Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Religion and new immigrants' labor market entry in Western Europe.
    Koenig, Matthias, Mieke Malipaard, and Ayse Guveli (2016)
    Ethnicities 16:2: 213-235.

    Associated Search Terms: Assimilation; Europe, western; Migrant; Work
  • Calembour de choses dans le vaudou italian: Corps-fétiche et principes d'inégalité devant les dieux.
    Taliani, Simona (2016)
    Social Compass 63:2: 163-180.

    Describes how human traffickers control young women through ritually turning them into fetishes who experience illness & near-death, & thereby lower in status for purposes of manipulation.

    Associated Search Terms: Sorcery; Fetish; Migrant; Stratification; Nigerian Italians
  • Church-based social support among Caribbean Blacks in the United States.
    Nguyen, Ann W., Robert Joseph Taylor, and Linda M. Chatters (2016)
    Review of Religious Research 58:3: 385-406.

    Analyzes 2001-03 survey data from the Caribbean Black subsample of a larger survey. Attendance & interaction with fellow congregants positively predicted social support, especially among women. Negative interactions were also present.

    Associated Search Terms: Migrant; Congregation; Social support; Caribbean Americans
  • Are movers more religious than stayers? Religiosity of European majority, Turks in Europe and Turkey.
    Guveli, Ayse (2015)
    Review of Religious Research 57:1: 43-62.

    Analyzes 2002-2010 European Social Survey data. For subjective & communal religiosity, 1st generation Turkish migrants to Europe are as religious or more so than Turks in Turkey; 2nd generation more religious yet. But 2nd generation prays individually less.

    Associated Search Terms: Generations; Islam, Europe; Islam, Turkey; Migrant; Turkey; Turkish Europeans
  • Gender, religious identity, and civic engagement among Arab Muslims in the United States.
    Read, Jen'nan Ghazal (2015)
    Sociology of Religion 76:1: 30-48.

    Analyzes 2001-04 telephone interview data from Muslim Arab Americans. Religiosity positively predicts civic engagement, especially for men.

    Associated Search Terms: Civic engagement; Migrant; Islam, U.S.A.; Arab Americans; Gender
  • Latino religious affiliation and ethnic identity.
    Calvillo, Jonathan E., and Stanley R. Bailey (2015)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 54:1: 57-78.

    analyzes 2006 telephone interview data from Latino Americans. Catholicism serves as a bridge to the ethnic homeland & positively predicts use of Spanish in the home while Protestantism reflects a break with the ethnicity & inversely predicts use of Spanish in the home.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, U.S.A.; Ethnic; Language; Migrant; Generations; Protestant, U.S.A.; Latino Americans
  • The diversity of Asian immigrants' partcipation in religious institutions in the United States.
    Min, Pyong Gap, and Sou Hyun Jang (2015)
    Socology of Religion 76:3: 253-274.

    Descriptive data from multiple sources, most significantly the 2112 Asian-American Survey. The intent is to supplement what has largely been studied in the past qualitatively.

    Associated Search Terms: Korean Americans; Asian Americans; Chinese Americans; Ethnic; Indian Americans; Migrant; Practice; Vietnamese Americans; Filipino Americans
  • My Soul Is in Haiti. Protestantism in the Haitian Diaspora of the Bahamas.
    Louis, Bertin M., Jr. (2015)
    New York: New York University Press.

    Based on 2002-05 field work. The particularly ascetic Protestants of the Haitian diaspora identify themselves as Kretyen (Christian) rather than Pwotestan (Protestant). They maintain their boundaries against Bahamians, "uncoverted" (Catholic-Vodou), & Pwotestan Haitian Bahamians.

    Associated Search Terms: Ritual; Protestant, Bahamas; Participant observation; Nationalism; Minority; Haitian Bahamians; Diaspora; Stratification; Bahamas; Music; Boundary maintenance; Transnational; Migrant
  • Religion and Immigration. Migrant Faiths in North America and Western Europe.
    Kivisto, Peter (2014)
    Indianapolis, Indiana: Polity.

    Associated Search Terms: Migration; Identity; Migrant; State; Transnational
  • Migration and conversion of Korean American Christians.
    Kim, Rebecca Y. (2014)
    In Lewis A. Rambo and Charles E. Farhadian (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Religious Conversion. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 190-208.

    Selective migration made Korean migrants to the U.S.A. disproportionately Christian. Conversion to conservative churches helped migrants cope with their experience, increasing the Christian presence. 2nd generation Korean Americans have their own congregations. There are Korean Christian missionaries to the U.S.A.

