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ARDA Guiding Papers Series: Prominent scholars provide guidance on the study of religion, new research agendas, and/or commentaries on the current state of the study of religion.

                       [Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Site Features)


  Are science and religion incompatible?
  Evolution

                       [Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in QuickStats)


  Eddy, Mary Baker: Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) founded the Christian Science movement.
  Xavier University of Louisiana Founded: Xavier University of Louisiana (est. 1915) is the only historically black Catholic institution of higher learning in America.
  Hubbard, L. Ron: L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) founded Scientology, a controversial new religious movement.
  Scopes Trial: The Scopes Trial (1925) highlighted the tension between literal interpretations of creation accounts in the Bible and evolutionary theory in the 20th century.

                       [Viewing Matches 1-4]  (of 4 total matches in Timelines)


  Religion and Science, Relationship between: Are religion and science in conflict?)
  Science, Attitude towards/Trust in: Does the respondent trust science? Does the respondent feel positively towards science?

                       [Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Measurement Concepts)


 
Christian Science Family:Churches following the teachings of founder Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) , who believed that personal healing was the central message of Christianity. She believed that the correct interpretation of Scripture would alleviate disease, suffering, and even death according to her book Science and Health with Key to the Scriptures (1875). The movement became more of an institution in 1879. Worship services include readings from the Bible as well as Eddy’s “Science and Health.” The largest group in the Christian Science family is the Church of Christ, Scientist (Smith and Green 1995: 264).
 
Eddy, Mary Baker (1821-1910):Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) founded the Christian Science movement, a religious body that believes illness is an illusion. She helped establish a church of 100,000 members and founded the Christian Science Monitor , which still exists today. For more on Mary Baker Eddy, click here .
 
Scientology:A new religious movement, founded in 1953 by science fiction author L. Ron Hubbard . Scientologists believe that suffering is caused by ingrained records of past experiences ("engrams"). Scientologists aim to remove these "engrams" and become "Clears." Famous Scientologists include John Travolta and Tom Cruise (Prothero 2008: 276).
 
Divinity:A term frequently used prior to the 20th century to refer to the study of theology or the "science of divine things." The term also could refer to the quality of being divine as well as to God himself (Reid et al. 1990: 359).
 
Scopes Trial:A 1925 court case in Dayton, Tennessee, in which science teacher John Scopes was accused of violating state law by teaching Darwinian evolution instead of a creationist account. The court found John Scopes guilty, but the ruling was overturned due to a small technicality (Prothero 2008: 214). For more information on the Scopes trial, click here .
 
Biblical Inerrancy:The belief that the Bible is without error, in terms of theology, ethics, history, geography, and science. This is common in Christian fundamentalism, as opposed to evangelicals who typically have a less strict view that the Bible, and instead simply believe that the Bible is the inspired word of God (Prothero 2008: 235).
 
Secularization:1) The process of a group or individual discarding religious beliefs and practices. 2) Sociologists also refer to a society being secularized when religion loses its public presence. 3) A theory about the eventual decline of religion due to modernity (i.e. science, economic development, pluralism, etc.), which is debated among social scientists (Reid et al. 1990: 1069-1070). For more information on secularization, click here .
 
Occultism:The practices and beliefs relating to "hidden" spiritual truths or esoteric insights. These hidden truths are seen as very powerful. This tradition was somewhat underground during the Middle Ages, but became more prominent in the Renaissance. The occult worldview was basic to pre-Copernican and pre-Newtonian science. Modern groups that incorporate elements of the occult include the Liberal Catholic Church and Wicca, as well as some Neopagan groups (Smith and Green 1995: 806).
 
Hubbard, L. Ron (1911-1986):L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) founded Scientology, a controversial new religious movement. Once a science fiction writer, he became interested in the human condition and detailed techniques to rid humans of destructive behaviors in his famous book entitled Dianetics (1950). In 1954, he opened the first Church of Scientology in Los Angeles. He was accused of being a cult leader and a fraud. For more information, click here .
 
