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Recent Additions

Religious Freedom Index: American Perspectives on the First Amendment, 2020 (Uploaded: 12/18/2020)

The Religious Freedom Index gives a unique look into American public opinion on First Amendment freedoms. The Index's focus on core religious liberty principles, contextualized with questions on some of the year's most pressing social issues, provides a yearly cross section of public sentiment on the intersection of law, religion, and culture.

The Index covers six dimensions of religious freedom: Religious Pluralism, Religion and Policy, Religious Sharing, Religion in Society, Church and State, and Religion in Action. The scores on these dimensions contribute to an annual composite Index score on a scale from 0 to 100 where 0 indicates complete opposition to principles of religious freedom and 100 indicates robust support.

In addition to the annual Index questions, this year's poll asked about Americans' opinions on the intersection of religious liberty and the COVID-19 pandemic, elections, and racial justice.

Survey of Faith-Based Nonprofit Organizations, 2011 (Uploaded: 12/18/2020)

The 2011 Survey of Faith-Based Nonprofit Organizations (preceded by Christian Nonprofit Organizations, 2005) collects information on the history, activities, and leadership of a number of religious nonprofit organizations. Variables include measures of revenue, expenses, activities and religious identity, as well as demographic information on the founder(s) of these organizations.

ISPU American Muslim Poll, 2019 (Uploaded: 12/18/2020)

SSRS conducted a survey of Muslims, Jews and the General Population for the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding from January 8 through January 28, 2019. The study investigated the opinions of Muslims, Jews and the General Population regarding the government, the most important issues facing the country, faith customs and religious/race/gender discrimination.

The Confirmation Project Combined Questionnaire (Uploaded: 12/18/2020)

This data set represents the quantitative portion of The Confirmation Project, collected from nationwide surveys of confirmation leaders, student participants, and parents in five Christian denominations in the USA. The five denominations included the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME), the United Methodist Church (UMC), the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA), the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), and the Episcopal Church. All five denominations share a Protestant heritage and practice infant baptism. Survey respondents represent more than 3,000 congregations in these five denominations. Data were collected in two waves: October 2014-April 2015 and January-April 2016.

Relationships in America Survey (2014) (Uploaded: 11/20/2020)

This survey provides a broad overview of the social forces that shape American society and documents trends that affect individual and familial well-being. It asks respondents about a wide variety of human-interest topics, from their participation in religious services and religious beliefs, to questions about their attitudes regarding marriage, divorce, cohabitation, and other family forms, to specifics about sexual behavior, abuse, and domestic violence.

Longitudinal Study of the Second Generation in Spain, Waves 1, 2 and Parent Survey (Uploaded: 11/20/2020)

This data archive provides the first large-scale longitudinal study of children of immigrants (one or both parents born abroad or brought to the host country at or before age five) and immigrant children (the 1.5 generation: older than age five but still in their childhood or adolescence) successfully carried out in Spain, or any Western European country. It was designed to replicate the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study carried out in the United States in the 1990s and early 2000s. For Wave 1, almost 7,000 children of immigrants attending basic secondary school in close to 200 educational centers in both cities took part in the study.

The original survey was conducted in 2007-2008; four years later, the same sample was traced and re-interviewed either at school, via telephone, or through contact in the social media (Facebook and Twitter). Through these means, the research team was able to identify and re-interview 73 percent of the original sample for which retrieval information was available. An additional replacement sample of over 1,500 second generation youths of the same average age as the original respondents was interviewed in the same schools in which the original study took place. Finally, and for comparative purposes, a sample of approximately 1,600 native-parentage Spanish youths was interviewed at the same time.

Together the surveys cover all relevant aspects of adaptation and psycho-social development in late childhood and adolescence, including educational achievement and aspirations; labor market participation, occupation, and income; family structure and inter-generational relations; language knowledge, preferences, and use; friends' national origins and educational plans; national self-identification, self-esteem, and other psychological outcomes, and religion. To supplement the information from immigrant children, the study also conducted a person-to-person survey of 25 percent of their parents in 2010. They were interviewed in Spanish or in their native language. The parental survey is representative of the earlier studies sample, including near identical proportions of all foreign nationalities present in the latter.

