Timeline
[Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in Timelines)
Teaching Tools
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Female leadership and role congruity within the clergy: Communal leaders experience no gender differences eyt agentic women continue to suffer backlash.
    Ferguson, Todd W. (2018)
    Sex Roles 78(5): 409-422. DOI: 10.1007/s11199-017-0803-6.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Clergy role; Feminism; Women
  • It's a total way of life? Catholic priests, women's ordination, and identity work.
    Harvey, Peter Francis (2018)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57:3: 547-566.

    Based on 2013-15 interviews with Catholic priests in the U.K., about ordaining women. Interviewees used identity work to maintain their stands. "Total identity priests" absorbed themselves in their role, & they opposed women's ordination; "plural identity priests" were ready to interface with society in various ways, & favored women's ordination.

    Associated Search Terms: Women; Role engulfment; Great Britain; Identity; Clergy; Catholic, Great Britain
  • Religious resistance to Trump: Progressive faith and the Women's March on Chicago.
    Beyerlein, Kraig, and Peter Ryan (2018)
    Sociology of Religion 79:2: 196-219.

    Based on interviews with clergy & lay participants in the January 21, 2017 Women's March in Chicago. Religion was a secondary factor in motivation & leadership.

    Associated Search Terms: Activism; Politics, U.S.A.; Social movement; United States, Illinois, Chicago
  • Revisiting gender and religion.
    Charlton, Joy C. (2015)
    Review of Religious Research 57:3: 331-339.

    Review of the experiences of the 1st generation of female Protestant clergy & female scholars in the study of religion.

    Associated Search Terms: Women; Gender; Clergy
  • The effects of descriptive associational leadership in civic engagement: The case of clergy and gender in Protestant denominations.
    Djupe, Paul A. (2014)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 53:3: 497-514

    Analyzes 2011 U.S. Congregational Life Study data. The effect of female clergy on female congregants' congregational & political participation is small.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Clergy influence; Politics, U.S.A.; Women
  • Feminization of the theological field and its implications to Church life--Analysis of the growth of women in ministry in Finland.
    Niemelä, Kati (2013)
    In Simone Mantei, Regina Sommer, and Ulrike Wagner-Rau (eds.) Geschlechterverhältnisse und Pfarrberuf in Wandel. Irritationen, Analysen, Forschungsperspektiven. Practische Teologie heute. Stuttgart Kohlhammer, pp. 165-180.

    Analyzes 2011 U.S. Congregational Life Study data. The effect of female clergy on female congregants' congregational & political participation is small.


    Associated Search Terms: Change; Clergy; Finland; Women
  • An increasingly female, increasingly urban and increasingly liberal clergy changing Church life in Finland: patterns of change among the clergy in Finland.
    Niemelä, Kati (2012)
    In Kati Niemelä (ed.) Church Work and Management in Change. Publication 61. Tampere: Church Research Institute, pp. 112-131.

    Analyzes 2011 U.S. Congregational Life Study data. The effect of female clergy on female congregants' congregational & political participation is small.



    Associated Search Terms: Liberal/conservative; Finland; Women; Change; Clergy
  • Biblical literalism: A test of the compensatory schema hypothesis among Anglicans in England.
    Village, Andrew (2012)
    Review of Religious Research 54:2: 175-196.

    Analyzes 2000-02 clergy survey data & 2004-07 lay member data from the Church of England. Education (inversely) rather than gender predicted literalism, even among conservatives & evangelical believers, thus not supporting the theory that literalism compensates for a lack of access to leadership positions in a church.

    Associated Search Terms: Church of England; Clergy; Gender; Great Britain, England; Literalism; Literalism scale; Women
  • Female clergy as agents of religious change.
    Niemelä, Kati (2011)
    Religions 2:3: 358-371.

    Analyzes 2000-02 clergy survey data & 2004-07 lay member data from the Church of England. Education (inversely) rather than gender predicted literalism, even among conservatives & evangelical believers, thus not supporting the theory that literalism compensates for a lack of access to leadership positions in a church.


    Associated Search Terms: Change; Clergy; Women
  • American Religion. Contemporary Trends.
    Chaves, Mark (2011)
    Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.

    Uses 1972-2008 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data & 1998 & 2006-07 National Congregations Study data to trace religious patterns & changes in the U.S.A.