Measure/Measurement:A measure is a way to scientifically represent some part of the world. This is easier in the natural sciences. If you want to know the weight of an object, you can measure this fairly clearly and accurately. But what if you wanted to measure the religiosity of a person? You could ask in a survey how religious he or she is, how frequently they attend religious services, how often they pray, or some other "measure" of religiosity. (Statistical Term)

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10]  (of 10 total matches in the Dictionary)


  Christ Unity Spiritual Science Church
  Divine Science

                       [Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in American Denominations)


  Islam: Interactive Islam Family Tree

                       [Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Religion Family Trees)


  Religious membership report for Pulaski County, KY
  Religious membership report for Arlington County, VA
  Religious membership report for Hamilton County, OH
  Religious membership report for District Of Columbia County, DC

                       [Viewing Matches 1-4]  (of 4 total matches in RCMS County Reports)


  Religion and Science

                       [Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Learning Modules)



Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
 
A nation divided: Science, religion, and public opinion in the Untied States.
Noy, Shiri, and Timothy L. O'Brien (2016)
Socius 2:1-15.
Uses General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data to show that while opinions of people who are oriented to religion differ from those of people oriented to science, opinions of people oriented to both form a third, unique sector of public opinion.
Associated Search Terms: Science; United States; Public opinion
 
Seeking Good Debate: Religion, Science, and Conflict in American Public Life.
Evans, Michael S. (2016)
Berkeley; University of California Press.
Associated Search Terms: Science; Media; Conflict
 
Collective religiosity and the gender gap in attitudes toward economic redistribution in 74 countries, 1990-2008.
Jaime-Castillo, Antonio, Juan J. Fernández, Celia Valiente, and Damon Maryl (2016)
Social Science Research 57: 1-30.
Associated Search Terms: Religiosity, collective; Stratification; Economic; Gender
 
Individual religiosity and orientation towards science: Reformulating relationships.
Johnson, David R., Christopher P. Scheitle, and Elaine Howard Ecklund (2015)
Sociological Science 2: 106-124.
Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Science
 
Perceptions of science education among African American and white Evangelicals: A Texas case study.
Korver-Glenn, Elizabeth, Esther Chan, and Elaine Howard Ecklund (2015)
Review of Religious Research 57:1: 131-148.
Based on interviews & participant observation at a largely white upscale megachurch & at a middle class African American Baptist congregation in a Texas city. The white church's leaders & members viewed science education in terms of their theological opposition to evolution; the African American counterparts saw it in secular terms, underfunded.
Associated Search Terms: African Americans; Comparative; Congregation; Education; Evolution; Megachurch; Parish; Participant observation; Science; Southern Baptist
 
Traditional, modern, and post-secular perspectives on science and religion in the Untied States.
O'Brien, Timothy L., and Shiri Noy (2015)
American Sociological REview 80:1: 92-115.
Associated Search Terms: United States; Science; Post-secular
 
Investigating the connection between science and this-worldly oriented superstition: A research note on the case of school adolescents in urban China.
Hu, Anning (2015)
Review of Religious Research 57:4: 575-586.
Analyzes 2009 questionnaire data from junior high school students in Chinese cities. Scientific orientation & knowledge was inversely related to a magical or superstitious orientation.
Associated Search Terms: China; Magic; Science; Students, secondary
 
Occupational conditions, self-care, and obesity among clergy in the United States.
Fergerson, Todd W., Brita Andercheck, Joshua C. Tom, Brandon C. Martinez, and Samuel Stroope (2015)
Social Science Research 49: 249-263.
Associated Search Terms: Health; Clergy role; Clergy
 
Mystical Science and Practical Religion. Muslim, Hindu and Sikh Discourse on Science and Technology.
Cimino, Richard (2014)
Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield/Lexington.
Associated Search Terms: Sikh; Islam; Discourse; Hindu; Science
 
Fronteiras em movimento: o debate entre a ciência e a religião no espiritismo
Junior, Alberto Calil (2014)
Ciencias Sociales y Religión/Ciências Sociais e Religião 16/21: 116-136.
Associated Search Terms: Science; Spiritualist

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 1238 total matches in Citations)


 
General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2014 GSS. There are a total of 3,842 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.
Funded By: National Science Foundation
Collected: 2014, Uploaded 8/10/2015
 
