Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Attending substance abuse groups and identifying as spiritual but not religious.
    McClure, Paul K., and Lindsay R. Wilkinson (2020)
    Review of Religious Research 62:2: 197-218.

    Uses longitudinal data; finds that those who have attended substance abuse groups such as Alcoholics Anonymous are more likely to identify as spiritual but not religious, as opposed to religious or religious and spiritual.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Alcoholics Anonymous; Drug; Spirituality
  • Religious context matters: Exploring the relationship between religious context and underage alcohol consumption.
    Nie, Fanhao, Xiaozhao Yousef Yang, and Daniel V.A. Olson (2018)
    Review of Religious Research 60:2: 199-222.

    Analyzes 2003 & '05 National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.), U.S. Census, & Religious congregations and Membership Study data. Higher percentages of conservative Protestants & Catholics in county populations predicted higher rates of adolescent drunkenness.

    Associated Search Terms: Evangelical, U.S.A.; Contextual effects; Conservative, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.; Alcohol; Adolescents
  • Religion as a social control: A longitudinal study of religious involvement and substance use.
    Guo, Siying , and Christi Metcalfe (2018)
    Crime and Delinquency 65(8): 1149–1181.

    Increases in religious attendance are associated with reduced odds of all forms of substance use. In addition, the religious attendance–substance use relationship becomes weaker with age. Overall, religious attendance has a similar relationship with substance use among males & females, as well as Whites & non-Whites, with a few notable exceptions.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Drug; Marijuana; Young adults; Practice
  • Religiosity, marijuana use, and binge drinking: A test of the moral community hypothesis.
    Rivera, Craig J., Timothy R. Lauger, and Michael A. Cretacci (2018)
    Sociology of Religion 79:3: 356-378.

    Analyzes 2007-08 National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.) data. Integration into a micro moral community strengthens the inverse association of religiosity with binge drinking & marijuana use.

    Associated Search Terms: Young adults; Religiosity; Network; Marijuana; Moral community; Contextual effects; Alcohol; Adolescents; Deviance/social control
  • The perceived role of Islamic religiosity in minorities' educational success in Belgium. A cure or curse?
    Van Praag, Lore, Orhan Agirdag, Peer Aj Sevens, and Mieke van Houte (2016)
    Social Compass 63:4: 529-546.

    Based on 2009-11 interviews with Muslim students in 3 secondary schools in Flanders. They cited skill of memorization, friendship networks, and avoidance of drugs and alcohol as helpful in school.

    Associated Search Terms: Students, secondary; Belgium; Islam, Belgium; Assimilation; Education
  • Longitudinal associations among religiousness, delay discounting, and substance use initiation in early adolescence.
    Kim-spoon, Jungmeen, Michael E. McCullough, Warren K. Bickel, Julee P. Farley, and Gregory S. Longo (2015)
    Journal of Research on Adolescence 25:1: 36-43.

    The sample comprised 106 early adolescents (10-13 years of age, 52% female) who were not using substances at Time 1. High levels of personal religiousness at Time 1 were related to low levels of substance use (alcohol, cigarette, & marijuana) at Time 2 (2.4 years later), mediated by low levels of delay discounting (devaluation of a reward because of its being possessed).

    Associated Search Terms: Tobacco; Adolescents; Alcohol; Marijuana; Panel study
  • Heavy episodic drinking and sexual aggression among male college students: The protective influence of church attendance.
    Kingree, Jeffrey B., Martie Thompson, and Emily Ruetz (2015)
    Journal of Interpersonal Violence 32:4: 1-17.

    The sample comprised 106 early adolescents (10-13 years of age, 52% female) who were not using substances at Time 1. High levels of personal religiousness at Time 1 were related to low levels of substance use (alcohol, cigarette, & marijuana) at Time 2 (2.4 years later), mediated by low levels of delay discounting (devaluation of a reward because of its being possessed).


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Practice; Sexual assault; Students, undergraduate
  • The effects of belonging to an alcohol-proscribing religious group on the relationship between moderate alcohol consumption and mortality.
    David, Hayward R., and Neal Krause (2014)
    Social Science and Medicine 101: 1-8.

    Moderate alcohol consumption (2 drinks or fewer per day on average) was related with lower mortality compared with both total abstention from alcohol & heavy consumption (more than 2 drinks per day) among participants who did not belong to an alcohol-proscribing group. By contrast, moderate drinkers who belonged to alcohol-proscribing groups had higher mortality risk compared with non-drinkers.

    Associated Search Terms: Mortality; Alcohol
  • Desacralizing salvation in straight edge Christianity and holistic spirituality.
    Abraham, Ibrahim, and Francis Stewart (2014)
    International Journal for the Study of New Religions 5:1: 77-102.

    Examines Christianity & holistic spirituality within punk’s Straight Edge subculture, a movement rejecting alcohol, drugs, & casual sex. Straight Edge Christianity illustrates the emergence of religion in secular cultural spaces, while its holistic spirituality illustrates a movement away from the transcendent & supernatural, towards salvation within material concerns & therapeutic practices.

    Associated Search Terms: Sacralization; Popular culture; Music
  • Indigenous supports for recovery from alcoholism and drug abuse: The Native American Church.
    Prue, Bob (2013)
    Journal of Ethnic and Culural Diversity in Social Work 22:3/4: 271-287.

    Examines Christianity & holistic spirituality within punk’s Straight Edge subculture, a movement rejecting alcohol, drugs, & casual sex. Straight Edge Christianity illustrates the emergence of religion in secular cultural spaces, while its holistic spirituality illustrates a movement away from the transcendent & supernatural, towards salvation within material concerns & therapeutic practices.


    Associated Search Terms: Native American Church; Native Americans; Alcohol; Drug
  • Religion and selected health behaviors among Latinos in Texas.
    Garcia, Ginny, Christopher G. Ellison, Thankam S. Sunil, and Terrence D. Hill (2013)
    Journal of Religion and Health 52:1: 18-31.

    Clear distinctions emerge on the basis of both denomination and frequency of attendance. Specifically, Protestants who regularly attend religious services are significantly more likely to be abstainers and to have never smoked, while those with no religious affiliation exhibit relatively unfavorable risk profiles.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Latino Americans; United States, Texas; Alcohol; Practice; Protestant, U.S.A.; Tobacco
  • Extracurricular activities and teens' alcohol use: The role of religious and secualar sponsorship.
    Adamczyk, Amy (2012)
    Social Science Research 41: 412-424.

    Uses 2 waves of data from the National Study of Youth and Religion; involvement in religion-supported secular activities is associated with less alcohol use by involved teens. The number of friends who belong to a religious youth group, in part, explains the relationship. Network overlap between parents & teens, number of friends who drink or use drugs, & having an adult confidant from a religious group do not mediate the relationship.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Alcohol
  • Spirituality and religion: Intertwined protective factors for substance use among urban American Indian youth.
    Kulis, Stephen, David R. Hodge, Stephanie L. Ayers, Eddie F. Brown, and Flavio F. Marsiglia (2012)
    American Journal of Drug and Alcohol Abuse 38:5: 444-449.

    Uses 2 waves of data from the National Study of Youth and Religion; involvement in religion-supported secular activities is associated with less alcohol use by involved teens. The number of friends who belong to a religious youth group, in part, explains the relationship. Network overlap between parents & teens, number of friends who drink or use drugs, & having an adult confidant from a religious group do not mediate the relationship.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Drug; Native Americans; Spirituality; Youth
  • The effect of religion-supported programs on health-related behaviors in adolescence.
    Adamczyk, Amy, and Jacob Felson (2012)
    Review of Religious Research 54:4: 469-497.

