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The ARDA Data Archive is a collection of surveys, polls, and other data submitted by researchers and made available online by the ARDA.

There are 1,282 data files included in the ARDA collection. You can browse files by category, alphabetically, view the newest additions, or search for a file. Once you select a file you can preview the results, read about how the data were collected, review the survey questions asked, save selected survey questions to your own file, and/or download the data file.

International Surveys and Data +

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          Pew's Global Restrictions on Religion Data +

          Religious Characteristics of States Data Project +

          The Religion and State Project +

          World Religion Project +

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   Multiple Nation Surveys +

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U.S. Church Membership Data +

      County-Level Data +

      State-Level Data +

U.S. Surveys +

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     National Surveys +

              Add Health Surveys +

              Baylor Religion Surveys +

              Chapman University Survey of American Fears +

              General Social Surveys +

              National Election Studies +

              National Health and Nutrition Examination +

              National Studies of Youth and Religion (NSYR) +

              National Survey of Family Growth +

              News Polls +

              Pew Research Center +

              Portraits of American Life Study (PALS) +

              Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) +

              State of the First Amendment Surveys +

              Other National Surveys +

     Local/Regional Surveys -

              Middletown Data

Middletown Area Study (Autumn), 1981
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1981 fall survey focused on mobility and politics. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study (Spring), 1981
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1981 Spring survey focused on the degree of awareness of the services offered by Community Development and specific community services provided to the elderly. Attitudes concerning governmental funding of these services and abortion were also assessed. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1978
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1978 survey focused on lifestyle in Muncie, Indiana and overall life satisfaction. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1979
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1979 survey focused on public attitudes and perceptions of housing problems, employment, family life, subjective well-being and other social issues and concerns. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1980
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1980 survey focused on contact with family, extent of discipline of children, marital satisfaction and task sharing, and other social issues and concerns. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1982
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1982 survey focused on public attitudes toward life, economy, politics, education, family and religion. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1983
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1983 survey focused on current events such as nuclear weapons, child abuse and the "moral majority." [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1984
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1984 survey focused on religion and politics. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1985
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The target of the 1985 study was Delaware County, Indiana, residents who were 18 years or older. Subjective and physical well-being, public attitudes and knowledge of AIDS and other social issues and concerns were the major focus. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1986
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1986 study focused on issues of "economic justice," religious beliefs, AIDS, and attitudes about computers in society. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1987
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1987 study was specifically designed to assess the degree of interaction between parents (60 years of age or older) and adult children. Topics of inquiry also included religion and politics, division of household labor, and attitudes about alcoholism. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1988
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1988 study was specifically designed to address issues pertaining to the 1988 presidential election. Social and political concerns such as disarmament, trade deficit, budget deficit and financial security were among the major topics covered. Also included were questions relevant to other social issues such as religion, education, racism and sexism. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1989
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1989 study was specifically designed to get an indication of public attitudes and perceptions of abuse of the elderly, problems of caregiving, subjective well-being, and other social issues and concerns. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1990
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1990 study was designed to get an indication of attitudes about abortion with relation to religious beliefs and other demographic variables. Topics of abuse and neglect of the elderly as well as political and religious ideology were also addressed. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1991
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1991 study assessed attitudes of people ages 60 and older on problems of abuse of the elderly, care giving, subjective well-being, medical care and other social issues and concerns. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1992
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1992 study was specifically designed to get an indication of voting patterns in relation to religious activities and other demographic variables. Topics of adoption, insurance and health care needs were also addressed. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1993
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1993 study was directed at a number of issues including religion, race relations, sexism, personal life satisfaction and political views. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1994
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1994 study was designed to assess the views and opinions of citizens on a number of issues that impact the community. In addition, the 1994 questionnaire focused on leisure activities and conservative religion. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1995
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The objective of the 1995 study was to assess the views and opinions of the citizens of Delaware County, Indiana who were age 60 and older. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1996
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1997. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1996 study was specifically designed to get an indication of voting patterns with relation to religious activities and other demographic variables. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1997
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1998. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1997 study was designed to assess beliefs with regard to terminal illness, health care and health insurance, religious beliefs and practices, and attitudes regarding local police practices. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1998
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 1998. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1998 study was designed to assess the nature of congregations, the "unchurched," and caregiving in "Middletown." [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 1999
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 2000 and every other year afterward. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 1999 study was designed to assess computer and internet use and adult caregiving responsibilities. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 2000
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 2000 and every other year afterward. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 2000 study was designed to assess attitudes about hate crimes, poverty, and gender and race discrimination. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 2002
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 2000 and every other year afterward. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 2002 study was designed to assess attitudes about the September 11 terrorist attacks and about Arabs. [See More...]