International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III:
Started in 1984, the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) is an ongoing program of cross-national collaboration. The program develops modules that deal with areas of interest in the social sciences. These modules supplement regular national surveys. The 2008 religion module includes data from Australia, Austria, Belgium - Flanders, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Dominican Republic, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Mexico, Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, South Africa, South Korea, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, the United States of America, and Venezuela. Similar to the 1991 and 1998 ISSP religion modules, this data set includes numerous measures of religious affiliation, beliefs, and participation. It also contains measures of several social and political attitudes. Finally, the data set contains basic demographic information such as age, sex, education, and occupation. For more information, visit the ISSP 2008 website .
Funded By: The research organization in each country funds all of its own costs and the merging of the data into a cross-national data set is performed by the Zentralarchiv fuer Empirische Sozialforschung, University of Cologne.
Collected: 2008, Uploaded 9/7/2012
 
General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).
Funded By: National Science Foundation
Collected: 2012, Uploaded 10/16/2013
 
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Contextual Database, Wave I:
The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents’ social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents’ health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

* 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

To provide an array of community characteristics by which researchers may investigate the nature of such contextual influences for a wide range of adolescent health behaviors, selected contextual variables have been calculated and compiled. These are provided in this Contextual Database, already linked to the Add Health respondent IDs.
Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
 
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, In-Home, In-School, and Parent Questionnaire Data, Wave I:
The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents’ social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents’ health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

* 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

Included in this dataset are the in-home interviews, in-school questionnaire, and parent questionnaire.
Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
 
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Network Data, Wave I:
The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents’ social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents’ health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

* 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

This network data includes network variables constructed from the Add Health in-school data and friendship nominations.
Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
 
National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Grand Sample Weights, Wave I:
The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents’ social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents’ health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

* 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

Included here are weights to remove any differences between the composition of the sample and the estimated composition of the population. See the attached codebook for information regarding how these weights were calculated.
Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
 
General Social Survey Panel Data (2006 Sample):
The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This GSS panel dataset has three waves of interviews: originally sampled and interviewed in 2006, interviewed for the second time in 2008, and interviewed for the third wave in 2010. This file contains those 2,000 respondents who were pre-selected among the 2006 samples and those variables that were asked at least twice in three waves. Survey items on religion include the following: religious preference, religion raised in, spouse's religious preference, frequency of religious service attendance, religious experiences, and religious salience.

For more information on the General Social Survey, visit its website.
Funded By: National Science Foundation
Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/24/2012
 
National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007):
The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset "fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing, for the first time, data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations" (Chaves et al. 1999, p.460). Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the NCS data is the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. In 2006-07, a panel component was added to the NCS. In addition to the new cross-section of congregations generated in conjunction with the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS), a stratified random sample was drawn from congregations who participated in the 1998 NCS. A full codebook, prepared by the primary investigator, is available for download here . The codebook contains the original questionnaire, as well as detailed information on survey methodology, weights, coding, and more.

Variable names have been shortened to allow for downloading of the data set as an SPSS portable file. Original variable names are shown in parentheses at the beginning of each variable description.

The NCS Cumulative Dataset is also available from the ARDA.
Funded By: The National Congregations Study (NCS) was made possible by major grants from The Lilly Endowment, Inc. The 1998 NCS also was supported by grants from Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., the Louisville Institute, the Nonprofit Sector Research Fund of The Aspen Institute, and Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. The 2006-07 NCS also was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Kellogg Foundation, and the Louisville Institute.
Collected: 2007, Uploaded 8/27/2009
 
National Study of Youth and Religion, Wave 3 (2007-2008):
In Wave 3 every attempt was made to re-interview all English-speaking Wave 1 youth survey respondents. At the time of this third survey the respondents were between the ages of 18-24. The survey was conducted from September 24, 2007 through April 21, 2008 using a Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) system programmed using Blaise software. The Howard W. Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Odum Institute) was hired to field the Wave 3 survey. Telephone calls were spread out over varying days and times, including nights and weekends. Every effort was made to re-contact and re-survey all original NSYR respondents (whether they completed the Wave 2 telephone survey or not), including those out of the country, in the military, and on religious missions. There were more difficulties in contacting and completing the survey with respondents who were in the military during Wave 3 because some of them were serving on active duty and were unable to be reached. Even their families were often unaware of their specific locations and did not have any knowledge of phone numbers or addresses where they could be reached. The Wave 3 Survey instrument replicated many of the questions asked in Waves 1 and 2 with some changes made to better capture the respondents’ lives as they grew older. For example, there were fewer questions on parental monitoring and more on post-high school educational aspirations.