    Associated Search Terms: Women; Sexual attitudes; Seminarians; Practice; Membership; Literalism; Politics, U.S.A.; Clergy image; Belief; Abortion; United States; Homosexuality
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-100]  (of 100 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • Women of the Cloth, 1983:
    More than 1,300 female and male clergy, seminary faculty, church executives and lay people of nine major Protestant denominations were interviewed regarding their views on church ministry and involvement in the community. These data also provide information regarding men and women's attitudes towards female leadership in the church, as well as information regarding clergy members' seminary and ministry experiences.
    Funded By: The Ford Foundation Hartford Seminary Iliff School of Theology
    Collected: 1983, Uploaded 7/20/1999
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2001 - Presbyterian Women and Other Topics, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2001 survey focuses on Presbyterian Women and Other Topics.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 12/19/2007
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2001 - Presbyterian Women and Other Topics, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2001 survey focuses on Presbyterian Women and Other Topics.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 12/19/2007
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2001 - Presbyterian Women and Other Topics, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2001 survey focuses on Presbyterian Women and Other Topics.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 12/19/2007
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2007 - Women in the Church, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2007 survey focuses on women in the church.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 6/27/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2007 - Women in the Church, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2007 survey focuses on women in the church.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 6/27/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2007 - Women in the Church, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2007 survey focuses on women in the church.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 6/27/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2007 - Women in the Church, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The November 2007 survey focuses on women in the church.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 6/27/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2015 - Gender and Leadership in the PC(USA), Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel consists of two nationally representative samples of groups affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.): members of congregations and teaching elders (ministers of the Word and Sacrament). A new group of panelists are invited to participate every three years. Panel surveys are conducted quarterly, by mail or with an online completion option.

    The Panel is maintained and directed by the office of Research Services of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The first Panel was created in 1973 to provide a means of informing leaders of the opinions and activities of Presbyterians across the church. Survey topics and questions are usually developed at the request of, and in consultation with, staff or elected members of national church entities. However, ultimate decisions on content and the disposition of Panel data are those of Research Services. Standards developed by the American Association of Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) guide Panel surveys, and Research Services is a charter member of AAPOR's Transparency Initiative.

    This study was commissioned by the Racial Ethnic & Women's Ministries office of the Presbyterian Mission Agency. This panel study is part of a larger research project assessing the status of women at all levels of the church and conducted in two main research areas: theological and sociological. The goals of this broader study are to (1) learn more about how women participate in leadership within the PC(USA); (2) gain a keener grasp of what factors support or constrain women's ministry; and (3) gain deeper insight into the varying experiences of men and women in ministry, including similarities and differences in compensation, career trajectories, and decisions to leave ministry.
    Funded By: Racial Ethnic & Women's Ministries Office of the Presbyterian Mission Agency
    Collected: 2015, Uploaded 2/5/2020
[Viewing Matches 1-9]  (of 9 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Investigators/Researchers
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Investigators)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • VGAU1_98 from National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    (vgauthr1_98) Who wrote or produced the voter guide that was distributed? (FIRST MENTION)

    -3) All other missing data
    -2) Don't know
    1) City, county, or state government
    2) Candidate or political party, unspecified
    3) Church member, clergy or other congregation
    4) Local council of churches, or ecumenical organization
    5) Pro-life groups
    6) League of Women Voters
    7) NAACP
    8) Catholic church/organization (including regional or diocesan office or newspaper)
    10) Citizens Concerned for the Constitution
    12) Christian Coalition
    13) 700 Club/Pat Robertson
    14) Focus on the Family/Dr. James Dobson
    17) Family Forum (Michigan)
    18) Regional church office, unspecified denomination
    19) Other
    20) Can't tell
    21) Common Cause

  • VGAU1_06 from National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007)
    (vgauthr1_06) Who wrote or produced the voter guide that was distributed? (FIRST MENTION)

    -3) All other missing data
    -2) Don't know
    -1) Refused
    1) City, county, or state government
    2) Candidate or political party, unspecified
    3) Church member, clergy or other congregation
    4) Local council of churches, or ecumenical organization
    5) Pro-life groups
    6) League of Women Voters
    8) Catholic church/organization (including regional or diocesan office or newspaper)
    12) Christian Coalition
    13) 700 Club/Pat Robertson
    14) Focus on the Family/Dr. James Dobson
    16) Citizens for Traditional Values and/or Lou Sheldon
    17) Family Forum (Michigan)
    18) Regional church office, unspecified denomination
    19) Other
    20) Can't tell
    23) [Colorado for] Family Values; [Florida] Family Council (i.e. "Family" organization)