Middletown Area Study, 2004
Data for the Middletown Area Studies were collected every year from 1978 to 2000 and every other year afterward. The purpose of these studies was to assess the views and lifestyles of citizens on a diverse range of subjects. The major topics included questions on life satisfaction, education, income, family, religion, and politics. The 2004 study was designed to assess participation in political campaigns, the news resources used by participants, and attitudes about school voucher programs. [See More...]

              Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1988
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1989
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1990
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1991
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering such topics as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1992
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. The 1992 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest, including quality of life, work, health insurance, information-age technology, energy consumption, children and family, social issues, outdoor recreation and exercise, and food consumption. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1993
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. The 1993 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest, including quality of life, work, agriculture, outdoor recreation and exercise, historic preservation, alternative fuel, children and family, healthcare, crime, domestic violence, and alcoholism. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1994
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations.The 1994 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest including quality of life, work, religious affiliation, public health, federal assistance, political and civic engagement and opinion to death penalty. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1995
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations.The 1995 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest including quality of life, work, tourism, health care, doctor assisted suicide, outdoor recreation, nursing homes, insurance for long term care and retirement planing. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1997
This project aims to survey and monitor quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies, non-profits, educational and research organizations. The 1997 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest, including quality of life, work, fuel usage, nursing homes, communication technology, child care, flex time, outdoor recreation and exercise. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 1998
This project aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies and educational and research organizations. The 1998 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest including quality of life, work, fuel usage, nursing homes, communication technology, child care, flex time, outdoor recreation and exercise. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2000
This project aims to survey and monitor quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the housing, health, recreation, occupation, family life, crime, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. It is conducted by the Bureau of Sociological Research of the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in collaboration with state agencies, non-profits, educational and research organizations. The 2000 survey was conducted among residents of Nebraska on many topics of local and state interest including quality of life, recreation, healthcare, assisted living, employment, childcare, public policy, Nebraska roads, crime and human services system. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2001
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2001 NASIS asks questions about outdoor and recreational activities, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, household composition, job situation, the care in nursing homes/assisted living facilities, voting behavior and the Nebraska Department of Roads. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2003
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2003 NASIS asks questions about outdoor and recreational activities, the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, household composition, job situation, the care in nursing homes/assisted living facilities, voting behavior, and the Nebraska Department of Roads. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2004
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2004 NASIS asks questions about outdoor and recreational activities, environmental conservation issues, household composition, job situation, civic attitudes and behavior, mental health and attitudes toward criminal justice. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2005
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2005 NASIS asks questions about outdoor activities, employment, nursing homes, discrimination, and religion. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2007
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2007 NASIS asks questions about crime, fishing, healthcare, nursing homes, family services, and religion. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2008
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2008 NASIS asks questions about driving behavior, cell phone usage, disaster response, health, immigration, and religion. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2010
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2010 NASIS asks questions about current issues, nursing homes and assisted living facilities, personal finances, survey participation, as well as general demographic and household information. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2011
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2011 NASIS asks questions about water issues, life processes, crime and the criminal justice system, media and television, vacation and travel, physical and social environment, gender and parenthood, personal feelings, and household finances. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2012
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2011 NASIS asks questions about the Nebraska Department of Roads, trees and forests, water planning, wind energy, climate change, community trust, impressions about UNL, government policies, female sex offenders, personal finances, and mental health. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2013
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2013 NASIS asks questions about the Nebraska Department of Natural Resources, wind energy and wildlife, recycling, plant management in Nebraska, and politics and policies. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2014
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2014 NASIS asks questions about The Nebraska Department of Natural Resources, underage drinking, safety, vaccinations, the Affordable Care Act, and plant management in Nebraska. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2015
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2015 NASIS asks questions about crime, water quality, 4_H, youth and community, childcare, and gay and lesbian issues. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2016
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor change in quality of life. The survey covers topics including environment, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2016 NASIS more specifically gauges opinions about natural resources, youth and community, food and health, Eastern Redcedar, drug use, homelessness, engineering, gambling, and transportation. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2017
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor change in quality of life. The survey covers topics including environment, housing, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2017 NASIS gauges opinions about engineering, immigration, human rights, natural resources, youth and community, sex offenders, 4-H, youth and community. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2018
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor changes in quality of life. The survey covers topics including the environment, housing, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions is repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2018 NASIS asks questions about LGBT rights, 4-H, youth and media. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2019
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor changes in quality of life. The survey covers topics including the environment, housing, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions is repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2019 NASIS gauges opinions about news and public media, health, Medicaid and health care, alcohol opinions, climate change, water management, and immigration, among others. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2019 Winter
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor changes in quality of life. The survey covers topics including the environment, housing, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions is repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. This survey covers topics including food science, 3D printing, social networks, continuing education, behavioral health treatment and trust in institutions. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2020
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor changes in quality of life. The survey covers topics including the environment, housing, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions is repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2020 NASIS gauges opinions about food science, news media and Medicaid expansion, substance use and rail services among others. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2020 Winter
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) was conceived as a vehicle both for producing current, topical information about Nebraskans (age 19 and older) and also for monitoring change in quality of life. As in earlier surveys, 2020 Winter NASIS was a joint effort of the Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL) and a variety of university and public agencies. While the final responsibility for the design and fielding of the survey rests with the Bureau of Sociological Research (BOSR), both the costs of the survey and its planning have been shared with the Department of Sociology at UNL as well as the researchers involved, which typically include several state agencies, private non-profit agencies, and other university departments. [See More...]

Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2021
The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor changes in quality of life. The survey covers topics including the environment, housing, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions is repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. As in earlier surveys, 2021 NASIS was a joint effort of a variety of university and public agencies. The 2021 NASIS asks questions about COVID-19, alcohol and drug use, media usage, and child care, [See More...]

              Southern Focus Polls

Southern Focus Poll, Combined Sample, Spring 1998
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners. All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS). [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Combined Sample, Spring 1999
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, 1999
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1992
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1993
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1994
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1995
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1996
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1999
"Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll" (Odum Institute). [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1993
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1994
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1995
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1996
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1997
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1998
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 2000
"Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll" (Odum Institute). [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Fall 1995
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Spring 1995
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Spring 1996
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Spring 1997
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1992
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1993
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1994
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1995
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1996
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1999
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1992
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1993
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1994
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1995
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1996
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1997
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1998
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1999
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 2000
"Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll" (Odum Institute). [See More...]

Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 2001
Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. [See More...]

              Other Local/Regional Surveys

American Values Scale, 1985
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year, answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale, which is a modification of the Rokeach Values Survey. The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning "no importance at all" and 9 meaning "supreme importance to me." [See More...]

American Values Scale, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale which is modification of the Rokeach Values Survey. The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts in on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning "no importance at all" and 9 meaning "supreme importance to me." [See More...]

American Values Scale, 1987
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year, answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale, which is a modification of the Rokeach Values Survey. The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning "no importance at all" and 9 meaning "supreme importance to me." [See More...]

American Values Scale, 1988
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year, answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale, which is a modification of the Rokeach Values Survey. The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts in on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning "no importance at all" and 9 meaning "supreme importance to me." [See More...]

Census of the Amish in Holmes County and the Surrounding Areas
The Amish have largely remained an enigma to social science researchers, due to a lack of large-scale data. By coding data from directories of Amish in Holmes County, Ohio, and the surrounding areas (which contain information on roughly one in every six Amish in the world), this project provides a new source of data that allows people to explore demographics, occupational shifts, and retention among a significant proportion of the Old Order Amish. [See More...]