Many variable names have been truncated to allow for downloading of the data set as an SPSS portable file. Original variable names are shown in parentheses at the beginning of each variable description.
Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc.
Collected: 2008, Uploaded 9/14/2009

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 204 total matches in the Data Archive Files)


 
Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1987:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1986:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1988:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Religious Life Inventory, 1988:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1987:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1986:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1988:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Religious Life Inventory, 1986:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Religious Life Inventory, 1987:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
 
Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1986:
The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-78]  (of 78 total matches in Investigators)


 
COLSCI from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
Have you ever taken any college-level science courses?

0) Inapplicable
1) Yes
2) No
8) Don't know
9) No answer

 
SCIENTR from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
Have you ever considered working in a science-related career?

0) Inapplicable
1) Yes
2) No
8) Don't know
9) No answer

 
COLSCI from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
Have you ever taken any college-level science courses?

0) Inapplicable
1) Yes
2) No
8) Don't know
9) No answer

 
SCINEWS3 from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
You said you get most of your information about science and technology from the Internet. What is the place you are most likely to go on the Internet for science and technology information--online newspapers, online magazines or some other place on the Internet? IF RESPONDENT GIVES MORE THAN ONE PLACE OR SAYS ‘IT DEPENDS,' PROBE ONCE: Which site are you most likely to go on the Internet for science and technology information?

0) Inapplicable
1) Online newspapers
2) Online magazines
3) Science site
4) News site
5) Electronic books and reports
8) Don't know
9) No answer

 
MAJORCOL from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
In what field was that degree?

0) Inapplicable
1) Accounting/Bookkeeping
2) Advertising
3) Agriculture
4) Allied Health
5) Anthropology
6) Architecture
7) Art
8) Biology
9) Business Administration
11) Chemistry
12) Communications/Speech
13) Comm. Disorders
14) Computer Science
15) Dentistry
16) Education
17) Economics
18) Engineering
19) English
20) Finance
21) Foreign Language
22) Forestry
23) Geography
24) Geology
25) History
26) Home Economics
27) Industry & Technology
28) Journalism
29) Law
30) Law Enforcement
31) Library Science
32) Marketing
33) Mathematics
34) Medicine
35) Music
36) Nursing
40) Physical Education
41) Physics
42) Psychology
43) Political Science
44) Sociology
45) Special Education
46) Theater Arts
47) Theology
48) Veterinary Medicine
49) Liberal Arts
50) Other
51) General Sciences
52) Social Work
53) General Studies
54) Other Vocational
55) Health
57) Child development
58) Food science/nutrition/culinary arts
59) Environment science/studies
60) Social sciences
61) Human services
62) Visual arts/graphic design
63) Fine arts
64) Humanities
65) Ethnic studies
66) Educational administration
67) TV, film
68) Aviation, aeronautics
69) Statistics
70) Criminology/Criminal Justice
71) Administrative Science/Public Administration
72) Electronics
73) Urban and Regional Planning
74) Mechanics/Machine Trade
77) Public Relations
78) Textiles/Cloth
79) Parks and Recreation
80) Information technology
98) Don't know/Uncoded
99) No answer

 
VISSCI from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
A science or technology museum. How many times did you visit a science or technology museum during the last year?

-1) Inapplicable
0) 0
1) 1
2) 2
3) 3
4) 4
5) 5
6) 6
7) 7
8) 8
10) 10
15) 15
50) 50
998) Don't know
999) No answer

 
MAJOR1 from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
What was your major or field of study when you received your (respondent's college degree) degree? First mention

