Data Archive
  • General Social Survey, 2016:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2016 GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2016, Uploaded 9/25/2017
  • General Social Survey, 2018:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2018 GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2018, Uploaded 9/9/2019
  • General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2014 GSS. There are a total of 3,842 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2014, Uploaded 8/10/2015
  • General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 10/16/2013
  • General Social Survey, 2021:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2021 GSS.

    The 2021 cross-sectional General Social Survey has been updated to Release Version 2 as of July 28, 2022. This Release includes the addition of respondent work information (including Occupation and Industry coding), demographic information about respondent's parents, and non-Hispanic race and ethnicity details.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2021, Uploaded 2/18/2022
  • General Social Survey Panel Data (2006 Sample):
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This GSS panel dataset has three waves of interviews: originally sampled and interviewed in 2006, interviewed for the second time in 2008, and interviewed for the third wave in 2010. This file contains those 2,000 respondents who were pre-selected among the 2006 samples and those variables that were asked at least twice in three waves. Survey items on religion include the following: religious preference, religion raised in, spouse's religious preference, frequency of religious service attendance, religious experiences, and religious salience.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/24/2012
  • National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (2012 and 2018-2019):
    The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations. Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the 1998 NCS data was the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. Subsequent NCS waves were conducted in 2006-07, 2012, and 2018-19.

    Like Wave II, Wave IV again included a panel component. In addition to the new cross-section of congregations generated in conjunction with the 2018 GSS, the NCS-IV included all Wave III congregations that were nominated by GSS respondents who participated in the GSS for the first time in 2012. That is, the panel did not include Wave III congregations that had been nominated by GSS respondents who were in the 2012 GSS because they were part of the GSS's own panel of re-interviewees. The 2018-19 NCS, then, includes a subset of congregations that also were interviewed in 2012. A full codebook, prepared by the primary investigator and containing a section with details about the panel datasets, is available for download here . The codebook contains the original questionnaire, as well as detailed information on survey methodology, weights, coding, and more.

    The NCS Cumulative Dataset is also available from the ARDA.
    Funded By: The National Congregations Study (NCS) was made possible by major grants from Lilly Endowment, Inc. The 1998 NCS also was supported by grants from the Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., Louisville Institute, Nonprofit Sector Research Fund of the Aspen Institute, and Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. The 2006-07 NCS also was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation , Kellogg Foundation, and Louisville Institute. The 2012 NCS also was supported by grants from the Pew Research Center's Religion and Public Life Project , Louisville Institute, Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at IUPUI, Rand Corporation, and Church Music Institute. The 2012 NCS also received generous support from Duke University and from the National Science Foundation via NSF support of the General Social Survey . The 2018-19 NCS also was supported by grants from the John Templeton Foundation , Louisville Institute, and Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life . The National Science Foundation supported the 2018-19 NCS via the module competition that subsidized including questions about respondents' congregations on the 2018 General Social Survey .
    Collected: 2019, Uploaded 5/24/2021
  • National Congregations Study, Panel Dataset (1998 and 2006-2007):
    The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset "fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing, for the first time, data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations" (Chaves et al. 1999, p.460). Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the NCS data is the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. In 2006-07, a panel component was added to the NCS. In addition to the new cross-section of congregations generated in conjunction with the 2006 General Social Survey (GSS), a stratified random sample was drawn from congregations who participated in the 1998 NCS. A full codebook, prepared by the primary investigator, is available for download here . The codebook contains the original questionnaire, as well as detailed information on survey methodology, weights, coding, and more.

    Variable names have been shortened to allow for downloading of the data set as an SPSS portable file. Original variable names are shown in parentheses at the beginning of each variable description.

    The NCS Cumulative Dataset is also available from the ARDA.
    Funded By: The National Congregations Study (NCS) was made possible by major grants from The Lilly Endowment, Inc. The 1998 NCS also was supported by grants from Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., the Louisville Institute, the Nonprofit Sector Research Fund of The Aspen Institute, and Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. The 2006-07 NCS also was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the Kellogg Foundation, and the Louisville Institute.
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 8/27/2009
  • General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2010 GSS. There are a total of 4,901 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2010 GSS featured special modules on aging, the Internet, shared capitalism, gender roles, intergroup relations, immigration, meeting spouse, knowledge about and attitudes toward science, religious identity, religious trends, genetics, veterans, crime and victimization, social networks and group membership, and sexual behavior (continuing the series started in 1988).

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. The 2006 GSS was the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2006 was selected for reinterview in 2008 and again in 2010 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2008 GSS consists of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2006. The 2010 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 2,044, the first reinterview wave of the 2,023 2008 panel cases with 1,581 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2006 panel with 1,276 completed cases. Altogether, the 2010 GSS had 4,901 cases (2,044 in the new 2010 panel, 1,581 in the 2008 panel, and 1,276 in the 2006 panel). The 2010 GSS is the first round to fully implement the new, rolling panel design. In 2012 and later GSSs, there will likewise be a fresh cross-section (wave one of a new panel), wave two panel cases from the immediately preceding GSS, and wave three panel cases from the next earlier GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/16/2011
  • General Social Survey, 2006:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS is designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 2006 GSS features special modules on mental health and social networks. Items on religion cover denominational affiliation, church attendance, religious upbringing, personal beliefs, and religious experiences.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 9/14/2007
  • International Social Survey Program: Religion II, 1998:
    Started in 1984, the International Social Survey Program (ISSP) is an ongoing program of cross-national collaboration. The program develops modules that deal with areas of interest in the social sciences. These modules supplement regular national surveys. The 1998 religion module includes data from Australia, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, the Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Slovenia, the Slovakian Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Like the 1991 International Social Survey Program: Religion I, this survey covers three main topic areas. The first addresses general attitudes toward various social issues including government, sex, abortion, male and female issues, and personal trust. Secondly, the module addresses religion, including the role of religious leaders, attitudes about God, attendance, miracles, and the Bible. Finally, the module has demographic information including age, sex, education, and occupation.
    Funded By: The research organization in each country funds all of its own costs and the merging of the data into a cross-national data set is performed by the Zentralarchiv fuer Empirische Sozialforschung, University of Cologne.
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 3/26/2006
  • General Social Survey, 2004:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 2004 data contain twelve topical modules, including modules on daily spiritual experiences and religious transformations.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention , CIRCLE, the Fetzer Institute , the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health , the Metanexus Institute , the Institute for Research on Unlimited Love , the National Human Genome Research Institute , the Smith Richardson Foundation , the Bureau of the Census , the Russell Sage Foundation , and Yale University .
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/9/2005
  • General Social Survey 2008 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 2008 GSS featured special modules on attitudes toward science and technology, self-employment, terrorism preparation, global economics, sports and leisure, social inequality, sexual behaviors and religion. Items on religion covered denominational affiliation, church attendance, religious upbringing, personal beliefs, and religious experiences.