Christian Universities as Moral Communities - Drinking, Sex, and Drug use among University Students in the United States
The data set represents responses to 120 questions regarding religious belief, religious practice, religious context, and social behavior, e.g., drinking, sex, drugs, worship, prayer, religious beliefs, Christian fundamentalism, health, well-being, tattoos, piercings. Data were gathered from respondents at 12 American colleges and universities. Six of these were large public schools; three were secular private schools; three were explicitly Christian and affiliated with conservative denominations. One public and one private school were geographically paired (less than 300 miles apart). These pairs were located in the US Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Midsouth, Northwest, and Southwest. [See More...]

Detroit Area Study, 1958 - The Religious Factor
The Detroit Area Study (DAS) was established at the University of Michigan in 1951 primarily to provide practical social research training for graduate students. In addition, the Detroit Area Study was intended to serve as a resource for basic research and to provide reliable data on the Greater Detroit community. Surveys have been conducted annually since 1951-52 on a variety of subjects. The specific problems that DAS investigates each year are selected by the DAS Executive Committee after reviewing research proposals submitted by interested faculty members. [See More...]

Detroit Area Study, 1971 - Social Problems and Social Change in Detroit
The study was conducted during the spring and summer of 1971. The aim of the 1971 Detroit Area Study was to gather information on social change in the Detroit area by replicating items from nine earlier Detroit Area Studies that were conducted in 1953-1959, 1968 and 1969. The criteria used for selecting the question items were that they: (1) not be dated by wording or subject matter, (2) be relevant to some problem of current public concern or a continuing issue of sociological theory, and (3) be of the type that would be manageable in a long interview on diverse subjects. The questions chosen to be included in the 1971 Detroit Area Study examined issues such as values in marriage, ideal number of children, satisfaction of wives with marriage, decision-making and division of labor within a marriage, attitudes toward women and work, child-rearing, social participation, religious participation and beliefs, moral and job values, political orientation and participation, evaluation of various institutions and racial attitudes. In addition to the items replicated from the previous studies, respondents' attitudes toward the United States sending troops to Vietnam were explored. Background variables established respondents' age, sex, race, educational level, marital status, occupation, class identification and relationship to head of household. Demographic information also was collected on the respondent's spouse and parents. [See More...]

Detroit Area Study, 1997 - Social Change in Religion and Child Rearing
Respondents from three counties in the Detroit area were queried about their work, health, marriage and family, finances, political views, religion and child rearing. With respect to finances, respondent views were asked about credit card purchases, recording expenditures and investments. Regarding political views, respondents were questioned about political preferences, presidential values, freedom of speech, nuclear war and the interest of public officials. Questions also addressed religious beliefs and experiences, including the religiosity of respondents' parents, belief in and relationship with God, the relationship between science and religion, school prayer, divorce, homosexuality, interfaith marriages, religion of friends and observance of religious holy days. Questions were asked about the views of respondents' religious leaders on issues including drinking, abortion, and test-tube fertilization. Regarding child rearing, questions were asked pertaining to religious training given to child(ren) and frequency of prayer before meals. Background information includes marital status, employment, political orientation and income. [See More...]

Dimensions of Religiosity, 1985
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966). [See More...]

Dimensions of Religiosity, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966). [See More...]

Dimensions of Religiosity, 1987
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966). [See More...]

Dimensions of Religiosity, 1988
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966). [See More...]

Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. The Dimensions of Religious Commitment is a questionnaire designed to measure four dimensions of religiosity (Glock and Stark, 1965): Belief, Ritual, Experience, and Knowledge. Originally, Glock and Stark proposed five dimensions, which include "Consequences" as the fifth dimension. However, the authors did not generate measures for this last dimension. Their analysis of the first four dimensions showed that these dimensions are essentially uncorrelated, and that other attitudes and behavior can be predicted from positions on these dimensions. Furthermore, the authors had constructed indices of the four dimensions, mainly by summing points assigned to each item that was answered in a certain direction. Among these indices, the orthodoxy index was found to be the best predictor of all other aspects of religiosity, implying that belief is the most significant component of religiosity. The entire Glock and Stark questionnaire contained more than 500 items. The interested reader may consult the published analysis. [See More...]

Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1987
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. The Dimensions of Religious Commitment is a questionnaire designed to measure four dimensions of religiosity (Glock and Stark, 1965): Belief, Ritual, Experience, and Knowledge. Originally, Glock and Stark proposed five dimensions, which include "Consequences" as the fifth dimension. However, the authors did not generate measures for this last dimension. Their analysis of the first four dimensions showed that these dimensions are essentially uncorrelated, and that other attitudes and behavior can be predicted from positions on these dimensions. Furthermore, the authors had constructed indices of the four dimensions, mainly by summing points assigned to each item that was answered in a certain direction. Among these indices, the orthodoxy index was found to be the best predictor of all other aspects of religiosity, implying that belief is the most significant component of religiosity. The entire Glock and Stark questionnaire contained more than 500 items. The interested reader may consult the published analysis. [See More...]

Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1988
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Dimensions of Religious Commitment. Additional modules are available for free download through the Odum Institute's electronic archive. [See More...]

Faith and Community Survey of Four Indianapolis Neighborhoods, 1997
The purpose of the study was twofold. First, the study was designed to collect basic descriptive data regarding the characteristics, attitudes, religious beliefs and practices, and social contacts of people who lived in the four study neighborhoods in Indianapolis. Second, the study was designed to become part of a quantitative database that would provide another means to explore how religious involvement influences individual attitudes about and involvement in neighborhood activities. [See More...]

Harris 1969 New York City Racial and Religious Survey, No. 1925, Blacks
This study commissioned by the Ford Foundation, studied black-Jewish relations in New York City to determine points of contact between the groups and delineate current and future conflict areas. Attitudes underlying conflict or cooperation as well as perceptions of non-black, non-Jewish population were also examined. Questions were asked in the areas of race relations, discrimination, alienation, community relations, anti-Semitism, integration, religion, violence, and black and Jewish relations. This survey is related to the HAR69JEW (Jewish sample) and the HAR69NJW (sample consisting of only non-Jewish-whites). [See More...]

Harris 1969 New York City Racial and Religious Survey, No. 1925, Jewish
This study commissioned by the Ford Foundation, studies black-Jewish relations in New York City to determine points of contact between the groups and delineate current and future conflict areas. Attitudes underlying conflict or cooperation as well as perceptions of non-black, non-Jewish population are also examined. Questions were asked in the areas of race relations, discrimination, alienation, community relations, anti-Semitism, integration, religion, violence, and black and Jewish relations. The HAR69JEW is the sample consisting of only of those who identified their religion as Jewish. This survey is related to the HAR69BLK (black sample) and the HAR69NJW (non-Jewish-white sample). [See More...]

Harris 1969 New York City Racial and Religious Survey, No. 1925, Non-Jewish-White
This study commissioned by the Ford Foundation, studied black-Jewish relations in New York City to determine points of contact between the groups and delineate current and future conflict areas. Attitudes underlying conflict or cooperation as well as perceptions of non-black, non-Jewish population were are also examined. Questions were asked in the areas of race relations, discrimination, alienation, community relations, anti-Semitism, integration, religion, violence, and black and Jewish relations. The HAR69NJW is the sample consisting of only non-Jewish-whites. This survey is related to the HAR69BLK (black sample) and the HAR69JEW (Jewish sample). [See More...]

Houston Area Survey, 1982-2010
For the past 28 years, these countywide, random-digit-dialed, computer-assisted telephone surveys have systematically measured the continuities and changes in demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes and beliefs among successive representative samples of Harris County residents. Using identical items across the years, with new questions added periodically, the annual Houston Area Survey (HAS) has tracked America's fourth largest city in the process of fundamental transformation. [See More...]

Houston Area Survey, 2010
For the past 28 years, these countywide, random-digit-dialed, computer-assisted telephone surveys systematically measured the continuities and changes in demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes and beliefs among successive representative samples of Harris County residents. Using identical items across the years, with new questions added periodically, the annual Houston Area Survey (HAS) has tracked America's fourth largest city in the process of fundamental transformation. [See More...]

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1971
The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their sixties), middle-aged parents (then in their early forties), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file only contains the first wave in 1971. [See More...]

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1985
"The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 2, 1985, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations. [See More...]

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1988
"The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 3, 1988, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations. [See More...]

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1994
"The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 5, 1994, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations. [See More...]

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1997
The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 6, 1997, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations. [See More...]

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 2000
The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 7, 2000, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations. [See More...]

