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Recent Additions

PRRI/AAR Religion, Values and Climate Change Survey, November 2014 (Uploaded: 2/19/2021)

The PRRI/AAR 2014 Religion, Values, and Climate Change Survey was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute, in partnership with the American Academy of Religion, to examine attitudes on climate change with regard to religious beliefs. Questions not only assessed views on climate change and religion, but also asked questions about consumption of news media, other environmental issues, and general religiosity and religious values.

PRRI 2015 American Values Survey (Uploaded: 2/19/2021)

The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Institute's (PRRI) annual multi-issue survey on religion, culture and public policy. The survey is conducted in the fall each year. The goal of PRRI is to help journalists, scholars, pundits, thought leaders, clergy and the public better understand debates on public policy and the religious and cultural atmosphere that is shaping American politics and society.

The 2015 American Values Survey consisted of interviews with 2,695 adults who were spread across all fifty states and Washington, D.C. A battery of questions were included to assess American opinions about jobs, unemployment and immigration. The survey also included a section on America's views on cultural change and discrimination against race in the criminal justice system.

Faith Communities Today Survey (FACT) 2015, Seventh-day Adventists (Uploaded: 2/19/2021)

The Faith Communities Today (FACT) surveys are a series of national surveys of U.S. congregations run by the Cooperative Congregational Studies Partnership. The first FACT survey was launched back in 2000, with the largest national survey of congregations ever conducted in the United States. Coordinated by the Hartford Institute for Religion Research at the Hartford Seminary, these surveys aim to not only compare and contrast congregational life across religious traditions but also provide insight into the changing nature of congregational life in the United States.

The 2015 FACT survey is a smaller version of the large national surveys completed at the beginning of each decade. Only surveying 4,436 congregations, this sample focused on completing a random oversample from 11 faith groups, in addition to a random national survey of non-partner congregations. Questions on the survey ranged from programs, demographics of the congregation, mission and identity, and projection of the future for the congregation. The FACT 2015 survey also only surveyed the male clergy. An additional question about the role of the respondent was added at the end of the survey.

PRRI 2017 Kids' Wellbeing Survey (Uploaded: 2/19/2021)

The Public Religion Research Institute's (PRRI) 2017 Kids' Wellbeing Survey, which includes an oversample of people from the Southeast and Southwest, studies public views on policies that impact America's youth, including beliefs about the importance of helping underprivileged youth succeed. It looks at optimism about the country's future, concern about opportunities for success, and barriers to achieving success across racial and ethnic backgrounds, socioeconomic groups, and immigration status. The survey also probes attitudes toward the criminal justice system, including whether judges should consider the impact of sentencing and prison-assignment decisions on children and families and how the system should deal with crime committed by young people. It asks questions about child welfare policies and the extent to which the government is responsible for addressing and resolving problems facing American children and families.

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1993 (Uploaded: 2/19/2021)

This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. The 1993 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest, including quality of life, work, agriculture, outdoor recreation and exercise, historic preservation, alternative fuel, children and family, healthcare, crime, domestic violence, and alcoholism.

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1992 (Uploaded: 2/19/2021)

This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. The 1992 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest, including quality of life, work, health insurance, information-age technology, energy consumption, children and family, social issues, outdoor recreation and exercise, and food consumption.

Taiwan Social Change Survey 2014, Religion (Uploaded: 1/29/2021)

In the early 1980s, the former National Science Council (now the Ministry of Science and Technology) initiated the Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS), which completed the first national representative survey in 1985. Since 1990, the annual TSCS has consisted of two independent survey modules each year. To facilitate time series comparisons, the TSCS devotes one of the two annual survey modules to repeat major research topics every five years. The other module of the annual survey focuses on other social phenomena that are important to the social sciences and the Taiwanese society alike. All the data collected by the TSCS have been released, free of charge, to the academic community.

The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2002, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS). All the data collected by the TSCS have been released, free of charge, to the academic community. By the end of 2014, the TSCS series has accumulated 54 survey data sets, which cover behaviors, attitudes, and values of 113,327 respondents. In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community. This survey is the fifth year and six wave of Questionnaire II: Religion.