    The GSS is in transition from a replicating cross-sectional design to a design that uses rotating panels. In 2008 there were two components: a new 2008 cross-section with 2,023 cases and the first re-interviews (panel) with 1,536 respondents from the 2006 GSS. The 2,023 cases in the cross-section have been previously released as a part of the 1972-2008 cumulative data. This new release includes those 1,536 re-interviewed panel cases along with the 2,023 cases. Please note that this is not a cumulative file - those cases and variables not surveyed in 2008 are excluded. Also note that, although those 1,536 cases were from the 2006 sample, this release does not include their responses in 2006. We plan to release a data file with the previous responses in the future. This release introduces new variables that were asked only of the panel cases of the 2008 GSS. The majority of variables introduced are related to the 2007 International Social Survey Program (ISSP) module on leisure time and sports.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 12/14/2009
  • National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, 2012, and 2018-2019):
    The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations. Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the 1998 NCS data was the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. Subsequent NCS waves were conducted in 2006-07, 2012, and 2018-19. The 2006-07 NCS sample includes a subset of cases that were also interviewed in 1998. The 2012 NCS includes an oversample of Hispanic congregations. The 2018-19 NCS includes a subset of congregations that also were interviewed in 2012. The NCS Wave I-II Panel Dataset is also available from the ARDA. The Wave III-IV Panel Dataset will be available soon.
    Funded By: The National Congregations Study (NCS) was made possible by major grants from Lilly Endowment, Inc. The 1998 NCS also was supported by grants from the Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., Louisville Institute, Nonprofit Sector Research Fund of the Aspen Institute, and Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. The 2006-07 NCS also was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation , Kellogg Foundation, and Louisville Institute. The 2012 NCS also was supported by grants from the Pew Research Center's Religion and Public Life Project , Louisville Institute, Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at IUPUI, Rand Corporation, and Church Music Institute. The 2012 NCS also received generous support from Duke University and from the National Science Foundation via NSF support of the General Social Survey . The 2018-19 NCS also was supported by grants from the John Templeton Foundation , Louisville Institute, and Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life. The National Science Foundation supported the 2018-19 NCS via the module competition that subsidized including questions about respondents' congregations on the 2018 General Social Survey .
    Collected: 2019, Uploaded 10/16/2020
  • Houston Area Survey, 1982-2010:
    For the past 28 years, these countywide, random-digit-dialed, computer-assisted telephone surveys have systematically measured the continuities and changes in demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes and beliefs among successive representative samples of Harris County residents. Using identical items across the years, with new questions added periodically, the annual Houston Area Survey (HAS) has tracked America's fourth largest city in the process of fundamental transformation.

    Houston recovered from deep recession in the 1980s to find itself squarely in the midst of a restructured economy and a demographic revolution. New economic, educational, and environmental challenges have redefined the "pro-growth" strategies required for urban prosperity in the twenty-first century. At the same time, major immigration flows have transformed Houston into one of the nation's most culturally diverse metropolitan areas, at the center of the transformations that are refashioning the social and political landscape of urban America. The overall purpose of this continuing project is to measure systematically the way area residents are responding to these remarkable changes, and to make the findings of this research widely available to the general public and to research scholars everywhere.

    Conducted annually during February and March, the interviews measure perspectives on the local and national economies, on poverty programs, interethnic relationships, and the new immigration; beliefs about discrimination and affirmative action, about education, crime, health care, taxation, and community service; assessments of downtown development, mobility and transit, land-use controls, and environmental concerns; attitudes toward abortion, homosexuality, and other aspects of "the social agenda." They record religious and political orientations, as well as a rich array of demographic and immigration characteristics, socioeconomic indicators, and family structures.
    Funded By: AT&T Foundation, Gallery Furniture, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Houston Chronicle, Houston Endowment Inc., Swalm Foundation, United Way of Greater Houston, Vinson & Elkins L.L.P., Amegy Bank, Bank of America, CenterPoint Energy, Fiesta Mart, H-E-B Company, Jain & Jain CPAs, JPMorganChase-Houston, KHOU-TV Channel 11, Memorial Hermann Hospital System, Palmetto Partners Ltd., Pinto America Growth Fund L.P., Sterling Bank, Wachovia Foundation, Wells Fargo, American Leadership Forum, Houston/Gulf Coast Chapter, BMC Software Inc., Center for, Houston's Future, Compass Bank, CRC Foundation, Deloitte & Touche, The Everett Family Fund, Fulbright & Jaworski L.L.P., Group 1 Automotive Inc., Hines Interests Limited Partnership, Houston Rockets, Indo-American Charity Foundation, Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston, Jacob and Terese Hershey Foundation, KTRK-TV Channel 13, Leadership Houston, Linbeck Group L.P., Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell L.L.P, Lovett Homes Inc., Management Leadership for, Tomorrow-Houston, Marek Brothers Systems Inc, Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw L.L.P., Merrill Lynch, MetroNational,, Reliant Energy, Shell Oil Company Foundation, Stanford and Joan Alexander Foundation, State Farm Insurance, Companies, Texas Children's Hospital, Waste Management Inc., Whitney National Bank, Wulfe and Co., F. J. Hank, Coleman, Jr., Janice M. Crawford, John Walsh, The Honorable Bob Lanier, Linda L. S. Moroney, Eugene Vaughan
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/3/2010
  • National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset (1998, 2006-2007, 2012, and 2018-2019) - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original National Congregations Study, Cumulative Dataset, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories and added as additional variables to the file. The National Congregations Study (NCS) dataset fills a void in the sociological study of congregations by providing data that can be used to draw a nationally aggregate picture of congregations. Thanks to innovations in sampling techniques, the 1998 NCS data was the first nationally representative sample of American congregations. Subsequent NCS waves were conducted in 2006-07, 2012, and 2018-19. The 2006-07 NCS sample includes a subset of cases that were also interviewed in 1998. The 2012 NCS includes an oversample of Hispanic congregations. The 2018-19 NCS includes a subset of congregations that also were interviewed in 2012. The NCS Wave I-II Panel Dataset is also available from the ARDA. The Wave III-IV Panel Dataset will be available soon.
    Funded By: The National Congregations Study (NCS) was made possible by major grants from Lilly Endowment, Inc. The 1998 NCS also was supported by grants from the Smith Richardson Foundation, Inc., Louisville Institute, Nonprofit Sector Research Fund of the Aspen Institute, and Henry Luce Foundation, Inc. The 2006-07 NCS also was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation , Kellogg Foundation, and Louisville Institute. The 2012 NCS also was supported by grants from the Pew Research Center's Religion and Public Life Project , Louisville Institute, Center for the Study of Religion and American Culture at IUPUI, Rand Corporation, and Church Music Institute. The 2012 NCS also received generous support from Duke University and from the National Science Foundation via NSF support of the General Social Survey . The 2018-19 NCS also was supported by grants from the John Templeton Foundation , Louisville Institute, and Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life. The National Science Foundation supported the 2018-19 NCS via the module competition that subsidized including questions about respondents' congregations on the 2018 General Social Survey .
    Collected: 2019, Uploaded 10/16/2020
  • General Social Survey, 2002:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 2002 GSS include questions on religious self-identification, denominational affiliation, church attendance, personal beliefs, and religious upbringing.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 11/17/2003
  • General Social Survey, 2000:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 2000 GSS include a module on religion (with items measuring religious self-identification, religious schooling, congregational affiliation, church attendance, and local church performance).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 4/12/2002
  • General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing):
    This file differs from the General Social Survey 2012 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 3/17/2014
  • General Social Survey 2012 Cross-Section and Panel Combined - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2012 General Social Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2012 GSS. There are a total of 4,820 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2012 GSS featured special modules on religious scriptures, the environment, dance and theater performances, health care system, government involvement, health concerns, emotional health, financial independence and income inequality.