0) Inapplicable
1) Accounting/Bookkeeping
2) Advertising
3) Agriculture/Horticulture
5) Anthropology
6) Architecture
7) Art
8) Biology
9) Business Administration
11) Chemistry
12) Communications/Speech
13) Comm. Disorders
14) Computer Science
15) Dentistry
16) Education
17) Economics
18) Engineering
19) English
20) Finance
21) Foreign Language
22) Forestry
24) Geology
25) History
27) Industry & Technology
28) Journalism
29) Law
30) Law Enforcement
31) Library Science
32) Marketing
33) Mathematics
34) Medicine
35) Music
36) Nursing
38) Pharmacy
39) Philosophy
40) Physical Education
41) Physics
42) Psychology
43) Political Science/International Relations
44) Sociology
45) Special Education
46) Theater Arts
47) Theology
48) Veterinary Medicine
49) Liberal Arts
50) Other
51) General Sciences
52) Social Work
53) General Studies
54) Other Vocational
55) Health
56) Industrial Relations
57) Child/Human/Family Development
58) Food Science/Nutrition/Culinary Arts
59) Environmental Science/Ecology
60) Social Sciences
61) Human Services/Human Resources
62) Visual Arts/Graphic Design/Design and Drafting
63) Fine Arts
65) Ethnic studies
66) Educational administration
68) Aviation/Aeronautics
70) Criminology/Criminal Justice
71) Administrative Science/Public Administration
72) Electronics
73) Urban and Regional Planning
75) Dance
76) Gerontology
77) Public Relations
78) Textiles/Cloth
79) Parks and Recreation
98) Don't know/Uncoded

 
MAJOR1 from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
What was your major or field of study when you received your (respondent's college degree) degree? First mention

0) Inapplicable
1) Accounting/bookkeeping
2) Advertising
3) Agriculture/horticulture
4) Allied health
5) Anthropology
6) Architecture
7) Art
8) Biology
9) Business administration
11) Chemistry
12) Communications/speech
13) Comm. disorders
14) Computer science
15) Dentistry
16) Education
17) Economics
18) Engineering
19) English
20) Finance
21) Foreign language
23) Geography
24) Geology
25) History
27) Industry & Technology
28) Journalism
29) Law
30) Law enforcement
31) Library science
32) Marketing
33) Mathematics
34) Medicine
35) Music
36) Nursing
38) Pharmacy
40) Physical education
41) Physics
42) Psychology
43) Political science/international relations
44) Sociology
45) Special education
46) Theater arts
47) Theology
48) Veterinary medicine
49) Liberal arts
50) Other
51) General sciences
52) Social work
53) General studies
54) Other vocational
55) Health
57) Child/Human/Family Development
58) Food Science/Nutrition/Culinary Arts
59) Environmental Science/Ecology
60) Social Sciences
61) Human Services/Human Resources
62) Visual Arts/Graphic Design/Design and Drafting
63) Fine Arts
64) Humanities
65) Ethnic studies
66) Educational administration
67) Television/Film
68) Aviation/Aeronatics
70) Criminology/Criminal Justice
71) Administrative Science/Public Administration
72) Electronics
73) Urban and Regional Planning
74) Mechanics/Machine Trade
77) Public Relations
78) Textiles/Cloth
79) Parks and Recreation
80) Information Systems
98) Don't know/Uncoded
99) No answer

 
MAJOR2 from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
What was your major or field of study when you received your (respondent's college degree) degree? Second mention

0) Inapplicable
1) Accounting/Bookkeeping
7) Art
8) Biology
9) Business Administration
11) Chemistry
14) Computer Science
15) Dentistry
16) Education
17) Economics
19) English
20) Finance
21) Foreign Language
24) Geology
25) History
27) Industry & Technology
29) Law
32) Marketing
33) Mathematics
34) Medicine
35) Music
36) Nursing
38) Pharmacy
39) Philosophy
42) Psychology
43) Political Science/International Relations
44) Sociology
45) Special Education
46) Theater Arts
47) Theology
50) Other
52) Social Work
57) Child/Human/Family Development
59) Environmental Science/Ecology
60) Social Sciences
61) Human Services/Human Resources
62) Visual Arts/Graphic Design/Design And Drafting
67) Television/Film
68) Aviation/Aeronautics
69) Statistics/Biostatistics
73) Urban And Regional Planning
78) Textiles/Cloth
79) Parks and Recreation
98) Don't know/Uncoded
99) No Answer

 
SCINEWS1 from General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
You said you get most of your information about science and technology from newspapers. Would that be printed newspapers or online newspapers?

0) Inapplicable
1) Printed newspapers
2) Online newspapers
3) Other (specify)
9) No answer

                       [Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 1156 total matches in Data Archive)


 
Cognitive Theories: "Cognitive science is the interdisciplinary study of mind and intelligence, embracing philosophy, psychology, artificial intelligence, neuroscience, linguistics, and anthropology."…

                       [Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Theories)


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