Longitudinal Study of Generations, 2005
The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 8, 2005, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations. Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction. [See More...]

New York Religion 1855-1865
The 1855 and 1865 New York state censuses include a wide range of social, political and economic indicators for every town and city in the state of New York (a total of 942 "places" in 1865 and 918 in 1855). Included in the social indicators were data on all 53 active denominations in 1865 and 42 denominations in 1855. This file includes selected social and demographic indicators, and a measure of church attendance for all denominations in 1855 and 1865. The data contained in this file include only a small portion of the New York censuses. State censuses were also conducted in 1845 and 1875. [See More...]

Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey - Arkansas Sample
The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents' views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants' influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress' ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn. [See More...]

Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey - Ohio Sample
The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents' views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants' influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress' ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn. [See More...]

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales -Paper and Pencil Version, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation. [See More...]

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales -Respondents' Same-Sex Friends, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation. [See More...]

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation. [See More...]

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1987
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation. [See More...]

Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1988
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation. [See More...]

Religious Behaviors Questionnaire, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. [See More...]

Religious Behaviors Questionnaire, 1987
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. [See More...]

Religious Behaviors Questionnaire, 1988
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. [See More...]

Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, which measures religious fundamentalism among Christians- a construct similar to "orthodoxy" as conceived by some other researchers. [See More...]

Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1987
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, which measures religious fundamentalism among Christians - a construct similar to "orthodoxy" as conceived by some other researchers. [See More...]

Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1988
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, which measures religious fundamentalism among Christians- a construct similar to "orthodoxy" as conceived by some other researchers. [See More...]

Religious Identity and Influence Survey, 1996
The Religious Identity and Influence Survey was fielded in 1996 under the direction of Dr. Christian Smith of the Department of Sociology at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, with the assistance of David Sikkink, then PhD graduate student in Smith's department. The survey focused on the "commitments, beliefs, concerns, and practices" of evangelicals and other church-going Protestants, as well as how they viewed the relationship between Christians and the educational, political, and other institutions within American society (Smith et al. 1998). Details on the survey research methods are published as Appendices A, B, and D in Christian Smith et al., 1998, American Evangelicalism: Embattled and Thriving, Chicago: University of Chicago Press. Users must be extremely careful to use appropriate weights (described below) in their analyses. [See More...]

Religious Life Inventory, 1986
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religion Life Inventory, which consists of three scales: External, Internal, and Interactional. Additional information about the survey can be found at the Odum Institute's electronic archive. [See More...]

Religious Life Inventory, 1987
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religion Life Inventory, which consists of three scales: External, Internal, and Interactional. Additional information about the survey can be found in the Odum Institute's electronic archive. [See More...]

Religious Life Inventory, 1988
The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religion Life Inventory, which consists of three scales: External, Internal, and Interactional. Additional information about the survey can be found in the Odum Institute's electronic archive. [See More...]

Salt Lake City and San Francisco Surveys of Mormons, 1967-1969 (Salt Lake City Sample)
These are the first large-scale surveys of Mormons ever conducted, with or without church auspices, based upon probability samples of adult Mormon householders. As of century's end, these are the only such surveys available to the public, although the LDS Church has in recent years conducted many private surveys of its own for various purposes. Large as they are, the Mauss surveys cannot be considered representative of all Mormons everywhere, of course, even in the 1960s, but they are certainly representative of Salt Lake City Mormons then, as well as of the most highly urbanized San Francisco Mormons (and, by extension, perhaps of Mormons in similar sections of other American cities). [See More...]

Salt Lake City and San Francisco Surveys of Mormons, 1967-1969 (San Francisco Sample)
These are the first large-scale surveys of Mormons ever conducted, with or without church auspices, based upon probability samples of adult Mormon householders. As of century's end, these are the only such surveys available to the public, although the LDS Church has in recent years conducted many private surveys of its own for various purposes. Large as they are, the Mauss surveys cannot be considered representative of all Mormons everywhere, of course, even in the 1960s, but they are certainly representative of Salt Lake City Mormons then, as well as of the most highly urbanized San Francisco Mormons (and, by extension, perhaps of Mormons in similar sections of other American cities). [See More...]