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. This file has a rolling panel design, with the 2008 GSS as the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2008 was selected for reinterview in 2010 and again in 2012 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2010 GSS consisted of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2008. The 2012 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 1,974, the first reinterview wave of the 2010 panel cases with 1,551 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2008 panel with 1,295 completed cases. Altogether, the 2012 GSS had 4,820 cases (1,974 in the new 2012 panel, 1,551 in the 2010 panel, and 1,295 in the 2008 panel).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 10/9/2014
  • General Social Survey, 2018 - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2018 General Social Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2018, Uploaded 3/23/2020
  • General Social Survey, 1990:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 1990 GSS includes the Survey's usual set of items on religion, such as religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about the Bible, attitudes toward organized religion and its opponents, and others. In addition, it contains a special module examining respondents' images of God.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC)
    Collected: 1990, Uploaded 9/19/2008
  • General Social Survey, 1996:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about the Bible, attitudes toward organized religion and its opponents, and more. In addition, it contains a special module examining respondents' images of God. The survey also contains topical modules on national identity, the role of government, and mental health.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 11/10/2008
  • General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2014 General Social Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2014 GSS. There are a total of 3,842 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2014, Uploaded 12/7/2015
  • National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico, Religious Minorities:
    The Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL) and the National Council to Prevent Discrimination developed the National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico to assess the amount of discrimination in the everyday lives of Mexican citizens. Specifically, SEDESOL wanted to analyze the problem from the perspectives of the general population and from specific vulnerable populations. For this reason, the survey developed seven different questionnaires: a general questionnaire for the general population and six separate questionnaires for targeted vulnerable populations. These targeted vulnerable populations included: a) population of elderly people, b) indigenous population, c) population with non-Catholic religious beliefs, d) female population, e) people with disabilities, and f) individuals with non-heterosexual preferences, which became a case study due to the difficulty covering that specific targeted population.

    This dataset examines the responses of 789 individuals with non-Catholic religious beliefs in Mexico. These religious minorities were asked questions regarding the following: general views on discrimination; whether or not they have experienced discrimination based on their religious beliefs; whether or not Catholics have more privileges in society; what action should be taken to prevent religious discrimination; the role of government in preventing discrimination toward religious minorities; the life opportunities of religious minorities; their views on other vulnerable populations; and whether or not discrimination toward religious minorities has changed over the years. The methodology, questionnaire, and responses in the dataset were translated from Spanish into English.
    Funded By: Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL)
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 1/25/2013
  • General Social Survey Panel Data (2016-2020):
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 2016-2020 GSS consisted of re-interviews of respondents from the 2016 and 2018 Cross-Sectional GSS rounds. All respondents from 2018 were fielded, but a random subsample of the respondents from 2016 were released for the 2020 panel. Cross-sectional responses from 2016 and 2018 are labelled Waves 1A and 1B, respectively, while responses from the 2020 re-interviews are labelled Wave 2.

    The 2016-2020 GSS Wave 2 Panel also includes a collaboration between the General Social Survey (GSS) and the American National Election Studies (ANES). The 2016-2020 GSS Panel Wave 2 contained a module of items proposed by the ANES team, including attitudinal questions, feelings thermometers for presidential candidates, and plans for voting in the 2020 presidential election. These respondents appear in both the ANES post-election study and the 2016-2020 GSS panel, with their 2020 GSS responses serving as their equivalent pre-election data. Researchers can link the relevant GSS Panel Wave 2 data with ANES post-election data using either ANESID (in the GSS Panel Wave 2 datafile) or V200001 in the ANES 2020 post-election datafile.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2020, Uploaded 6/30/2022
  • General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing):
    This file differs from the General Social Survey 2010 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2010 GSS. There are a total of 4,901 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2010 GSS featured special modules on aging, the Internet, shared capitalism, gender roles, intergroup relations, immigration, meeting spouse, knowledge about and attitudes toward science, religious identity, religious trends, genetics, veterans, crime and victimization, social networks and group membership, and sexual behavior (continuing the series started in 1988).

