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Campaign 2000 Typology Survey

DOI

10.17605/OSF.IO/TZ37R

Summary

The Campaign 2000 Typology Survey investigated Americans' opinions on a variety of topics, including the 2000 Presidential election and candidates, the major political parties, and various social groups. The survey also included a rich set of questions on religion and politics, covering topics such as whether churches and clergy should express political views and whether religious groups should receive government funding to provide social services. The data set features a 10-group Political Typology (variable 160) which sorts respondents into homogeneous groups based on their values, political beliefs, and party affiliation.

The ARDA has added six additional variables to the original data set to enhance the users' experience on our site.

Data File

Cases: 2799
Variables: 160
Weight Variable: WEIGHT

Data Collection

August 24 - September 10, 2000

Funded By

The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press

Collection Procedures

From the Pew Website: "Results for the Campaign 2000 Typology Survey are based on telephone interviews conducted under the direction of Princeton Survey Research Associates among a nationwide sample of 2,799 adults (1,999 registered voters), 18 years of age or older, during the period August 24 - September 10, 2000. For results based on the total sample, one can say with 95% confidence that the error attributable to sampling and other random effects is plus or minus 2 percentage points. For results based on registered voters, the sampling error is plus or minus 2.5 percentage points. For results based on likely voters (N=1495), the sampling error is plus or minus 3 percentage points. For results based on either Form 1 (N=1025) or Form 2 (N=974) registered voters, the sampling error is plus or minus 3.5 percentage points.

"In addition to sampling error, one should bear in mind that question wording and practical difficulties in conducting surveys can introduce error or bias into the findings of opinion polls."

Principal Investigators

The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press

Related Publications

The Pew Research Center for the People and the Press Survey Report: "Religion and Politics: The Ambivalent Majority" released September 20, 2000

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