    Analyzes 2002-05 telephone interview data from U.S.A. teenagers. Involvement in religiously-sponsored non-religious activities is related to more positive outcomes, compared to participation in similar non-religiously sponsored activities.

    Associated Search Terms: Well-being; Sexual activity; Health; Alcohol; Adolescents
  • Religiosity and adolescent substance use: Evidence from the National Survey on Drug Use and Health.
    Ford, Jason A., and Terrence D. Hill (2012)
    Substance Use & Misues 47:7: 787-798.

    Religiosity reduces the odds of tobacco use, heavy drinking, prescription drug misuse, marijuana use, & other illicit drug use. These associations are partially explained by respondent & peer attitudes toward substance use &, to a lesser extent, respondent psychological well-being.

    Associated Search Terms: Well-being, psychological; Religiosity; Tobacco; Marijuana; Alcohol; Drug; Adolescents
  • Maternal religious attendance and low birth weight.
    Burdette, Amy M., Janet Weeks, Terrence D. Hill, and Isaac W. Eberstein (2012)
    Social Science & Medicine 74:12: 1961-1967.

    Maternal religious attendance is protective against low birth weight. Religious attendance is also associated with lower odds of cigarette use & poor nutrition, but is unrelated to mental health, alcohol use, illicit drug use, & prenatal care.

    Associated Search Terms: Health; Practice; Women
  • Religiosity, peers, and delinquency: Does religiosity reduce the effect of peers on delinquency?
    Desmond, Scott A., Sarah E. Soper, and Rachel Kraus (2011)
    Sociological Spectrum 31: 665-694.

    For marijuana & alcohol use, 3 measures of peer influence—peer attitudes, behaviors, & pressure—have weaker effects on religious adolescents. In contrast, religiosity does not seem to condition the effect of peers on hitting & property offenses.

    Associated Search Terms: Marijuana; Alcohol; Adolescents; Delinquency; Peers; Religiosity
  • Religious Involvement and Latino Immigrant Health.
    Shapiro, Ephraim (2011)
    In Anthony J. Blasi (ed.) Toward a Sociological Theory of Religion and Health. Leiden: Brill, pp. 175-205.

    Analyzes 1st wave data (2003) from the New Immigrant Survey, from first generation adult immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, & Guatemala who self-identify as Christians. Attendance predicted favorable results for health behaviors (smoking, binge drinking, physical activity) but was unrelated to obesity.

    Associated Search Terms: Social capital; Migrant; Latino Americans; Smoking; Alcohol; Health
  • Religiosity as a protective factor against heavy episodic drinking (HED) in heterosexual, bisexual, gay, and lesbian young adults.
    Rostosky, Sharon Scales, Fred Danner, and Ellen D.B. Riggle (2010)
    Journal of Homosexuality 57:8: 1039-1050.

    Analyzes 1st wave data (2003) from the New Immigrant Survey, from first generation adult immigrants from Mexico, El Salvador, & Guatemala who self-identify as Christians. Attendance predicted favorable results for health behaviors (smoking, binge drinking, physical activity) but was unrelated to obesity.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Homosexuality
  • Gender, Marital Status, and Alcohol Behavior: The Neglected Role of Religion.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Jennifer B. Barrett, and Benjamin E. Moulton (2008)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 47:4: 660-677.

    Analyzes 1977-94 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data; conservtive religion rather than marital status itself explains much of the relationship between marital status & less alcohol use.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Conservative, U.S.A.; Alcohol
  • Religion and alcohol use among college students: Exploring the role of domain-specific religious salience.
    Ellison, Christopher G., Matt Bradshaw, Sunshine Rote, Jennifer Storch, and Marcie Trevino (2008)
    Journal of Drug Issues 38:3: 821-846.

    Develops measures of domain-specific religious salience, exploring links with frequency of alcohol use in a diverse sample of college students. Results confirm the importance of domain-specific religious salience in shaping alcohol choices, but at the same time, also show that overall levels of such salience in the sample are low, indicating that other influences (e.g., peers, parents) are also important. The effects of other religious variables are largely indirect, serving primarily to heighten the salience of religious convictions.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Students, undergraduate; Salience
  • The Education-Contingent Association between Religiosity and Health: The Differential Effects of Self-Esteem and the Sense of Mastery.
    Schieman, Scott (2008)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 47:4: 710-724.

    Analyzes 1990-91 interview data from Toronto residents aged 18-55 who were fluent in English; the association between religiosity & mental health is enhanced by education & self-esteem but lessened by a sense of mastery.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Health; Depression; Mental health; Canada, Ontario, Toronto; Alcohol
  • A systematic review of recent literature on religiosity and substance use.
    Chitwood, Dale D., Michael L. Weiss, and Carl G. Leukefeld (2008)
    Journal of Drug Issues 38: 653-668.

    Reviews articles on the relationship of religiosity/spirituality with alcohol & drug use that were published between 1997 & 2006. Summaries of methodological characteristics (e.g., study design, sample size & composition, specific dimensions of religiosity, & substances investigated) & general findings of 105 studies provide an overview of the field. The association of religiosity/spirituality with reduced risk of substance use is well established, but a well defined body of knowledge on this relationship has been slow to emerge.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug
  • Religion and Alcohol in the U.S. National Alcohol Survey: How Important is Religion for Abstention and Drinking?
    Michalak, Laurence, Karen Trocki, and Jason Bond (2007)
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence 87: 268-280.

    Reviews articles on the relationship of religiosity/spirituality with alcohol & drug use that were published between 1997 & 2006. Summaries of methodological characteristics (e.g., study design, sample size & composition, specific dimensions of religiosity, & substances investigated) & general findings of 105 studies provide an overview of the field. The association of religiosity/spirituality with reduced risk of substance use is well established, but a well defined body of knowledge on this relationship has been slow to emerge.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Temperance; United States
  • Is religiosity a protective factor against substance use in young adulthood? Only if you're straight!
    Rostosky, Sharon Scales, Fred Danner, and Ellen D.B. Riggle (2007)
    Journal of Adolescent Health 40:: 440-447.

    Reviews articles on the relationship of religiosity/spirituality with alcohol & drug use that were published between 1997 & 2006. Summaries of methodological characteristics (e.g., study design, sample size & composition, specific dimensions of religiosity, & substances investigated) & general findings of 105 studies provide an overview of the field. The association of religiosity/spirituality with reduced risk of substance use is well established, but a well defined body of knowledge on this relationship has been slow to emerge.



    Associated Search Terms: Homosexuality; Tobacco; Young adults; Alcohol; Drug
  • Reason to Believe: Cultural Agency in Latin American Evangelicalism.
    Smilde, David (2007)
    Berkeley: University of California Press.

    Focuses on male Evangelicals in Venezuela.

    Associated Search Terms: Participant observation; Gender; Venezuela; Alcohol; Evangelical, Venezuela
  • Spirituality/religiosity promote acceptance based responding and 12-step involvement.
    Carrico, Adam W., Elizabeth V. Gifford, and Rudolf H. Moos (2007)
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence 89:1: 66-73.

    Spirituality/religion promotes the use of post-treatment self-regulation skills that, in turn, directly contribute to ongoing 12-step self-help group involvement.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug; Religiosity; Spirituality
  • Some Implications of Denominational Heterogeneity and Church Attendance for Alcohol Consumption among Hispanics.
    Ford, Julie M. (2006)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 45:2: 253-267.

    Analyzes 1995-99 telephone survey data; anti-alcohol use norms are salient for men.

    Associated Search Terms: Denomination (organizational entity); Alcohol; Sex; Latino Americans
  • Religious Affiliation and Alcohol Consumption in the United States.
    Holt, James B., Jacqueline W. Miller, Timothy S. Naimi, and Daniel Z. Sui. (2006)
    Geographical Review 96:4: 523-542.