The Religion Questionnaire continues the religion survey in the fifth year and fifth wave in 2009. Because in 2009 the survey adopted Religion Core Questionnaire by ISSP, the originally decided items on religion and culture were not fully included. This wave plans to fill the gaps and the survey is designed according to points listed below. First, although outdated items were removed since the fourth year fifth wave, items recording long term social changes, especially those recording religion and social changes in slow paces should remain. Second, regardless of social structure and individual levels, religion and culture are highly correlated. Topics of this survey includes: 1. Cultures and Values, 2. Religious Globalization, 3. Festivalization, culturalization, and spiritualization of folk religions, 4. Relevant phenomenon of Christian Charismatic Movement, 5. Social participation.

PRRI 2016 American Values Survey (Uploaded: 1/29/2021)

The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Institute's (PRRI) annual multi-issue survey on religion, culture and public policy. The survey is conducted in the fall each year. The goal of PRRI is to help journalists, scholars, pundits, thought leaders, clergy and the public better understand debates on public policy and the religious and cultural atmosphere that is shaping American politics and society.

The 2016 American Values Survey consisted of interviews with 2,010 adults who were spread across all 50 states and Washington, D.C. A set of questions were included to assess the results of the 2016 election. Questions related to views on American culture and the direction of the country were also asked on the survey. More specifically, Americans were asked to assess the political climate, American values and the prospects of the next generation. An additional section on society -- including immigration, minimum wage, taxation and the criminal justice system wrapped up the survey.

PRRI 2017 American Values Survey (Uploaded: 1/29/2021)

The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Institute's (PRRI) annual multi-issue survey on religion, culture and public policy. The survey is conducted in the fall each year. The goal of PRRI is to help journalists, scholars, pundits, thought leaders, clergy and the public better understand debates on public policy and the religious and cultural atmosphere that is shaping American politics and society.

The 2017 American Values Survey consisted of interviews with 2,019 adults who were spread across all 50 states and Washington, D.C. Questions focused on assessing Trump's presidency and various political issues. More specifically, Americans were asked to comment on Trump's favorability, the impeachment and policies on immigration, healthcare and foreign policy. An additional section was included on sexual harassment, the National Anthem, Confederate monuments and media bias.

Presbyterian Panel Survey, June 2016 - Environmental Stewardship, All (Uploaded: 1/29/2021)

The Presbyterian Panel consists of two nationally representative samples of groups affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.): members of congregations and teaching elders (ministers of the Word and Sacrament). A new group of panelists are invited to participate every three years. Panel surveys are conducted quarterly, by mail or with an online completion option.

The Panel is maintained and directed by the office of Research Services of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The first Panel was created in 1973 to provide a means of informing leaders of the opinions and activities of Presbyterians across the church. Survey topics and questions are usually developed at the request of, and in consultation with, staff or elected members of national church entities. However, ultimate decisions on content and the disposition of Panel data are those of Research Services. Standards developed by the American Association of Public Opinion Research (AAPOR) guide Panel surveys, and Research Services is a charter member of AAPOR's Transparency Initiative.

Care for creation has been an ongoing priority for the PC(USA) for many years. Environmental issues were again a part of the discussion at General Assembly 221 in Detroit. This ongoing concern led the executives of the six PC(USA) agencies to form an environmental stewardship working group. This working group has created a 'white paper' which outlines the environmental theology and policies of the PC(USA), as well as describes what each agency is doing (and can do) to protect and honor the environment.

This 'white paper,' titled Collaborative Agenda for Environmental Stewardship, has been adopted by each of the six agencies' boards, and has been sent to the 222nd General Assembly meeting (in 2016, in Portland), for the commissioners' endorsement.

This Presbyterian Panel survey on the environment was conducted by PC(USA) Research Services at the request of this working group, to supplement other aspects of their proposal for the 2016 General Assembly. This survey is the fourth full Presbyterian Panel survey to be completed by the 2015-2017 panelists.

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