  • WOMCHRHX from Faith Matters Survey, 2006
    Qn13_xf. Women should be allowed to be priests or clergy in my house of worship. (WOMCHRCHX)

    1) Disagree strongly
    2) Disagree
    4) Agree
    5) Agree strongly

  • WOMCHRCH from Faith Matters Survey, 2006
    13-1f. Please tell me whether you basically agree or basically disagree. How about . . . Women should be allowed to be priests or clergy in my house of worship?

    1) Basically agree
    2) Basically disagree
    8) Don't know/No opinion
    9) No answer/Refused

  • WOMCHR11 from Faith Matters Survey, 2011
    13-1f (combined). I'm going to read a list of statements that some people agree with and others don't. For each, please tell me whether you basically agree or basically disagree. How about--Women should be allowed to be priests or clergy in my house of worship? (WOMCHRCHX_11)

    1) Disagree strongly
    2) Disagree somewhat
    4) Agree somewhat
    5) Agree strongly

  • RT13_1_1 from Faith Matters Survey, 2006
    Question order: 13_1_01 (ROT13_1_01)

    1) Religion is a private matter that should be kept out of . . .
    2) It is perfectly proper for religious leaders to try . . .
    3) The courts have gone too far . . .
    4) I have a lot of confidence in the Catholic hierarchy
    5) It is possible to disagree with the pope on issues like . . .
    6) Women should be allowed to be priests and clergy in my church
    7) Religious diversity has been good for America
    9) We will all be called before God to answer for our sins
    10) Morality is a personal matter and society should not . . .

  • RT13_1_2 from Faith Matters Survey, 2006
    Question order: 13_1_02 (ROT13_1_02)

    1) Religion is a private matter that should be kept out of . . .
    2) It is perfectly proper for religious leaders to try . . .
    3) The courts have gone too far . . .
    4) I have a lot of confidence in the Catholic hierarchy
    5) It is possible to disagree with the pope on issues like . . .
    6) Women should be allowed to be priests and clergy in my church
    7) Religious diversity has been good for America
    9) We will all be called before God to answer for our sins
    10) Morality is a personal matter and society should not . . .

  • RT13_1_3 from Faith Matters Survey, 2006
    Question order: 13_1_03 (ROT13_1_03)

    1) Religion is a private matter that should be kept out of . . .
    2) It is perfectly proper for religious leaders to try . . .
    3) The courts have gone too far . . .
    4) I have a lot of confidence in the Catholic hierarchy
    5) It is possible to disagree with the pope on issues like . . .
    6) Women should be allowed to be priests and clergy in my church
    7) Religious diversity has been good for America
    9) We will all be called before God to answer for our sins
    10) Morality is a personal matter and society should not . . .

  • RT13_1_4 from Faith Matters Survey, 2006
    Question order: 13_1_04 (ROT13_1_04)

    1) Religion is a private matter that should be kept out of . . .
    2) It is perfectly proper for religious leaders to try . . .
    3) The courts have gone too far . . .
    4) I have a lot of confidence in the Catholic hierarchy
    5) It is possible to disagree with the pope on issues like . . .
    6) Women should be allowed to be priests and clergy in my church
    7) Religious diversity has been good for America
    9) We will all be called before God to answer for our sins
    10) Morality is a personal matter and society should not . . .

  • RT13_1_5 from Faith Matters Survey, 2006
    Question order: 13_1_05 (ROT13_1_05)

    1) Religion is a private matter that should be kept out of . . .
    2) It is perfectly proper for religious leaders to try . . .
    3) The courts have gone too far . . .
    4) I have a lot of confidence in the Catholic hierarchy
    5) It is possible to disagree with the pope on issues like . . .
    6) Women should be allowed to be priests and clergy in my church
    7) Religious diversity has been good for America
    9) We will all be called before God to answer for our sins
    10) Morality is a personal matter and society should not . . .

[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-94]  (of 94 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
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