    Analyzes 1995-99 telephone survey data; anti-alcohol use norms are salient for men.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Denomination (organizational entity)
  • Christian Religiosity, Self-control and Social Conformity.
    Welch, Michael R., Charles R. Tittle, and Harold G. Grasmick (2006)
    Social Forces 84:3: 1605-1623.

    Analyzes 1994 survey data from Oklahoma City; religiosity contributes to conformity to norms independently of personal self-control.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Religiosity; Deviance/social control
  • Adolescent Delinquency.
    Regnerus, Mark D. (2006)
    In Helen Rose Fuchs Ebaugh (ed.) Handbook of Religion and Social Institutions. New York: Springer, pp. 265-282.

    Analyzes 1994 survey data from Oklahoma City; religiosity contributes to conformity to norms independently of personal self-control.


    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Delinquency; Deviance/social control; Alcohol; Tobacco; Drug
  • Spirituality and Religion in Patients with HIV/AIDS.
    Cotton, Sian, Christina M. Puchalski, Susan N. Sherman, Joseph Mrus, Amy Pterman, Judith Feinberg, Kenneth I Pargament, Amy C. Justice, Anthony C. Leonard, and Joel Tsevat (2006)
    Journal of General Internal Medicine 21 (Supplement 5): S5-S13.

    Most patients with HIV/AIDS belonged to an organized religion & use their religion to cope with their illness. Patients with greater optimism, greater self-esteem, greater life satisfaction, minorities, & patients who drink less alcohol tend to be both more spiritual & religious.

    Associated Search Terms: AIDS; Health
  • Familial and Religious Influences on Adolescent Alcohol Use: A Multi-Level Study of Students and School Communities.
    Bjarnason, Thoroddur, Thorolfur Thorlindsson, Inga D. Sigfusdottir, and Michael R. Welch (2005)
    Social Forces 84:1: 375-390.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from Icelandic 10th grade (15-16 year old) secondary school students; religious participation inversely predicts alcohol use, while schools with more religiously practicing parents inversely predicted girls' alcohol use.

    Associated Search Terms: Students, secondary; Alcohol; Iceland; Socialization
  • Faster Horses, Older Whiskey, and More Money: An Analysis of Religious Influence on Referenda Voting.
    Satterthwaite, Shad (2005)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 44:1: 105-112.

    Analyzes county-level ecological referenda data from Oklahoma.

    Associated Search Terms: Gambling; Alcohol; United States, Oklahoma; Politics, U.S.A.; Moral; Ecology
  • Religion and Alcohol Use among African-American and Hispanic Inner-city Emergency Care Patients.
    Bazargan Shahrzad, Darren E. Sherkat, and Mohsen Bazargan (2004)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 43:3: 419-428.

    Analyzes 2001 data from hospital emergency room patients in Los Angeles. Religious practice reduces alcohol use while religious coping styles, religiosity, and spirituality have no effect on alcohol use or abuse.

    Associated Search Terms: Latino Americans; African Americans; Medical; Coping; United States, California; United States, California, Los Angeles; Alcohol
  • Festa da Alma Milagrosa, simbolismo de um ritual de aflição.
    Ferreti, Sérgio F. (2004)
    Ciências sociais e religião/Ciencias sociales y religión 6:6: 135-152.

    This ritual existed in the countryside of Maranhão for 40 years until the death of its organizer. It boasted fires, recitals, candles, cachaça (Brazilian alcoholic drink made from rice), & tambor (drum) dances; it took place in front of the tomb of the Miraculous Soul. It revealed a syncretism with beliefs of popular Catholicism, folklore, & the power of souls. The rituals of affliction helped those who believed that they had been affected by illness, unhappiness, ancestral spirits, magicians, or wizards.

    Associated Search Terms: Brazil, Maranão State; Suffering; Ritual; Symbol; Feast
  • The influence of race and religion on abstinence from alcohol, cigarettes and marijuana among adolescents.
    Wallace, John M., Jr., Tony N. Brown, Jerald G. Bahman, and Thomas A. Laveist (2003)
    Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs 64: 843-848.

    This ritual existed in the countryside of Maranhão for 40 years until the death of its organizer. It boasted fires, recitals, candles, cachaça (Brazilian alcoholic drink made from rice), & tambor (drum) dances; it took place in front of the tomb of the Miraculous Soul. It revealed a syncretism with beliefs of popular Catholicism, folklore, & the power of souls. The rituals of affliction helped those who believed that they had been affected by illness, unhappiness, ancestral spirits, magicians, or wizards.


    Associated Search Terms: Deviance/social control; Race; Marijuana; Smoking; Adolescents; Alcohol
  • Race, religion, and abstinence from alcohol in late life.
    Krause, Neal (2003)
    Journal of Aging and Health 15:3: 508-533.

    This ritual existed in the countryside of Maranhão for 40 years until the death of its organizer. It boasted fires, recitals, candles, cachaça (Brazilian alcoholic drink made from rice), & tambor (drum) dances; it took place in front of the tomb of the Miraculous Soul. It revealed a syncretism with beliefs of popular Catholicism, folklore, & the power of souls. The rituals of affliction helped those who believed that they had been affected by illness, unhappiness, ancestral spirits, magicians, or wizards.



    Associated Search Terms: Race; Gerontology; Alcohol
  • Religion and vulnerability among low-risk adolescents.
    Regnerus, Mark D., and Glen H. Elder (2003)
    Social Science Research 32:4: 633-658.

    This ritual existed in the countryside of Maranhão for 40 years until the death of its organizer. It boasted fires, recitals, candles, cachaça (Brazilian alcoholic drink made from rice), & tambor (drum) dances; it took place in front of the tomb of the Miraculous Soul. It revealed a syncretism with beliefs of popular Catholicism, folklore, & the power of souls. The rituals of affliction helped those who believed that they had been affected by illness, unhappiness, ancestral spirits, magicians, or wizards.




    Associated Search Terms: Education; Deviance/social control; Delinquency; Drug; Adolescents; Alcohol
  • Following the Leader? Mormon Voting on Ballot Propositions.
    Campbell, David E., and J. Quin Monson (2003)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 42:4: 605-619.

    Only a conjuncture of an official church stand & agreement among church leaders will "deliver" a Mormon vote on an issue.

    Associated Search Terms: Politics, U.S.A.; Alcohol; Mormon, U.S.A.
  • Religious beliefs and practice, and alcohol use in Thai men.
    Assanangkornchai, Sawitri, Katherine M. Conigrave, and John B. Saunders (2002)
    Alcohol and alcoholism 37:2: 193-197.

    Examines the relationship between Buddhist upbringing & beliefs & alcohol use disorders in Thai men. 3 groups, comprising 144 non/infrequent/light drinkers, 77 hazardous/ harmful drinkers & 91 alcohol dependents were interviewed regarding their early religious life & current religious practices & beliefs. No protective association was shown between early religious life & later alcohol use disorders; indeed, having lived as a boy in a temple for a period was commoner in those with adult alcohol problems.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Belief; Practice; Thailand; Buddhist, Thailand
  • Modernity's limits: Pentecostalism and the moral rejection of alcohol in Malawi.
    Dijk, Rijk van (2002)
    In Deborah Fahy Bryceson (ed.) alcohol in Africa: Mixing Business, Pleasure, and Politics. Portsmouth, New Hampshire: Heinemann, pp. 249-265.

    x

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Malawi; Pentecostal, Malawi
  • A longitudinal study of the effects of religiosity on adolescent alcohol use and alcohol-related problems.
    Mason, W. Alex, and Michael Windle (2002)
    Journal of Adolescent Research 17:4: 346-363.

    x

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Alcohol
  • Between Sacral Belief and Moral Community: A Multidimensional Approach to the Relationship between Religion and Alcohol among Whites and Blacks."
    Ford, Julie M., and Charles Kadushin (2002)
    Sociological Forum 17: 255-279.