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. The 2006 GSS was the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2006 was selected for reinterview in 2008 and again in 2010 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2008 GSS consists of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2006. The 2010 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 2,044, the first reinterview wave of the 2,023 2008 panel cases with 1,581 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2006 panel with 1,276 completed cases. Altogether, the 2010 GSS had 4,901 cases (2,044 in the new 2010 panel, 1,581 in the 2008 panel, and 1,276 in the 2006 panel). The 2010 GSS is the first round to fully implement the new, rolling panel design. In 2012 and later GSSs, there will likewise be a fresh cross-section (wave one of a new panel), wave two panel cases from the immediately preceding GSS, and wave three panel cases from the next earlier GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 3/17/2014
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1996:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 9/19/2008
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1993:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about political preference, comparisons of Southerners and non-Southerners, interaction with family members, values which are taught to children, leisure activities, care for the environment, Southern food, and basic demographic information.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1993, Uploaded 5/25/2012
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1993:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about political preference, comparisons of Southerners and non-Southerners, interaction with family members, values which are taught to children, leisure activities, care for the environment, Southern food, and basic demographic information.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1993, Uploaded 5/25/2012
  • Muslim American Survey, 2007:
    In 2007, the Pew Research Center conducted what is believed to be the first-ever national telephone survey of a probability sample of Muslim Americans, a rare, dispersed, and highly diverse population. The study examined the political and social values, religious beliefs and practices, and life experiences of Muslims living in the U.S. today. The survey also contrasts the views of the Muslim population as a whole with those of the U.S. general population, and with the attitudes of Muslims all around the world, including Western Europe. Finally, findings from the survey make important contributions to the debate over the total size of the Muslim American population.
    Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 11/16/2009
  • General Social Survey, 1988:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 1988 GSS include a special module on religion (with items measuring religious socialization, behaviors, and beliefs).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC)
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 12/12/2000
  • General Social Survey, 1991:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about the Bible, attitudes toward organized religion and its opponents, and more. In addition, it contains a special module examining respondents' images of God. The survey also contains a topical module on work organizations.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC)
    Collected: 1991, Uploaded 11/16/2009
  • American National Election Studies, 2002:
    The NES/CPS American National Election Studies 2002 was conducted by the Center for Political Studies of the Institute for Social Research , under the general direction of Principal Investigators Nancy Burns and Donald R. Kinder. Dozens of substantive themes are covered including: interest in political campaigns, attentiveness to media coverage, and political participation. In this data file, variables 226 through 233 and variables 312 through 316 include indicators on religiosity, congregational affiliation, and church attendance. Respondents were also asked about financial contributions to their church (variable 685). For more information, go to: https://electionstudies.org/data-center/2002-time-series-study/
    Funded By: These materials are based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant numbers SBR-9707741, SBR-9317631, SES-9209410, SES-9009379, SES-8808361, SES-8341310, SES-8207580, and SOC77-08885, as well as the Russell Sage Foundation under grant number 82-00-01, and the University of Michigan .
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 11/17/2003
  • Taiwan Social Change Survey, 2009:
    The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed five-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world.

    The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS) . In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community. This survey is the fifth phase and fifth wave of Questionnaire II: Religion.
    Funded By: National Science Council & Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2013
  • Taiwan Social Change Survey, 1994:
    "The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. As of 2006, the TSCS had accumulated 37 surveys. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world...

    "The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS) . In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community." (Source: Methodology notes provided by Academia Sinica.) This survey is the second phase and fifth wave of Questionnaire 2.
    Funded By: National Science Council & Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 6/29/2007
  • Taiwan Social Change Survey, 2004:
    "The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. As of 2006, the TSCS had accumulated 37 surveys. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world...

    "The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS). In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community." (Source: Methodology notes provided by Academia Sinica .) This survey is the fourth phase and fifth wave of Questionnaire 2.
    Funded By: National Science Council & Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 6/29/2007
  • General Social Survey, 1998:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 1998 GSS include special modules on religion (with items measuring giving, volunteering, religious self-identification, religious schooling, congregational affiliation, and spiritualism), culture, job experiences, inter-racial friendships, national security, medical care, medical ethics, and the social security system.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 1998, Uploaded 12/20/2000
  • National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico, Elderly Population:
    The Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL) and the National Council to Prevent Discrimination developed the National Survey on Discrimination in Mexico to assess the amount of discrimination in the everyday lives of Mexican citizens. Specifically, SEDESOL wanted to analyze the problem from the perspectives of the general population and from specific vulnerable populations. For this reason, the survey developed seven different questionnaires: a general questionnaire for the general population and six separate questionnaires for targeted vulnerable populations. These targeted vulnerable populations included: a) population of elderly people, b) indigenous population, c) population with non-Catholic religious beliefs, d) female population, e) people with disabilities, and f) individuals with non-heterosexual preferences, which became a case study due to the difficulty covering that specific targeted population.

    This dataset examines the responses of 761 individuals among the elderly population in Mexico. These individuals were asked questions regarding the following: general views on discrimination; how they feel society generally treats them; whether or not they have experienced discrimination based on their age; what action should be taken to prevent elderly discrimination; the role of government in preventing discrimination towards the elderly population; the life opportunities of the elderly; their views on other vulnerable populations; and whether or not discrimination towards the elderly has changed over the years. The methodology, questionnaire, and responses in the dataset were translated from Spanish into English.
    Funded By: The Secretary of Social Development (SEDESOL)
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 1/25/2013
  • Global Restrictions on Religion Data:
    In December 2009, Pew Research Center released "Global Restrictions on Religion," the first in a series of annual reports on a data-coding project that seeks to measure levels of government restrictions on religion and social hostilities involving religion around the world. As of February 2015, Pew Research had published six reports on global restrictions on religion, analyzing a total of seven years' worth of data (the first two reports covered a total of three years, from 2007 to 2009). [...] In order to provide social science researchers and the general public with easier access to the data, Pew Research Center has released the full dataset.

    The data are presented as a long-format dataset, in which each row is a country-year observation (for example, "Afghanistan, 2007"). The columns contain all of the variables presented in Pew Research Center's annual reports on restrictions on religion, as well as some additional variables analyzed in separate studies. The dataset contains data from 2007 through 2013; as additional years of data are coded, the dataset will be updated.

    The codebook proceeds in three parts. First, it explains the methodology and coding procedures used to collect the data. Second it discusses the Government Restrictions Index and Social Hostilities Index, including what they measure and how they are calculated. Finally, it describes each of the variables included in the dataset, along with answer values and definitions of key terms.
    Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 3/21/2016
  • American National Election Studies, 2000:
    This study is the twenty-sixth in a series of national election studies produced by the Center for Political Studies and the Survey Research Center. The 2000 American National Election Studies entailed both a pre-election interview and a post-election re-interview. Hundreds of substantive themes are covered including: interest in political campaigns, attentiveness to media coverage, political participation and knowledge of the religious background of Presidential and Vice Presidential candidates. In this data file, variables 892 through 920 include indicators on religiosity, congregational affiliation, and church attendance. Local church activities with regard to politics are also included in the questionnaire. Finally, several new concepts in the 2000 study included questions designed to evaluate social trust, social networks and political knowledge. The NES/CPS American National Election Studies 2000 was conducted by the Center for Political Studies of the Institute for Social Research, under the general direction of Principal Investigators Nancy Burns and Donald R. Kinder.
    Funded By: These materials are based on work supported by the National Science Foundation under grant numbers SBR-9707741, SBR-9317631, SES-9209410, SES-9009379, SES-8808361, SES-8341310, SES-8207580, and SOC77-08885, as well as the Russell Sage Foundation under grant number 82-00-01, and the University of Michigan .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 4/12/2002
  • General Social Survey, 2016, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing):
    This file differs from the General Social Survey 2016 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2016 GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2016, Uploaded 4/9/2018
  • Taiwan Social Change Survey, 1985:
    "The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. As of 2006, the TSCS had accumulated 37 surveys. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world....