Six-Cities Study of Trustees
The Six Cities Study, collected by researchers at Yale University's Program on Nonprofit Organizations (PONPO), focuses on members of ninety nonprofit boards of trustees in six cities (Atlanta, Boston, Cleveland, Los Angeles, Minneapolis/St. Paul, and Philadelphia). The study examines a variety of variables, including the gender, race, religion, and socioeconomic makeup of trustees, at 30-year intervals in 1931, 1961, and 1991. [See More...]

Survey of Chicago Catholics, 2007
This 2007 telephone survey examined the attitudes of 524 former and current Catholics living in the Chicago Archdiocese, which encompasses Cook and Lake counties and is home to 2.5 million Catholics. Current Catholics were asked a wide range of questions about their views of the church, as well as aspects of Catholic identity and commitment. Former Catholics were asked about reasons for leaving the church. [See More...]

Survey of Northern California Church Bodies, 1963
This study sought to answer three fundamental questions about religious commitment: What is the nature of religious commitment? What are the social and psychological sources of religious commitment? What are the social and psychological consequences of religious commitment? (Stark, Rodney and Charles Y. Glock,1968, p. 2-3). [See More...]

Survey of Religion and Community Life in Indianapolis, 1999
Purpose of the study was twofold. First, the study was designed to collect descriptive data regarding the characteristics, attitudes, and religious beliefs and practices of Marion County residents to use as baseline measure, based on a random sample of Indianapolis residents for comparing quantitative data collected from 17 city neighborhoods as a part of the Religion and Urban Culture Project at the Polis Center. Second, the study was designed to become part of the Project's quantitative database that would provide another database for exploring Indianapolis residents' feelings about the role that religious groups and leaders play in shaping the community dynamics of Indianapolis. [See More...]

Survey of Texas Adults, 2004
This data set is aimed at learning more about the lives of Texas adults. Specifically, the data set contains information on seven major aspects of Texans' lives: civic engagement and attitudes; volunteering; organizational memberships and giving behaviors; personality; physical and mental health; health behaviors; religious activities and beliefs. The dataset also includes information about respondents' demographic characteristics. [See More...]

The Comparative Study of Religious Experience in Taiwan
The Comparative Study of Religious Experience in Taiwan was conducted by the Graduate Institute of Religious Studies at National Chengchi University in Taipei, Taiwan, under Yen-zen Tsai. It was funded by the Taiwan National Science Council. The survey includes questions about experiencing extraordinary powers, experiences initiating a new understanding of life, dreams, mysterious feelings and visions, conception and behavior, ideas and beliefs, and personal details. Further information can be obtained from the Survey Research Data Archive. [See More...]

The Gravestone Index
This file is a record of the religious and secular information found on headstones and tombstones in the United States, Canada, Britain, and Australia. The death dates on the grave markers cover the period from the early 19th century to the early 21st century. Also included is a record of carvings, statues, and other objects connected to the front or back of the grave markers. [See More...]

Tulsa Oklahoma Area Science and Technology Survey, 1981
This survey is part of an investigation of the nature of public attitudes toward science and technology. Religiosity, educational and occupational background, political attitudes and opinions and attitudes about a variety of scientific topics are topics covered in the questionnaire. Data collection was carried out by senior mass communication and sociology majors under the supervision of the principal investigators. [See More...]

Tulsa, Oklahoma Area Survey, 1985
This survey was the first of two Tulsa area studies generally modeled on the Oklahoma City studies undertaken by the University of Oklahoma. Tulsa area residents were asked about a wide range of local and national issues with additional questions covering religious preference, educational and occupational background, and political attitudes and opinions. [See More...]

Tulsa, Oklahoma Area Survey, 1986
This survey was the second of two Tulsa area studies generally modeled on the Oklahoma City studies undertaken by the University of Oklahoma. Tulsa area residents were asked about a wide range of local and national issues with additional questions covering religious preference, educational and occupational background, and political attitudes and opinions. [See More...]

Winthrop University Student Religion Survey, 1996
This study was designed by the principal investigator and his students in an upper-division sociology of religion course. The survey items were formulated around key issues in class and administered to Winthrop University students in General Education classes. The topics covered include religious background and behavior, spiritual beliefs, and attitudes toward deviant religious groups. [See More...]

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