    Although effects due to religious denomination are certainly a factor in the risk for dependency, this is much more so the case among whites than among blacks. By contrast, among blacks, frequency of church attendance, a measure of integration, is a more powerful predictor of risk than it is for whites.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Denomination (organizational entity); Race; Integration (social); Alcohol; African Americans
  • The Soul of Recovery: Uncovering the Spiritual Dimension in the Treatment of Addictions.
    Ringwood, Christopher D. (2002)
    New York: Oxford University Press.

    Although effects due to religious denomination are certainly a factor in the risk for dependency, this is much more so the case among whites than among blacks. By contrast, among blacks, frequency of church attendance, a measure of integration, is a more powerful predictor of risk than it is for whites.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Drug
  • Religion and American Adolescent Delinquency, Risk Behaviors and Constructive Social Activities.
    Smith, Christian, and Robert Faris (2002)
    Chapel Hill, North Carolina: National Study of Youth and Religion.

    Analyzes 1996 survey data from American adolescents (grade 12 students). Religious participation is shown to have benign correlates.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Athletics; Students, secondary; Education; Voluntarism; Drug; Tobacco; Delinquency; Adolescents; Alcohol
  • Moral Reconstruction: Christian Lobbyists and the Federal Legislation of Morality 1865-1920.
    Foster, Gaines M. (2002)
    Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press.

    Between 1865 & 1920, Congress passed laws to regulate obscenity, sexuality, divorce, gambling, & prizefighting. It forced Mormons to abandon polygamy, attacked interstate prostitution, made narcotics contraband, & stopped the manufacture & sale of alcohol. The author explores the force behind this unprecedented federal regulation of personal morality--a combined Christian lobby.

    Associated Search Terms: Politics, U.S.A.; Moral; Historical
  • The Role of Religion in Predicting Adolescent Alcohol Use and Problem Drinking.
    Brown, Tamara L., Gregory S. Parks, Rick S. Zimmerman, and Clarenda M. Phillips (2001)
    Journal of Studies on Alcohol 62:5: 676-705.

    Religiosity is differentially associated with alcohol use & problem drinking for white & black adolescents.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Alcohol; Race
  • Family, religious, school and peer influences on adolescent alcohol use: A longitudinal study.
    Mason, W. Alex, and Michael Windle (2001)
    Journal of Studies on Alcohol 62: 44-53.

    Religiosity is differentially associated with alcohol use & problem drinking for white & black adolescents.


    Associated Search Terms: Peers; Longitudinal; Alcohol; Adolescents
  • Substance Use: Spirituality and Religious Participation as Protective Factors among Rural Youths.
    Hodge, David R., Paul Cardenas, and Harry Montoya (2001)
    Social Work Research 25:3: 153-161.

    Religious participation predicted never using alcohol, marijuana, & hard drugs; spirituality predicted never using marijuana & hard drugs.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug; Alcohol; Adolescents; Rural; Practice
  • Against Culture: Development, Politics, and Religion in Indian Alaska.
    Dombrowski, Kirk (2001)
    Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press.

    Conversion to Pentecostalism by some Native Americans in Alaska led to conflict with those seeking to preserve their traditional culture.

    Associated Search Terms: Conflict; Alcohol; Native Americans; Pentecostal, U.S.A.; United States, Alaska
  • Religious Activity, Alcohol Use, and Depression in a Sample of Elderly Baptists.
    Musick, Marc A., Daniel G. Blazer, and Judith C. Hays (2000)
    Research on Aging 22: 91-116.

    Conversion to Pentecostalism by some Native Americans in Alaska led to conflict with those seeking to preserve their traditional culture.


    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Baptist; Alcohol; Depression
  • Thriving, not simply surviving: Goddess spirituality and women's recovery from alcoholism.
    Foltz, Tanice G. (2000)
    In Wendy Griffin (ed.) Daughters of the Goddess: Studies in healing, identity, and empowerment. Walnut Creek, California: AltaMira, pp. 119-135.

    Based on 1995 interviews & 1996 survey data from the U.S. Midwest.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Goddess
  • Religiosity, sensation seeking, and alcohol/drug use in denominational and gender contexts.
    Forthun, Larry F., Nancy J. Bell, Charles W. Peek, and Sheh-Wei Sun (1999)
    Journal of Drug Issues 29: 75-90.

    Employing a college student sample, the authors found no support for arousal theory predictions nor for moderating effects of denominational & gender contexts. Religiosity, sensation seeking, denominational affiliation, & gender were relatively independent predictors of substance use, with their importance varying dependent upon type of substance & specific indicator of use (amount versus grade of 1st use).

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Denomination (organizational entity); Drug; Gender
  • Resiliency Factors Protecting Against Teenage Alcohol Use and Smoking: Influences of Religion, Religious Involvement and Values, and Ethnicity in the Missouri Adolescent Female Twin Study.
    Heath, Andrew C., Pamela A. Madden, Julia D. Grant, T.L. McLaughlin, Alexander A. Todorov, and Kathleen K. Bucholz (1999)
    Twin Research 2: 145-155.

    x

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Tobacco; Practice; Ethnic; United States, Missouri; Adolescents
  • Regional Patterns of African American Church Attendance: Revisiting the Semi-Involuntary Thesis.
    Hunt, Larry L., and Matthew O. Hunt (1999)
    Social Forces 78:2: 779-791. Comment by Christopher G. Ellison and Darren E. Sherkat, 793-802.

    Tests the "semi-involuntary thesis" with 1972-94 General Social Survey (U.S.A..) data & a 1984 National Alcohol Survey (U.S.A..)

    Associated Search Terms: Salience; African Americans; Practice
  • Apostles and Zionists: The influence of religion on demographic change in rural Zimbabwe.
    Gregson, Simon, Tom Zhuwau, Roy M. Anderson, and Stephen K. Chandiwana (1999)
    Population Studies 53: 179-193.

    Differences in recent demographic trends between Mission & Independent or "Spirit-type" churches: Birth rates & until recently infant mortality are higher in some Spirit-type churches. Recent increases in mortality were seen in Mission churches. Differences in teachings on healthcare-seeking & sexual behavior & differences in church regulation could explain the contrast. More restrictive norms on alcohol consumption & extra-marital relationships in Spirit-type churches may limit the spread of HIV & thereby reduce mortality.

    Associated Search Terms: Demography; Zimbabwe
  • Effect of Religiosity on Alcohol Use in a College Student Sample.
    Patock-Peckham, Julie A., Geoffrey T. Hutchnson, Jeewon Cheong, and Craig T. Nagoshi (1998)
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence 49:2: 81-88.

    Differences in recent demographic trends between Mission & Independent or "Spirit-type" churches: Birth rates & until recently infant mortality are higher in some Spirit-type churches. Recent increases in mortality were seen in Mission churches. Differences in teachings on healthcare-seeking & sexual behavior & differences in church regulation could explain the contrast. More restrictive norms on alcohol consumption & extra-marital relationships in Spirit-type churches may limit the spread of HIV & thereby reduce mortality.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Religiosity; Students, undergraduate
  • Spiritual and Religious Factors in Substance Use, Dependence, and Recovery.
    Booth, Jennifer Lynn, and John Edward Martin (1998)
    In Harold G. Koenig (ed.) Handbook of Religion and Mental Health. San Diego: Academic Press, pp. 175-200.