    "The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS) . In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community." (Source: Methodology notes provided by Academia Sinica.) The 1985 Taiwan Social Change Survey is the first phase and first wave of Questionnaire 2.
    Funded By: National Science Council & Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica
    Collected: 1985, Uploaded 6/29/2007
  • General Social Survey, 1976:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion in the 1976 GSS include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about life after death, and attitudes toward organized religion.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 1976, Uploaded 8/13/2010
  • General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing):
    This file differs from the General Social Survey 2014 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2014 GSS. There are a total of 3,842 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2014, Uploaded 4/3/2017
  • General Social Survey, 2016 - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2016 General Social Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2016, Uploaded 9/7/2018
  • General Social Survey, 1980:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion in the 1980 GSS include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about life after death, and attitudes toward organized religion. In addition, the 1980 GSS contains a module on voluntary organization membership, including a measure of membership in church-affiliated groups.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC)
    Collected: 1980, Uploaded 1/27/2010
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1994:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; food; Southern expressions; celebrating holidays; geneology; views concerning the US civil war; religion; vehicles.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 9/7/2012
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1994:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; race relations; religion; the role of congregations in society; morality; cultural issues; gender roles; health and exercise; cultural and leisure activities.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 9/7/2012
  • General Social Survey, 1978:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion in the 1980 GSS include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about life after death, and attitudes toward organized religion. In addition, the 1978 GSS contains a module on voluntary organization membership, including a measure of membership in church-affiliated groups. The 1978 GSS also contains a special module of items examining how often respondents and their friends think about certain topics, including abortion laws.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 1978, Uploaded 8/13/2010
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1994:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; food; Southern expressions; celebrating holidays; geneology; views concerning the US civil war; religion; vehicles.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 9/7/2012
  • Taiwan Social Change Survey, 1999:
    Of the Taiwan Social Change Surveys, this particular survey file is the third phase and fifth wave of Questionnaire 2. "The Taiwan Social Change Survey (TSCS) tracks the long-term trend of social changes through national representative survey data. Since the first nation-wide survey completed in 1985, this cross-sectional survey project has followed 5-year cycles that rotate selective modules. These modules cover various topics including family, religion, stratification, mass communication, and political participation. As of 2006, the TSCS had accumulated 37 surveys. Many of these surveys carry repetitive modules that have run through up to four cycles of survey operations, which enable researchers to understand social change from longitudinal perspectives. With more than 80,000 face-to-face interviews completed over the past 22 years, the TSCS has become the largest survey series among all of the general social surveys in the world.

    "The TSCS team also initiates and participates in international comparative surveys. Since 2001, the TSCS has been an active member in both the International Social Survey Programme (ISSP) and the East Asian Social Survey (EASS) . In the wave of the globalization of social surveys, not only will the TSCS continue to cover its major national research agenda, but it also will aim to present and demonstrate the characteristics of Taiwanese social changes by incorporating both ISSP and EASS modules into the surveys. Such a combination of local, regional, and global research interests should preserve the tradition of the TSCS while it expands into the international community." (Source: Methodology notes provided by Academia Sinica.)
    Funded By: National Science Council & Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 6/15/2007
  • ISPU American Muslim Poll, 2019:
    SSRS conducted a survey of Muslims, Jews and the General Population for the Institute for Social Policy and Understanding from January 8 through January 28, 2019. The study investigated the opinions of Muslims, Jews and the General Population regarding the government, the most important issues facing the country, faith customs and religious/race/gender discrimination.
    Funded By: Institute for Social Policy and Understanding
    Collected: 2019, Uploaded 12/18/2020
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1993:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about political preferences, family life, childhood socialization, gender relations, household division of labor, Southern culture, religious involvement, and demographic characteristics.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1993, Uploaded 5/25/2012
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; characteristics of U.S. regions; word use; accents; race relations; immigration; cigarette smoking; NFL teams.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 4/25/2013
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1996:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 2/6/2009
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1996:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 2/6/2009
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 2001:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 9/8/2006
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1999:
    "Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll" (Odum Institute).

    Southern and non-Southern residents are surveyed yearly and "are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues such as Southern accent, the Confederate flag and "Dixie"; race relations; feelings toward migrants to the South; and characteristics of Southerners vs. Northerners" (Odum Institute).

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution .
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 2/2/2007
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 2000:
    "Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll" (Odum Institute).

    Southern and non-Southern residents are surveyed yearly and "are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues such as Southern accent, the Confederate flag and 'Dixie;' race relations; feelings toward migrants to the South; and characteristics of Southerners vs. Northerners" (Odum Institute).

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill ; and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 2/2/2007
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2095 Piazza, Terrorism Suspect Religious Identity and Support for Controversial Practices:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    The following study executes a survey experiment involving four treatment vignettes and one control vignette and 17 survey questions administered to 1,135 respondents. Respondents are randomly assigned to one of the five treatments which depict a short AP newswire blurb describing an arrest of two terrorist suspects in suburban Chicago. The treatments are identical to one another except they vary the names of the suspects (stereotypical Arabic/Muslim vs. Anglo-American) and the names of the terrorist movement the suspects are alleged to be members of (radical Islamists vs. right-wing American extremist). The control vignette omits any identification of the suspect names or groups. All respondents are then asked 13 questions rating their support for / approval of controversial interrogation and detention practices (10 interrogation practices, including the use of physical abuse of suspects, and three detention practices, including indefinite detention of suspects) that have been used by U.S. counterterrorism officials since the 9/11 terrorist attacks.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 1/16/2015
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2028 Johns, Civilian Casualties and Support for War:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This experiment examines how the social/political conditions of a target country and the number of estimated casualties affect the support for attacking the target country. This project includes two vignette-based survey experiments. Each involves random assignment to a relatively large number of conditions (i.e., different vignettes): 12 in the case of Experiment 1 and 16 in the case of Experiment 2:

    Experiment 1-- A. Target state is hypothetical. B. Variables manipulated: political nature of target state (democracy or dictatorship); dominant faith of target state (Islamic or Christian); and anticipated civilian death toll (no mention or 100 or 3,000). C. Number of total conditions: 12.