Middle Eastern Values Panel Study (Uploaded: 11/20/2020)

The Comparative Panel Survey on the Dynamics of Change: Belief Formation and Political Engagement in Egypt, Tunisia, and Turkey is an extension of comparative historical studies of ideological production and cross-national values surveys, which show associations between changes in social conditions and changes in the dominant sociopolitical discourses and people's value orientations in the contemporary Middle East and North Africa. It is, however, unclear how changes in these conditions explain changes in discourses and values. To better understand the dynamic of change and advance a mechanistic explanation of change in values and political engagement, this project has launched a panel study, the Comparative Panel Survey on the Dynamics of Change: Belief Formation and Political Engagement in Egypt, Tunisia, and Turkey. This panel study intends to explain (1) changes in sociopolitical and cultural values; (2) examine how variation in participation in such activities as peaceful demonstrations, political protests, and political violence is linked to changes in (a) inter-group relations, (b) identity and framing, (c) attitudes toward the West and liberal values, (d) religious fundamentalism, (e) dysphoric emotions and personal efficacy, and (f) sources of news information (the Internet, satellite TV, mobiles); (3) assess how people's perceptions of corruption and trustworthiness of public officials are linked to political action and conflict; and (4) evaluate the implications of this study for peace and security.

PRRI 2018 American Values Survey (Uploaded: 11/20/2020)

The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Institute's (PRRI) annual multi-issue survey on religion, culture and public policy. The survey is conducted in the fall each year. The goal of PRRI is to help journalists, scholars, pundits, thought leaders, clergy and the public better understand debates on public policy and the religious and cultural atmosphere that is shaping American politics and society.

The 2018 American Values Survey consisted of interviews with 2,509 adults who were spread across all 50 states and Washington, D.C. A battery of questions were included to assess the results of the 2018 Midterm elections. Questions related to views on government and reasons to vote were asked on the survey. More specifically, Americans were asked to assess the presidential candidate, the FBI and special counsel. An additional section on culture -- including race, sexual harassment and immigration -- was a part of the survey.

Comparative Cross-National Study in the Middle East and North Africa (Uploaded: 11/20/2020)

The questionnaire used in this project (the Comparative Cross-National Study of Religious Fundamentalism, Developmental Idealism, Values, and Morality in the Middle East and North Africa) is part of the larger Middle Eastern Values Study (MEVS) and consists of over 250 items and covers the following topics:

(1) Religious Fundamentalism-attitudinal measures of religious fundamentalism are constructed and extensively tested, which are applicable to both Christian and Muslim (Shia and Sunni) fundamentalism, are available for the entire eight countries.

(2) Cultural Values-measures of attitudes toward gender relations, form of government, secular politics, morality, religiosity, national identity and pride, and other values are included for the entire eight countries.

(3) Sources of News Information-measures of the sources of information that the respondents rely on, including radio, TV, newspapers, the Internet, mobile phone, and so forth are available for the entire eight countries.

(4) Developmental Idealism-measures of the type of change respondents' associate with Westernization and the type of change they associate with development are available for only the five surveys carried out in 2011: Egypt, Iraq, Lebanon, Pakistan, and Saudi Arabia. For more information on developmental idealism project, see https://developmentalidealism.org/.

(5) Political Engagement-measures of political engagement are available for Jordan, Tunisia, and Turkey. For other countries, there are a few questions on this topic.

(6) Attitudes toward Violence-several items measuring attitudes toward political violence and suicide terrorism against Americans, Europeans, and people from the respondents' country included in the eight-country survey.

(7) Demographics-Data on gender, age, marital status, area of residence, ethnicity, income, education, employment status and occupation, and self-described social class are available for all the countries.

The questionnaire used for data collection in Turkey in 2013 includes a majority of the questions used in the data collection in the other countries.

Note that the questionnaire used for Jordan in 2016 contains only a portion of the questions used in the data collection in other countries. This file is not included in the final dataset, but is available as a separate file. See the Middle Eastern Values Study website for more information.

PRRI 2018 American Values Survey -- Supplemental (Uploaded: 11/20/2020)

The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Institute's (PRRI) annual multi-issue survey on religion, culture and public policy. The survey is conducted in the fall each year. The goal of PRRI is to help journalists, scholars, pundits, thought leaders, clergy and the public better understand debates on public policy and the religious and cultural atmosphere that is shaping American politics and society.

The 2018 American Values Supplemental Survey consisted of interviews with 1,003 adults who were spread across all fifty states and Washington DC. Data collected from this survey are combined and analyzed along with the 2018 American Values Survey. A battery of questions were included to supplement the former questionnaire to assess American views on government, abortion, women and homosexuality. The 2018 American Values Survey is also available at the ARDA.

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