    Examines the clinical research and programmatic interventions addressing the influence of religiousness and spirituality on substance use, abuse, and recovery. Harmful substance use targeted in this chapter includes alcohol, drugs of abuse, and tobacco.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Drug
  • Moral Entrepreneuring in Japan: A Labeling Theory Analysis of the Salvation Army's Efforts.
    Nelson, Jack E. (1998)
    Review of Religious Research 40:1: 35-54.

    Historical case study of Salvation Army missionary endeavors in Japan.

    Associated Search Terms: Symbolic crusade; Moral entrepreneur; Moral; Missions; Alcohol; Japan; Labeling; Salvation Army, Japan
  • The Impact of Personality and Religion on Attitude toward Substance use among 13-15 Year Olds.
    Francis, Leslie J. (1997)
    Drug and Alcohol Dependence 44:2-3: 95-103.

    A negative attitude toward substance use is associated with tendermindedness, introversion, stability & social conformity. Personal religiosity & membership of Protestant sects are also positively correlated with rejection of substance use, even after controlling for individual differences in personality.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Drug; Adolescents
  • An Examination of a Reciprocal Relationship between Religiosity and Different forms of Delinquency within a Theoretical Model.
    Benda, Brent B. (1997)
    Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 34: 163-186.

    Whereas there are reciprocal relationships between religiosity & drug use & religiosity & crime, only the feedback effect of religiosity on alcohol use is significant. These latter findings suggest that future studies need to examine reciprocal relationships & that the relationship between alcohol use & religiosity needs to be reexamined conceptually & empirically in future studies.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Delinquency
  • Struggles for Mutual Reverence. Social Strategies and Religious Stories.
    Lawson, Matthew P. (1997)
    In Penny Edgell Becker and Nancy L. Eiesland (eds.) Contemporary American Religion. An Ethnographic Reader. Walnut Creek, California: AltaMira, pp. 51-77.

    Life history data of 4 women gathered as part of an ethnography of a Catholic charismatic prayer group outside Chicago.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Illinois, Chicago; Pentecostal, Catholic, U.S.A.; Symbol; Ritual; Testimonial; Alcohol; Power
  • Religion as Context: Hellfire and Delinquency one More Time.
    Stark, Rodney (1996)
    Sociology of Religion 57:2: 163-173.

    Analyzes 1980 questionnaire data from U.S. high school seniors; finds a macro inverse relation between church attendance rates & trouble with the law, outside the Pacific region.

    Associated Search Terms: Contextual effects; Moral community; Alcohol; United States; Drug; Students, secondary; Delinquency; Ecology
  • Framing and Strategy: Explaining Differential Longevity in the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and the Anti-Saloon League.
    Donovan, Brian L. (1995)
    Sociological Inquiry 65:2: 143-155.

    Examines the sources of strength & mobilizing impetus in the Anti-Saloon League & the Woman's Christian Temperance Union in the early 20th century. Both the relative success of the WCTU & the failure of the ASL were contingent upon their ability to adapt their rhetoric & corresponding strategies to rapid shifts in the cultural & economic climate of the late twenties and early thirties.

    Associated Search Terms: Social movement; Alcohol; Woman´s Christian Temperance Union
  • The Therapeutic God: Transcendence and Identity in two Twelve-step Quasi-religions.
    Rice, John Steadman (1994)
    In Arthur L. Greil and Thomas Robbins (eds.) Religion an the Social Order. Volume 4 Between Sacred and Secular: Research and theory on Quasi-Religion. Greenwich, Connecticut: JAI Press, pp. 151-164.

    Contrasts the ideologies & social programs of Co-Dependents Anonymous & Alcoholics Anonymous.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcoholics Anonymous; Co-Dependents Anonymous; Quasi-religion
  • Is the Religiosity-Delinquency Relationship Spurious? A Test of Arousal and Social Control Theories.
    Cochran, John K., Peter B. Wood, and Bruce J. Arneklev (1994)
    Journal of Research in Crime and Delinquency 31: 92-123.

    Oklahoma data suggest the religiosity-delinquency relationship is largely spurious, except for deviance with legal substances: alcohol & tobacco.

    Associated Search Terms: Delinquency; Social control; Adolescents; Alcohol; Tobacco
  • Religiosity, religious conservatism, bonds to school, and juvenile delinquency among three categories of drug users.
    Free, Marvin D. Jr. (1994)
    Deviant Behavior 15(2): 151–170.

    Religiosity was negatively related to minor delinquency & alcohol use & negatively related to marijuana & other illicit drug use in a model containing polydrug users. Religious conservatism had no significant effect on minor delinquency, marijuana use, or other illicit drug use. This variable was negatively related to alcohol use, however.

    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Marijuana; Drug; Deviance/social control; Conservative, U.S.A.; Alcohol; Adolescents
  • Religion and Adolescent Drug Use: A Comparison of Mormons and Other Religions.
    Bahr, Stephen J. (1994)
    In Marie Cornwall, Tim B. Heaton, and Lawrence A. Young (eds.), Contemporary Mormonism. Social Science Perspectives. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, pp. 118-137.

    Analyzes 1984-87 questionnaire data from American high school students; Mormons use cigarettes, alcohol, & other drugs less than others; religious activity levels inversely relate to substance use.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.; Religiosity; Fundamentalist, U.S.A.; Social control; Protestant, U.S.A.; Students, secondary; Mormon, U.S.A.; Drug; Alcohol
  • Religious Practices and Alcohlism in a Southern Adult Population.
    Koenig, Harold G., Linda K. George, K.G. Meador, Daniel G. Blazer, and S.M. Ford (1994)
    Hospital and Community Psychiatry 54:3: 225-231.

    Analyzes 1984-87 questionnaire data from American high school students; Mormons use cigarettes, alcohol, & other drugs less than others; religious activity levels inversely relate to substance use.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; United States, South
  • Liberação e ética; uma análise do discurso de pentecostais que se recuperaram do alcoolismo.
    Mariz, Cecília Loreto (1994)
    In R. Valle and I. Sarti (eds.) Nem deuses, nem demônios. Petrópolis: Vozes.

    Analyzes 1984-87 questionnaire data from American high school students; Mormons use cigarettes, alcohol, & other drugs less than others; religious activity levels inversely relate to substance use.



    Associated Search Terms: Moral; Discourse analysis; Alcohol; Pentecostal, Brazil; Brazil
  • Le témoignage chez les Alcooliques Anonymes: une pratique communicationnelle religieuse.
    Nadeau, Jean-Guy (1994)
    Studies in Religion/Sciences religieuses 23:4: 469-484.

    Based on observation in 2 groups in Montréal; employs communications theory.

    Associated Search Terms: Testimonial; Hermeneutic; Canada, Quebec, Montreal; Alcoholics Anonymous; Communication; Participant observation
  • The Variable Effects of Religiosity and Denomination on Adolescent Self-Reported Alcohol Use by Beverage Type.
    Cochran, John K. (1993)
    Journal of Drug Issues 23:3: 479-499.

    For adolescents, the use of beer & liquor are largely restricted to recreational purposes, while wine has both functional & recreational uses. Because purely recreational use of psychotropic substances violates religious standards of asceticism, the effects of religiosity on the use of beer & liquor should be stronger than on the use of wine. The results show this the case.

    Associated Search Terms: Denomination (organizational entity); Alcohol; Religiosity; Adolescents
  • Family and Religious Influences on Adolescent Substance Abuse.
    Bahr, Stephen J., R.D. Hawks, and G. Wang (1993)
    Youth & Society 24: 443-465.

    x

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Drug; Alcohol
  • Perceived Parents' Religiosity, Friends' Drinkng, and Hellfire: A Panel Study of Adolescent Drinking.
    Burkett, Steven R. (1993)
    Review of Religious Research 35:2: 134-154.