    Associated Search Terms: Generations; Korean Americans; Migrant; Missionary
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 472 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1999:
    “Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll” (Odum Institute).

    Southern and non-Southern residents are surveyed yearly and “are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues such as Southern accent, the Confederate flag and “Dixie”; race relations; feelings toward migrants to the South; and characteristics of Southerners vs. Northerners” (Odum Institute).

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill; the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill; and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution .
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 2/2/2007
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 2000:
    “Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll” (Odum Institute).

    Southern and non-Southern residents are surveyed yearly and “are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues such as Southern accent, the Confederate flag and ‘Dixie;’ race relations; feelings toward migrants to the South; and characteristics of Southerners vs. Northerners” (Odum Institute).

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill; the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill ; and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 2/2/2007
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 2000:
    “Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll” (Odum Institute).

    Southern and non-Southern residents are surveyed yearly and “are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues such as Southern accent, the Confederate flag and ‘Dixie;’ race relations; feelings toward migrants to the South; and characteristics of Southerners vs. Northerners” (Odum Institute).

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill; the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill; and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 3/20/2009
[Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • PIMMIG06 from National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    (pimmig06) Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees

    -3) All other missing data
    0) No program of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • SIMMIG98 from National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    (simmig98) What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees

    0) No program of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • SIMMIG06 from National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    (simmig06) What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees

    0) No program of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • PIMMIG06 from National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees

    -3) All other missing data
    0) No program of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • SIMMIG98 from National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees

    0) No program of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • SIMMIG06 from National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees

    -3) All other missing data
    0) No program of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • PIMMIG06 from National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, and 2012), Version 2
    What are the three most important? Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees. Remarks: OTHPRJ and PABUSE06-PVOL06 are attempts to gather information on any additional social service programs from respondents, programs they might have neglected to mention in response to SABUSE98-SVDP06 and SABUSE12-SOTHER12. Verbatim responses to this question were coded into a series of dichotomous variables, each of which indicates whether a congregation mentioned a program of a particular type. We did not ask respondents to identify collaborators for programs mentioned here. Note that these variables are not mutually exclusive. A program described as 'feeding the homeless,' for example, is coded 1 on both PFOOD06 and PHOME06. Note also that these variables are coded at the congregation level, not at the program level. This means that, if a congregation is coded 1 on several of these variables, analysts will not be able to determine whether those codes refer to one program or to more than one program. Verbatim program descriptions may be requested via a restricted-data access agreement. If congregations did not report any additional social service programs (OTHPRJ=2), these variables were set at zero.

    0) No program of this type mentioned
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • SIMMIG98 from National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, and 2012), Version 2
    [1998 and 2006-07 wording] What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? [2012 wording, if NUMPROG is less than or equal to 4] What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? [2012 wording, if NUMPROG is greater than 4] What are the 4 most important projects or programs you have sponsored or participated in? Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees. Remarks: In 1998 and 2006-07, informants were probed to describe as many programs as they could recall. In 2012, the number of projects or programs was limited to the four most important. Verbatim responses to SABUSE98-SOTHER12 were coded into a series of dichotomous variables, each of which indicates whether a congregation mentioned a program of a particular type. There are three versions of each dichotomous variable. Variables with the suffix '98' contain codes for programs mentioned in 1998, those with the suffix '06' contain codes for programs mentioned in 2006-07, and those with the suffix '12' contain codes for programs mentioned in 2012. The coding of these items is identical in all survey waves, but the questions were asked of different subsamples of congregations (see the remark on SCLSERV2). Also, a 'No' response to a program variable in 1998 and 2006-07 (e.g., SFOOD98=0) means that the congregation was not involved in such a social services program. In 2012, a 'No' response to a program variable (e.g., SFOOD12) means that such a social service program is not one of the four most important for that congregation. Appropriate recoding is necessary to assess change over time between 1998 and 2006-07 in response to these items. Care must be taken when assessing any change over time that includes 2012. Note that these variables are not mutually exclusive. A 1998 program described as 'feeding the homeless,' for example, is coded 1 on both SFOOD98 and SHOME98. Note also that these variables are coded at the congregation level, not at the program level. This means that, if a congregation is coded 1 on several of these variables, analysts will not be able to determine whether those codes refer to one program or to more than one program. Verbatim social service program descriptions may be requested via a restricted-data access agreement. This item was asked only if congregations reported social service programs (SOCLSERV=1 or SCLSERV2=1). If congregations do not have any social service programs (SOCLSERV=2 in 1998; SOCLSERV=2 and SCLSERV2=2 in 2006-07 and 2012), these variables were set at zero.

