (A+B)
    6) Public/national and employer/union based insurance (A+C)
    7) Employer/union based and private/complementary insurance (B+C)
    8) Employer/union based, private/complementary and national/public health insurance (A+B+C)
    9) Other
    10) Military
    98) Don't know
    99) No answer

  • HLTHSTRT from General Social Survey, 2016
    Would you say the respondent's health in general is Excellent, Good, Fair, or Poor?

    0) Not applicable
    1) Excellent
    2) Good
    3) Fair
    4) Poor

  • RHLTHEND from General Social Survey, 2016
    Would you say the respondent's health in general is Excellent, Good, Fair, or Poor?

    0) Not applicable
    1) Excellent
    2) Good
    3) Fair
    4) Poor
    9) No answer

  • HEALTH from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Would you say your own health, in general, is excellent, good, fair or poor?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Excellent
    2) Good
    3) Fair
    4) Poor
    8) Don't know

  • HEALTH from General Social Survey, 2016
    Would you say your own health, in general, is excellent, good, fair or poor?

    0) Not applicable
    1) Excellent
    2) Good
    3) Fair
    4) Poor
    9) No answer

  • HLTHDMG from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    People should have access to publicly funded health care even if they: behave in ways that damage their health?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Strongly agree
    2) Agree
    3) Neither agree nor disagree
    4) Disagree
    5) Strongly disagree
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • HYPERTEN from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Now I would like to ask you some questions about general health conditions. Has a doctor, nurse, or other health professional ever told you that you had: A. Hypertension or high blood pressure?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • ARTHRTIS from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Now I would like to ask you some questions about general health conditions. Has a doctor, nurse, or other health professional ever told you that you had: B. Arthritis or rheumatism?

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 7248 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
Concepts
  • Mental Health: "The psychologically healthy person is one who maintains close contact with reality" (Taylor and Brown 1988:193)...
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Concepts)
Measures
  • Mental Health: Questions covering issues pertaining to individual's mental health, views of mental health, attitudes toward those with mental health issues, medication, government intervention, etc.
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Measures)
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