    Analyzes 1980-82 longitudinal questionnaire data from high school students in a northwest U.S. city; shows parents' religiosity having no direct effect on delinquency, but an effect mediated through respondents' religiosity & selection of friends.

    Associated Search Terms: Network; Religiosity; Socialization; Alcohol; Delinquency; Students, secondary
  • The Influence of Religious Stability and Homogamy on the Relationship between Religiosity and Alcohol Use among Protestants.
    Cochran, John K., Leonard Beeghley, and E. Wilbur Bock (1992)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 31:4: 441-456.

    Analyzes 1972-89 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data; shows religious effects on alcohol use, reflecting denominations' tenets, for current, childhood, & spouse's denomination.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; United States; Socialization; Family
  • Stepping to Redemption.
    Chalfant, H. Paul (1992)
    Free Inquiry in Creative Sociology 20: 115-120.

    Shows Alcoholics Anonymous meets the definition of religion; notes such quests for ultimate meaning outside formal religion in the postmodern world.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcoholics Anonymous; Post-modern
  • Religion and Drinking in the Retirement Community.
    Alexander, Francesca, and Robert W. Duff (1992)
    Journal of Religious Gerontology 8:4: 27-44.

    Analyzes interview data from West Coast U.S. retirement communities; finds religious participation related to less alcohol use.

    Associated Search Terms: Gerontology; Alcohol; Practice
  • Religion and Substance Abuse.
    Benson, Peter L. (1992)
    In John F. Schumaker (ed.), Religion and Mental Health. New York: Oxford University Press, pp. 211-220.

    Reviews the literature on religion lowering substance abuse rates.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Drug; Tobacco
  • Influence of Religiosity and Alcohol Use on Personal Well-Being.
    Alexander, Francesca, and Robert W. Duff (1991)
    Journal of Religious Gerontology 8:2: 11-25.

    Analyzes interview data from a community of retired secular professionals & a religious counterpart community; the latter had more life satisfaction, less death anxiety, & less alcohol use.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Death anxiety; Sisters; Well-being; Gerontology; Clergy
  • Stress, Religiosity, and Abstinence from Alcohol.
    Krause, Neal (1991)
    Psychology and Aging 6:1: 134-144.

    Analyzes interview data from a community of retired secular professionals & a religious counterpart community; the latter had more life satisfaction, less death anxiety, & less alcohol use.


    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Alcohol; Stress
  • Religious Commitment, Yuppie Values, and Well-being in Post-collegiate Life.
    Perkins, H. Wesley (1991)
    Review of Religious Research 32:3: 244-251.

    Analyzes 1987-88 questionnaire data from 1979, '82, & '83 graduates of northeastern U.S. elite colleges.

    Associated Search Terms: Well-being; Alcohol; Generations; Values
  • Religious Change and Alcohol Use: An Application of Reference Group and Socialization Theory.
    Beeghley, Leonard, E. Wilbur Bock, and John K. Cochran (1990)
    Sociological Forum 5:2: 261-178.

    Analyzes 1972-86 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data; compares alcohol use by those raised in proscribing religions & converts to them, converts to non-proscribing ones, & those raised in these.

    Associated Search Terms: Socialization; Alcohol; United States; Reference group; Conversion
  • Influence of Religion and Culture on Drinking Behaviors: A Test of Hypotheses between Canada and the USA.
    Engs, Ruth C., David J. Hanson, Louis Gliksman, and Cynthia Smythe (1990)
    British Journal of Addiction 85: 1475-1482.

    American Roman Catholic & mainstream Protestant students consume more alcohol & have more alcohol abuse problem compared to Canadian students within the same religious groups. Among abstinent oriented Protestants there was no difference in regards to alcohol consumption or problems related to drinking between the countries. For Jews there were mixed results with Americans exhibiting similar consumption rates but reporting more problems related to drinking compared to the Canadians.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Comparative; Alcohol; Canada
  • Religiosity, Social Class, and Alcohol Use: An Application of Reference Group Theory.
    Clarke, Leslie, Leonard Beeghley, and John K. Cochran (1990)
    Sociological Perspectives 33:2: 201-218.

    Analyzes 1972-86 General Social Survey data.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Stratification; Religiosity; Reference group; United States
  • Religious Values and Beliefs and Place of Residence as Predictors of Alcohol Use among Chinese College Students in Singapore.
    Isralowitz, Richard E., and Tech-Hong Ong (1990)
    International Journal of the Addictions 25:5: 515-529.

    Analyzes 1972-86 General Social Survey data.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Singapore; Students, undergraduate
  • Pentecostalismo y Alcohalismo entre los Pobres de Brasil.
    Mariz, Cecília Loreto (1990)
    Cristianismo y sociedad 28:3: 39-44.

    Analyzes 1972-86 General Social Survey data.



    Associated Search Terms: Pentecostal, Brazil; Brazil; Alcohol; Stratification
  • Beyond Hellfire: An Exploration of the Variable Effects of Religiosity on Adolescent Marijuana and Alcohol Use.
    Cochran, John K., and Ronald Akers (1989)
    Journal of Rsearch in Crime and Delinquency 26:3: 198-225.

    Religion limits teenage marijuana & alcohol use; analyzes questionnaire data from Midwest U.S. 7-12th graders.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug; Alcohol; Students, primary; Students, secondary; Social control
  • Is Alcoholics Anonymous a Religious Organization? Mediatations on Marginality.
    Rudy, David R., and Arthur L. Greil (1989)
    Sociological Analysis 50:1: 41-51.

    Religion limits teenage marijuana & alcohol use; analyzes questionnaire data from Midwest U.S. 7-12th graders.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Alcoholics Anonymous; Marginality
  • Religious Participation, Southern University Women, and Abstinence.
    Humphrey, John A., Paul Leslie, and Jean Brittain (1989)
    Deviant Behavior 10:2: 145-155.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from female students at a black & a white state university in southeast U.S.A..; shows religious participation inversely related to use of alcohol & marijuana.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug; Alcohol; Students, undergraduate; Women
  • Religiosity and Alcohol Behavior: An Exploration of Reference Group Theory.
    Cochran, John K., Leonard Beeghley, and E. Wilbur Bock (1988)
    Sociological Forum 3:2: 256-276.

    Religious reference groups affect alcohol use, but not abuse; analyses 1972-84 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Reference group; Alcohol
  • Becoming an Ex: The Process of Role Exit.
    Ebaugh, Helen Rose (1988)
    Chicago: University of Chicago Press.

    Drawing on interviews with 185 people, Ebaugh explores a wide range of role changes, including ex-convicts, ex-alcoholics, divorced people, mothers without custody of their children, ex-doctors, ex-cops, retirees, ex-nuns, & transsexuals. As this diverse sample reveals, Ebaugh focuses on voluntary exits from significant roles.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, U.S.A.; Role exit
  • Parental Religion and Alcohol Use Problems as Intergenerational Predictors of Problem Drinking among College Youth.
    Perkins, H. Wesley (1987)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 26:3: 340-357.

    Analyzes 1984 questionnaire data from students at a private college in New York State; shows effects of parents' religion on alcohol use.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Students, undergraduate; Family; Denomination (organizational entity)
  • Moral Messages: The Relative Influence of Denomination on the Religiosity-Alcohol Relationship.
    Bock, E. Wilbur, John K. Cochran, and Leonard Beeghley (1987)
    Sociological Quarterly 28:1: 89-103.

    Analyzes 1972-80 General Social Survey (U.S.A.) data.