    0) No program of this type named
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • SIMMIG06 from National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, and 2012), Version 2
    [1998 and 2006-07 wording] What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? [2012 wording, if NUMPROG is less than or equal to 4] What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? [2012 wording, if NUMPROG is greater than 4] What are the 4 most important projects or programs you have sponsored or participated in? Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees. Remarks: In 1998 and 2006-07, informants were probed to describe as many programs as they could recall. In 2012, the number of projects or programs was limited to the four most important. Verbatim responses to SABUSE98-SOTHER12 were coded into a series of dichotomous variables, each of which indicates whether a congregation mentioned a program of a particular type. There are three versions of each dichotomous variable. Variables with the suffix '98' contain codes for programs mentioned in 1998, those with the suffix '06' contain codes for programs mentioned in 2006-07, and those with the suffix '12' contain codes for programs mentioned in 2012. The coding of these items is identical in all survey waves, but the questions were asked of different subsamples of congregations (see the remark on SCLSERV2). Also, a 'No' response to a program variable in 1998 and 2006-07 (e.g., SFOOD98=0) means that the congregation was not involved in such a social services program. In 2012, a 'No' response to a program variable (e.g., SFOOD12) means that such a social service program is not one of the four most important for that congregation. Appropriate recoding is necessary to assess change over time between 1998 and 2006-07 in response to these items. Care must be taken when assessing any change over time that includes 2012. Note that these variables are not mutually exclusive. A 1998 program described as 'feeding the homeless,' for example, is coded 1 on both SFOOD98 and SHOME98. Note also that these variables are coded at the congregation level, not at the program level. This means that, if a congregation is coded 1 on several of these variables, analysts will not be able to determine whether those codes refer to one program or to more than one program. Verbatim social service program descriptions may be requested via a restricted-data access agreement. This item was asked only if congregations reported social service programs (SOCLSERV=1 or SCLSERV2=1). If congregations do not have any social service programs (SOCLSERV=2 in 1998; SOCLSERV=2 and SCLSERV2=2 in 2006-07 and 2012), these variables were set at zero.

    0) No program of this type named
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

  • SIMMIG12 from National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, and 2012), Version 2
    [1998 and 2006-07 wording] What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? [2012 wording, if NUMPROG is less than or equal to 4] What projects or programs have you sponsored or participated in? [2012 wording, if NUMPROG is greater than 4] What are the 4 most important projects or programs you have sponsored or participated in? Programs directed at immigrants, migrants, or refugees. Remarks: In 1998 and 2006-07, informants were probed to describe as many programs as they could recall. In 2012, the number of projects or programs was limited to the four most important. Verbatim responses to SABUSE98-SOTHER12 were coded into a series of dichotomous variables, each of which indicates whether a congregation mentioned a program of a particular type. There are three versions of each dichotomous variable. Variables with the suffix '98' contain codes for programs mentioned in 1998, those with the suffix '06' contain codes for programs mentioned in 2006-07, and those with the suffix '12' contain codes for programs mentioned in 2012. The coding of these items is identical in all survey waves, but the questions were asked of different subsamples of congregations (see the remark on SCLSERV2). Also, a 'No' response to a program variable in 1998 and 2006-07 (e.g., SFOOD98=0) means that the congregation was not involved in such a social services program. In 2012, a 'No' response to a program variable (e.g., SFOOD12) means that such a social service program is not one of the four most important for that congregation. Appropriate recoding is necessary to assess change over time between 1998 and 2006-07 in response to these items. Care must be taken when assessing any change over time that includes 2012. Note that these variables are not mutually exclusive. A 1998 program described as 'feeding the homeless,' for example, is coded 1 on both SFOOD98 and SHOME98. Note also that these variables are coded at the congregation level, not at the program level. This means that, if a congregation is coded 1 on several of these variables, analysts will not be able to determine whether those codes refer to one program or to more than one program. Verbatim social service program descriptions may be requested via a restricted-data access agreement. This item was asked only if congregations reported social service programs (SOCLSERV=1 or SCLSERV2=1). If congregations do not have any social service programs (SOCLSERV=2 in 1998; SOCLSERV=2 and SCLSERV2=2 in 2006-07 and 2012), these variables were set at zero.

    0) No program of this type named
    1) Mentions at least one program of this type

[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-100]  (of 100 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
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