    Experiment 2 -- A. Target state is Iran. B. Variables manipulated: anticipated civilian death toll (50 or 500 or 5,000 or 50,000); framing of civilian casualties ('civilian casualties' or 'innocent Iranians dying, many of them women and children'); and anticipated success (delay nuclear program in Iran by a year or delay by 10 years). C. Number of total conditions: 16.

    The order of the two experiments is randomized across respondents (e.g., half doing Experiment 1 first and half doing Experiment 2 first).
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/13/2015
  • Pew 2011 National Survey of Mormons:
    Over the years, numerous polls have gauged public attitudes toward Mormons, who make up about two percent of all U.S. adults. But what do Mormons themselves think about their place in American life? With the rising prominence of members of the LDS Church in politics, popular culture and the media, do Mormons feel more secure and accepted in American society? What do they think of other religions? What do they believe, how do they practice their faith and what do they see as essential to being a good Mormon and to leading a good life?

    To answer such questions, the Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life conducted the 2011 National Survey of Mormons. A report detailing the survey's findings, "Mormons in America," was released in January, 2012 and is available on the Forum's website here .

    The study had two main goals. First, it sought to learn about Mormons' perceptions of American society and of their own place within it at a time when Mormons and Mormonism are receiving increased attention in the news media and popular culture. Second, it sought to assess the degree to which Mormons resemble or are distinctive from the broader public in their social and political attitudes and in their religious beliefs and practices. As such, the survey included a mix of new questions specific to Mormons and Mormonism and "trend" questions that have previously been asked of the general population in Pew Research Center surveys. The development of the survey questionnaire was informed by the advice and feedback received from a panel of advisers with expertise in the study of the U.S. Mormon population.
    Funded By: Pew Research Center's Forum on Religion & Public Life
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 2/13/2015
  • The Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2017:
    The Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2017 was a cooperative research endeavor, organized by the Paul B. Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics at Calvin College, that focused on the social characteristics, theological beliefs, civic endeavors, and political attitudes and behavior of American clergy. The project was a cooperative endeavor, with different participants examining clergy from a specific denomination, generally a denomination of which they were either a part of or with which they were very familiar. The group utilized a common questionnaire, which largely replicated the questionnaire used in the Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2001 and 2009 (the data for which are also housed at ARDA). Participants funded the data collection and data entry costs related to their particular denomination they surveyed, with the data from each denomination or faith tradition then being pooled together to create a combined data file.

    In the end, 2,502 clergy from the following denominations were surveyed: the Assemblies of God (AOG); the Christian Reformed Church in North American (CRC); the Disciples of Christ (DOC); the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA); the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod (LCMS); the Mennonite Church, USA; the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. (PCUSA); the Reformed Church in America (RCA); the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC); and, the United Methodist Church (UMC). Those participating in the project mailed the questionnaire to a random sample of clergy from the denomination they chose to study. The sample size varied from denomination to denomination, with larger denominations generally having larger sample sizes. The response rate varied by denomination, with smaller denominations generally having higher response rates. Details related to those researching each denomination are presented below.
    Funded By: The Henry Institute at Calvin College
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 2/28/2020
  • The Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2009:
    The Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2009 was a cooperative research endeavor, organized by the Paul B. Henry Institute for the Study of Christianity and Politics at Calvin College, that focused on the social characteristics, theological beliefs, civic endeavors, and political attitudes and behavior of American clergy. The project was a cooperative endeavor, with different participants examining clergy from a specific denomination, generally a denomination of which they were either a part of or with which they were very familiar. The group utilized a common questionnaire which largely replicated the questionnaire used in the Cooperative Clergy Study Project of 2001 (the data for which are also housed at ARDA). Participants funded the data collection and data entry costs related to their particular denomination they surveyed, with the data from each denomination or faith tradition then being pooled together to create a combined data file.

    In the end, 3,196 clergy from the following denominations were surveyed: the Assemblies of God (AOG); the Christian Reformed Church in North American (CRC); the Disciples of Christ (DOC); the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America (ELCA); the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod (LCMS); the Mennonite Church, USA; the Presbyterian Church, U.S.A. (PCUSA); the Reformed Church in America (RCA); the Southern Baptist Convention (SBC); and, the United Methodist Church (UMC). Those participating in the project mailed the questionnaire to a random sample of clergy from the denomination they chose to study. The sample size varied from denomination to denomination, with larger denominations generally having larger sample sizes. The response rate varied by denomination, with smaller denominations generally having higher response rates. Details related to those researching each denomination are presented below. The specific sample size employed and the response rate obtained are found in Appendix A of this document .
    Funded By: The Henry Institute at Calvin College
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/8/2019
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; demographic characteristics; the 1996 Olympics; Atlanta; the effectiveness of various government agencies; defining characteristics of the South; food.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 4/25/2013
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 2000:
    "Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. And few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the [Odum] Institute and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor the Southern Focus Poll" (Odum Institute).

    Southern and non-Southern residents are surveyed yearly and "are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues such as Southern accent, the Confederate flag and 'Dixie;' race relations; feelings toward migrants to the South; and characteristics of Southerners vs. Northerners" (Odum Institute).