    Associated Search Terms: United States; Alcohol; Denomination (organizational entity); Religiosity; Reference group
  • The Variable Effects of Religiosity on Deviant Behavior.
    Cochran, John K. (1987)
    Unpublished Ph.D.. dissertation, University of Flroida [DA 48:8 A, p. 2165]

    Analyzes survey data from adolescents in 3 Midwest U.S. states.

    Associated Search Terms: Deviance/social control; Adolescents; Drug; Alcohol
  • Life-style and Health Status of American Catholic Priests.
    Fichter, Joseph H. (1987)
    Social Compass 34:4: 539-548.

    Based on a survey of 4,660 Catholic priests in the U.S.A. Their state of health corrected with abstention from tobacco, moderate use of alcoholic beverages, physical exercise, hours of sleep, and control of weight. Those in good health also tended to have good mental health.

    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Clergy; Health; Catholic, U.S.A.
  • Religion, Family, and Adolescent Drug Use.
    Amoateng, Acheampong Yaw, and Stephen J. Bahr (1986)
    Sociological Perspctives 29:1: 53-76.

    Level of religiosity had a significant association with alcohol & marijuana use among all religious denominations, although the magnitude of the relationship varied by denomination. Religious denomination, gender, & race were also related to drug use.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Drug; Alcohol; Marijuana
  • Religious Traditions, Parents, and Peers as Determinants of Alcohol and Drug use Among College Students.
    Perkins, H. Wesley (1985)
    Review of Religious Research 27:1: 15-31.

    Analyzes 1984 questionnaire data from students at a private college in New York State; shows denominational effects (low Jewish use of alcohol) disappearing among students as they stay in college longer.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Drug; Students, undergraduate; Family; Peers
  • Drug Use and Religious Affiliation, Feelings, and Behavior.
    Adlaf, E.M., and R.G. Smart (1985)
    British Journal of Addiction 80:2: 163-171.

    Church attendance & religious belief lowered adolescent drug & alcohol use, especially among females.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Alcohol; Belief; Drug; Practice
  • Religion and Youth Substance Abuse.
    Lorch, Barbara R., and Robert H. Hughes (1985)
    Journal of Religion and Health 24: 197-208.

    Analyzes 1983 questionnaire data from 7-12 grade students in & near Colorado Springs; salience of religion was most inversely related to substance abuse, membership less so; Fundamentalist denomination to less alcohol use, liberal to less heavy drug use.

    Associated Search Terms: Drug; Alcohol; United States, Colorado, Colorado Springs; Fundamentalist, U.S.A.; Liberal, U.S.A.; Students, primary; Students, secondary
  • Ivrognerie, religiosité et sport dans une ville algérienne (Oran) 1962-1983).
    Benkheira, Mohammed Hocine (1985)
    Archives de sciences sociales des religions 59:1: 131-152.

    Focuses on the state mobilization of both religion & sport for purposes of centralizing public culture.

    Associated Search Terms: Algeria, Oran; Sport; Alcohol
  • Conversion to the World View of Alcoholics Anonymous: A Refinement of Conversion Theory.
    Greil, Arthur L., and David R. Rudy (1983)
    Qualitative Sociology 6:1: 5-28.

    Based on observational data; finds the "process model" of conversion inadequate for interpreting the adoption of the Alcoholics Anonymous ideology.

    Associated Search Terms: Conversion; Alcoholics Anonymous; Alcohol
  • The Alcoholic Priest and Alcoholics Anonymous. A Study of Stigma and the Management of Spoiled Identity.
    Fappiano, Eugene Rydin (1983)
    Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, New School for Social Research.

    x

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Alcoholics Anonymous; Clergy; Stigma
  • The Rehabilitation of Clergy Alcoholics. Ardent Spirits Subdued.
    Fichter, Joseph H. (1982)
    New York: Human Sciences Press.

    x

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Alcohol
  • Cancer in Utah Mormon Women by Church Activity Level.
    Gardner, John W., and Joseph L. Lyon (1982)
    American Journal of Epidemiology 1116:2: 258-265.

    Analyzes archival data on 1975 deaths of Utah residents diagnosed with cancer 1966-70; Mormon women's church activity inversely predicts tobacco & alcohol related cancer.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Utah; Mormon; Medical; Tobacco; Alcohol
  • Fire and Brimstone, Lager and Pot: Religious Involvement and Substance Use.
    Nelsen, Hart M., and James F. Rooney (1982)
    Sociological Analysis 43:3: 247-256.

    Analyzes 1977 questionnaire data from high school students in the northeast U.S.; shows religious practice inversely related to hard drug use & membership in proscribing denominations inversely related to soft drug use.

    Associated Search Terms: Deviance/social control; Drug; Students, secondary; Alcohol
  • Religious Affilition and Abstinence: A Fifteen-year Change.
    Nusbaumer, M.R. (1981)
    Journal of Studies on Alcohol 42:1: 127-131.

    Analyzes 1977 questionnaire data from high school students in the northeast U.S.; shows religious practice inversely related to hard drug use & membership in proscribing denominations inversely related to soft drug use.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol
  • Religiosity, Beliefs, Normative Standards, and Adolescent Drinking.
    Burkett, Steven R. (1980)
    Journal of Studies on Alcohol 41:7: 662-671.

    Protestants were more likely than Catholics, religious adolescents were more likely than the nonreligious, & adolescents who believe that drinking is a sin were far more likely than adolescents who did not share that belief to disapprove of drinking and to abstain from drinking.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Alcohol; Belief
  • How Jews Avoid Alcohol Problems.
    Glassner, Barry, and Bruce Berg (1980)
    American Sociological Review 45:4: 647-664.

    Data from a detailed study of Jews in an American community highlight informal social control.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, U.S.A.; Alcohol; Deviance/social control
  • The Social Development of the Synanon Cult: The Managerial Strategy of Organizational Transformation.
    Ofshe, Richard (1980)
    Sociological Analysis 41:2: 109-127.

    Development history of Synanon, from 1950 origin as alternative to Alcoholics Anonymous through 3 transformations: therapeutic community, alternative society; religion. The changes were management strategies for expanding & consolidating control.

    Associated Search Terms: Organization; Synanon; Change; Deviance/social control
  • Religious Affiliation and Adolescent Drinking.
    Schlegel, Ronald P., and Margaret D. Sanborn (1979)
    Journal of Studies on Alcohol 40:7: 693-703.

    Analyzes 1974 questionnaire data from high school students in southern Ontario; non-churchgoers drank most, fundamentalist attenders least, & Catholic & liberal protestant attenders in between.

    Associated Search Terms: Students, secondary; Canada, Ontario; Catholic, Canada; Protestant, Canada; Fundamentalist, Canada; Alcohol
  • The Relationship between Self-Reported Religiosity and Drug Use by College Students.
    Turner, Carol J., and Robert J. Willis (1979)
    Journal of Drug Education 9:1: 67-78.

    Analyzes 1975 questionnaire data from students at a private university in New Jersey; the very religious & not at all religious were lease likely to use drugs & alcohol; only the religious cited parental influence to explain non-use.

    Associated Search Terms: Students, undergraduate; Alcohol; Family; Drug
  • Super-saints and Mini-saints.
    Fichter, Joseph H. (1979)
    In David O. Moberg (ed.), Spiritual Well-Being. Sociological Perspectives. Washington: University Press of America, pp. 255-263.

    x

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Alcohol
  • Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God: Fundamentalist Fears about Drunken Driving.
    Peek, Charles W., H. Paul Chalfant, and Edward V. Milton (1979)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 18:1: 29-39.

    Analyzes 1972-75 survey data from a southern U.S. city; shows that religion might deter drunken driving for certain sectors of the population.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Social control
  • Urban Problems and Rural Solutions: Drink and Disestablishment in the First World War.
    Mews, Stuart P. (1979)
    In Derek Baker (ed.) The Church in Town and Countryside. Oxford: Blackwell, pp. 449-476.

    Analyzes 1972-75 survey data from a southern U.S. city; shows that religion might deter drunken driving for certain sectors of the population.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Urban/rural; Great Britain
  • Alcoholic Priests: A Sociological Study.
    Sorensen, Andrew A. (1977)
    New York: Seabury.

    Based on interview data comparing the careers of 65 alcoholic & 56 non-alcoholic priests.

    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, U.S.A.; Episcopal; Clergy; Alcohol
  • Religion, Parental Influence, and Adolescent Alcohol and Marijuana Use.
    Burkett, Steven R. (1977)
    Journal of Drug Issues 7:3: 263-273.

    Analyzes questionnaire data from students at 3 Pacific northwest U.S. high schools. Church attendance correlates inversely with marijuana & beer use; parents' attendance lacks direct effects.

    Associated Search Terms: Family; Socialization; Drug; Alcohol; Students, secondary
  • Catholics and Temperance. The General Catholic Attitude Toward Alcohol.
    Fichter, Joseph H. (1976)
    Commonweal 103:20: 621-626.

    Historical treatment focusing on the United States.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Historical
  • Cancer Incidence in Mormons and Non-Mormons in Utah 1966-1970.
    Lyon, Joseph L., Melville R. Klauber, John W. Gardner, and Charles R. Smart (1976)
    New England Journal of Medicine 294:3: 129-133.

    Associates the Mormon abstention from tobacco & alcohol with lower cancer rates.

    Associated Search Terms: Mormon, U.S.A.; United States, Utah; Tobacco; Alcohol; Medical
  • The Effect of Religious Factors on Intoxicant Use.
    Parfrey, P.S. (1976)
    Scandinavian Journal of Social Medicine 3: 135-140.

    Associates the Mormon abstention from tobacco & alcohol with lower cancer rates.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Drug
  • Localism and Temperance.
    Wilson, John, and Kenneth Manton (1975)
    Sociology and Social Research 59:2: 121-135.

    Analyzes 1971 questionnaire data from Charlotte, North Carolina, prior to a referendum on liquor laws. Interprets data to show localism, including church attendance, related to opposition to liquor.

    Associated Search Terms: Politics, U.S.A.; Local/cosmopolitan; Practice; Alcohol; United States, North Carolina, Charlotte
  • Need for Power among Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Clergy.
    Sorensen, Andrew A. (1973)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 12:1: 101-108.

    Based on New England snowball samples of Catholic & Episcopal priests known to be alcoholic; clergy with personal, as opposed to socialized, needs for power are shown more likely to drink to excess.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Alcohol; Episcopal; Catholic, U.S.A.
  • The Development of Alcoholism among Roman Catholic and Protestant Episcopal Clergymen.
    Sorensen, Andrew A. (1971)
    Unpublished Ph.D.. dissertation, Yale University. [DA 32:12 A, p. 7101]

    Compares careers of 65 alcoholic & 56 non-alcoholic priests; based on interviews.

    Associated Search Terms: Clergy; Alcohol; Episcopal; Catholic, U.S.A.
  • Religious-ethnic Differences in Alcohol Consumption.
    Wechsler, Henry, Harold W. Demone, Jr., Denise Thum, and Elizabeth H. Kasey (1970)
    Journal of Health and Social Behavior 11:1: 21-29.

    Analyzes data from persons over 16 yrs. Old treated in the emergency room of Massachusetts General Hospital, 1966-67.

    Associated Search Terms: United States, Massachusetts, Boston; Alcohol; Medical
  • Religious Affiliation and Use of Drugs among Adolescent Students.
    Whitehead, Paul C. (1970)
    Journal for the scientific Study of Religion 9:2: 152-154. [Also in Stewart Crysdale and Les Wheatcroft (eds.) Religion in Canadian Society. Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, 1976, pp. 479-484]

    Analyzes questionnaire data from 7th grade-high school students in Halifax; reports % Protestants, Catholics, Jews, & nones using selected drugs.

    Associated Search Terms: Atheist; Drug; Students, primary; Students, secondary; Tobacco; Alcohol; Jewish, Canada; Catholic, Canada; Protestant, Canada; Canada, Nova Scotia, Halifax
  • Religiosity and Adolescent Drinking Behavior.
    Preston, James D. (1969)
    Sociological Quarterly 10:3: 372-383.

    Analyzes interview data from high school students in 2 towns in the American South; sees religiosity varying inversely with alcohol use by adolescents.

    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol; Students, secondary; United States, South
  • Church Affiliation and Denominational Values.
    Rodd, Cyril S. (1968)
    Sociology 2:1: 79-90.

    Compares attitudes of Methodists, Anglicans, Catholics, & non-adherents, about alcohol, gambling, & divorce; shows communality correlated with rigorist views.

    Associated Search Terms: Comparative; Divorce; Gambling; Alcohol; Catholic, Great Britain; Church of England; Methodist, Great Britain; Great Britain; Communality
  • Religious Differences in Lay Attitudes and Knowledge on Alcoholism and its Treatment.
    Linsky, Arnold S. (1965)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 5:1: 41-50.

    Analyzes interview data from residents of Vancouver, Washington; uses 4 organizational labels: Catholic, Protestant: ecclesia, denomination, fundamentalist.

    Associated Search Terms: Fundamentalist; Protestant, U.S.A.; Catholic, U.S.A.; United States, Washington, Vancouver; Alcohol; Typology
  • Religious Thought and Beliefs in the Southern Appalachians as Revealed by an Attitude Survey.
    Ford, Thomas R. (1961)
    Review of Religious Research 3:1: 2-21.

    Puritanical views (condemning alcohol, dance, gambling, swearing, cards, & tobacco) were inversely related to class & education; presents data on anti-Semitism.

    Associated Search Terms: Prejudice, anti-Semitism; United States, Appalachia; Stratification; Alcohol; Moral; Asceticism
  • Religious Affiliation and Drinking Behavior.
    Skolnick, Jerome H. (1958)
    Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol 19: 452-470.

    Analyzes 1949-51 questionnaire data from American undergraduate students.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, U.S.A.; Methodist, U.S.A.; Episcopal; Alcohol; Students, undergraduate
  • How Ontario Clergy Look at Alcoholism.
    Wolch, C. (1957)
    Alcholism Research 4: 1-7.

    Seeks to find the number of alcoholics known by Ontario clergy & how referrals were handled; elicits information about clergy attitudes toward alcohol & alcoholism.

    Associated Search Terms: Canada, Ontario; Clergy; Alcohol
  • The Stumbling Block: A Sociological Study of the Relationship between Selected Religious Norms and Drinking Behavior.
    Skolnick, Jerome H. (1957)
    Unpublished Ph.D.. dissertation, Yale University. [Published by Arno Press, New York, 1980].

    Seeks to find the number of alcoholics known by Ontario clergy & how referrals were handled; elicits information about clergy attitudes toward alcohol & alcoholism.


    Associated Search Terms: Alcohol
  • Culture and Jewish sobriety: The ingroup-outgroup factor.
    Snyder, Charles R. (1955)
    Quarterly Journal of Studies on Alcohol 16:4:700-742. Revised version in Marshall Sklare (ed.) The Jews: Social Patterns of an American Group. Glencoe, Illinois: Free Press, 1958, pp. 560-594.

    In-group vs. out-group tensions reinforce in-group norms of moderation in alcohol use.

    Associated Search Terms: Jewish, U.S.A.; Minority; Alcohol
[Viewing Matches 1-133] > [View Matches 1-136]  (of 136 total matches in Citations)
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