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; the Center for the Study of the American South at the University of North Carolina - Chapel Hill; and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 3/20/2009
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, 1999:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science conducts a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 3/20/2009
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1998:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1998, Uploaded 11/11/1999
  • General Social Survey, 1994:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 1994 GSS featured special modules on family mobility and multiculturalism. Items on religion cover denominational affiliation, church attendance, religious upbringing, personal beliefs, and religious experiences.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 9/24/2010
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2010:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2010 NASIS asks questions about current issues, nursing homes and assisted living facilities, personal finances, survey participation, as well as general demographic and household information.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 1/19/2018
  • Orange & San Diego Catholic Priest Survey: Religion and Politics, 2001:
    This is a survey on the religious and political views of Catholic priests in the Dioceses of San Diego and Orange, California. It was constructed both with original questions and questions derived from the National Election Study, General Social Survey, and Ted G. Jelen's The Political World of the Clergy.
    Funded By: The Jack and Suzie Peltason Fellowship through the Department of Political Science, University of California, Irvine UCI Research Opportunity Program
    Collected: 2001, Uploaded 10/23/2009
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1992:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about the then-current presidential election, Southern women, food, government's use of taxes, and pornography.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1992, Uploaded 2/24/2012
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1998:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1998, Uploaded 11/11/1999
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1997:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 11/11/1999
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2042 Creighton, Perceptions of Islam, Migration, and Citizenship in the United States:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This list experiment tests whether views toward immigrants depend on whether the immigrant group shares the same religion as the respondent. Since traditional survey methods may be more prone to social desirability bias, an experimental design is necessary. In this study, respondents are divided between a control group and, in this case, two treatment groups. The control group is just asked three questions unrelated to immigration. The first treatment group is asked the original three questions, but with an additional question pertaining to Muslim immigrants. The second treatment group is asked the original three questions, but with an additional question pertaining to Christian immigrants. In its most basic incarnation, the comparison of the mean of the responses to the control list with the mean of the responses to each of the treatments offers an estimate of the proportion opposed to the additional list item.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/13/2015
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS73 Djupe, The Political Impact of Message Attributes from Religious Elites:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    The study focuses on the affect religious attributes may have on messages about global warming. Respondents will receive information about 1) the religious affiliation of a public official and 2) the way he made his decision to take a stance on global warming. This is a 2x2 between subject design, where the first factor is the source cue (Present/Absent) and the second factor is the decision process (Present/Absent). In total, there are four conditions and respondents are assigned with equal probabilities.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 9/19/2014
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2047 Thornton, Understanding the Role of Religious Appeals in Political Communication:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    The following 2X2 experiment examines the concept of religious priming as well as the potential for political awareness to moderate discernible priming effects. The study follows a 2 (Religious Cues: Present, Absent) x 2 (Prior Information: Present, Absent) between subjects factorial design, with pretest and posttest questions. Religious cues are manipulated by providing respondents with a political advertisement including or excluding religious appeals. The second factor manipulates awareness, specifically how much information participants know about the political candidate's policy preferences. As such, participants will be randomly assigned to one of four experimental conditions (Information-Present, Cue-Present; Information-Present, Cue-Absent; Information-Absent, Cue-Present; Information-Absent, Cue-Absent). The information condition is simply whether one receives a one page pdf bio of the candidate; the religious cue condition is whether one receives a political ad with or without religious cues.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 1/16/2015
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1992:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1992, Uploaded 2/24/2012
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS16 Glazier, Providential Religious Beliefs and U.S. Foreign Policy:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This study uses a 2X3 experimental study design to examine how religious frames of natural disasters and political crises may influence the support for government intervention. There are a total of six experimental conditions. The first three experimental conditions deal with a hypothetical foreign policy speech regarding government intervention in a foreign natural disaster. One condition is unframed, another condition frames it as a responsibility to international agreement, and the last condition frames the issue as a religious duty as a blessed nation. Another set of three conditions deal with a hypothetical foreign policy speech regarding government intervention in a foreign political crisis. One condition is unframed, another condition frames it as a responsibility to international agreement, and the last condition frames the issue as a religious duty as a blessed nation. Through this experiment, we can examine the effects of civil religion.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 9/19/2014
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2104 Singer, The Effect of Question Wording on Preferences for Genetic Testing and Abortion:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This question-wording experiment was designed to see whether using the term "fetus" rather than "baby" to ask questions would alter public preferences about prenatal testing for genetic defects and for abortion if a test revealed such defects. From 1990 through 2010, the GSS questions about prenatal testing and abortion were framed in terms of "baby" - for example: "Today, tests are being developed that make it possible to detect serious genetic defects before a baby is born." After the 2010 results were released, some researchers questioned whether the answers might have been different had the questions been framed in terms of "fetus" rather than "baby" because the word "fetus" may carry a more abstract, impersonal connotation than "baby" and might therefore lead to more frequent expressions of preferences for prenatal testing and abortion. To resolve this issue and provide guidance for future administrations of these questions in the GSS, the investigators designed a question-wording experiment fielded by TESS.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 1/16/2015
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1992:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about the then-current presidential election, Southern women, food, government's use of taxes, and pornography.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1992, Uploaded 2/24/2012
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS101 Lee, Cultural Affinities, Regime Type, and Foreign Policy Opinion Formation:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This experiment explores the role of region-specific cultural biases on individual citizens' perceptions of security threats and seeks to disentangle this effect from the impact of knowledge of regime type. In two different scenarios, the type of government of a given country (democratic/non-democratic) and the religion of a given group (Christianity/Islam/Hinduism) are rotated for each experimental condition (six total conditions, two different scenarios). Respondent's assignment to versions of the two scenarios is independent. In other words, there are two separate randomizations to one of six conditions, one for each scenario. The first scenario (Scenario A) deals with an international terrorist organization and the second scenario (Scenario B) deals with a foreign country developing nuclear weapons.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 9/19/2014
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1994:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; race relations; religion; the role of congregations in society; morality; cultural issues; gender roles; health and exercise; cultural and leisure activities.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 9/7/2012
  • Endtime Family (Children of God), 1997:
    The Endtime Family, or Children of God, data set is an examination of a religious group that is in high tension with its surrounding environment. This data set assesses the validity of applying survey data techniques to high tension religious groups. Additionally, most of the variables are replications of variables from the General Social Survey (GSS) and some variables are replications from the International Social Survey Program , enabling comparisons between the Endtime Family and the general population.
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 3/22/2001
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1993:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about political preferences, family life, childhood socialization, gender relations, household division of labor, Southern culture, religious involvement, and demographic characteristics.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1993, Uploaded 5/25/2012
  • PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, July 2012:
    The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward technology. Questions explored the frequency of using social media for religious practice, use of technology during worship services, and a general connection between religion and technology.
    Funded By: Public Religion Research Institute
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 5/23/2016
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2007 - The Mission Work Plan of the General Assembly Council, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2007 survey focuses on the Mission Work Plan of the General Assembly Council.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 5/31/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2007 - The Mission Work Plan of the General Assembly Council, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2007 survey focuses on the Mission Work Plan of the General Assembly Council.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 5/31/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2007 - The Mission Work Plan of the General Assembly Council, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2007 survey focuses on the Mission Work Plan of the General Assembly Council.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 5/31/2011
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2007 - The Mission Work Plan of the General Assembly Council, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. The 3,742 member panel consists of 1,099 members, 1,164 elders and 1,469 clergy. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2007 survey focuses on the Mission Work Plan of the General Assembly Council.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 5/31/2011
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; characteristics of U.S. regions; word use; accents; race relations; immigration; cigarette smoking; NFL teams.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 4/25/2013
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; demographic characteristics; the 1996 Olympics; Atlanta; the effectiveness of various government agencies; defining characteristics of the South; food.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 4/25/2013
  • Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Spring 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; demographic characteristics; the 1996 Olympics; Atlanta; the effectiveness of various government agencies; defining characteristics of the South; food.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 8/2/2013
  • SGI-USA Membership Survey, 1997:
    After the success of a survey of British Soka Gakkai, a Japanese based religion (a form of Buddhism), a counterpart survey in the United States was undertaken. Many of the items included in the U.S. survey (SGIUSA) reproduced questions from the National Opinion Research Center's General Social Survey (GSS) , making direct comparisons possible between members of Soka Gakkai and the general American public. Other questions reproduced items included in the survey of SGI members in the United Kingdom. Consequently, this survey provides one of the most comprehensive surveys of an alternative religion in the United States, a survey which is comparable to both a similar sample in the United Kingdom and the general population of the United States.
    Funded By: Boston Research Center for the 21st Century
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 5/15/2003
  • General Social Survey, 1993:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about the Bible, attitudes toward organized religion and its opponents, and more. The survey also contains a topical module on culture.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC)
    Collected: 1993, Uploaded 9/24/2010
  • Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Fall 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; characteristics of U.S. regions; word use; accents; race relations; immigration; cigarette smoking; NFL teams.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 8/2/2013
  • Project Canada 1985-90 Panel Study:
    The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge . National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.
    Funded By: The 1975 survey was carried out for a cost of about $14,000 and had four major sources: the United Church of Canada ($2,000), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ($3,000), the Solicitor General of Canada ($5,000), and the University of Lethbridge ($4,000). In 1980, the panel portion of the survey was made possible by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($10,000) and the United Church of Canada ($2,000). The second phase of Project Canada 1980, which involved filling the core out into a full national sample, cost approximately $8,000 and was funded primarily by the University of Lethbridge. Project Canada 1985 was funded completely by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($45,000); Project Canada 1990 and Project Canada 1995 were both funded by The Lilly Endowment, Inc. (about $65,000 each).
    Collected: 1990, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Youth Component:
    The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different, 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and on behavior.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , with 13 participating national youth-serving organizations (African Methodist Episcopal Church, American Lutheran Church, Baptist General Conference, Churches of God-General Conference, Evangelical Covenant Church, 4-H Extension, Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, National Associations of Homes for Children, National Catholic Educational Association, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A), Southern Baptist Convention, United Church of Christ, United Methodist Church)
    Collected: 1984, Uploaded 10/19/1999
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2004 - Energy Issues, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The August 2004 survey focuses on Energy Issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 1/27/2010
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2004 - Presbyterian Colleges and Universities, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The February 2004 survey focuses on Presbyterian Colleges and Universities.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 11/16/2009
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2004 - Presbyterian Colleges and Universities, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The February 2004 survey focuses on Presbyterian Colleges and Universities.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 11/16/2009
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2004 - Presbyterian Colleges and Universities, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The February 2004 survey focuses on Presbyterian Colleges and Universities.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 11/16/2009
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2004 - Presbyterian Colleges and Universities, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The February 2004 survey focuses on Presbyterian Colleges and Universities.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 11/16/2009
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2004 - Disabilities Issues, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The May 2004 survey focuses on Disabilities Issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/14/2009
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2004 - Disabilities Issues, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The May 2004 survey focuses on Disabilities Issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/14/2009
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2004 - Disabilities Issues, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The May 2004 survey focuses on Disabilities Issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/14/2009
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, May 2004 - Disabilities Issues, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The May 2004 survey focuses on Disabilities Issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/14/2009
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2004 - Current Issues in Church and Society, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The November 2004 survey focuses on current issues in church and society.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 4/23/2010
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2004 - Current Issues in Church and Society, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The November 2004 survey focuses on current issues in church and society.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 4/23/2010
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2004 - Current Issues in Church and Society, Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The November 2004 survey focuses on current issues in church and society.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 4/23/2010
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, November 2004 - Current Issues in Church and Society, Members:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The November 2004 survey focuses on current issues in church and society.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 4/23/2010
  • Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1988:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, which measures religious fundamentalism among Christians- a construct similar to "orthodoxy" as conceived by some other researchers.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 12/8/2004
  • Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1987:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1987, Uploaded 12/8/2004
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2004 - Energy Issues, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The August 2004 survey focuses on Energy Issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 1/27/2010
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2004 - Energy Issues, Members and Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The August 2004 survey focuses on Energy Issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 1/27/2010
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1999:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science conducts a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 4/23/2007
  • Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Spring 1997:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 4/25/2013
  • Southern Focus Poll, Combined Sample, Spring 1999:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science conducts a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 4/23/2007
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1997:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS). [ARDA Note: This file was updated online on 10/21/21.]
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 11/11/1999
  • Southern Focus Poll, Combined Sample, Spring 1998:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South. To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners. All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1998, Uploaded 9/23/2005
  • Project Canada 1975:
    Begun in 1975, Project Canada has generated extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion. The project has taken representative samples of Canadians every five years, creating panel studies through which social change and stability can be monitored.
    Funded By: The United Church of Canada , the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation , the Solicitor General of Canada, the University of Lethbridge
    Collected: 1975, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Project Canada 1975-85 Panel Study:
    The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge . National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.
    Funded By: The 1975 survey was carried out for a cost of about $14,000 and had four major sources: the United Church of Canada ($2,000), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ($3,000), the Solicitor General of Canada ($5,000), and the University of Lethbridge ($4,000). In 1980, the panel portion of the survey was made possible by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($10,000) and the United Church of Canada ($2,000). The second phase of Project Canada 1980, which involved filling the core out into a full national sample, cost approximately $8,000 and was funded primarily by the University of Lethbridge. Project Canada 1985 was funded completely by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($45,000); Project Canada 1990 and Project Canada 1995 were both funded by The Lilly Endowment, Inc. (about $65,000 each).
    Collected: 1985, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Project Canada 1975-80 Panel Study:
    The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge . National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.
    Funded By: The 1975 survey was carried out for a cost of about $14,000 and had four major sources: the United Church of Canada ($2,000), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ($3,000), the Solicitor General of Canada ($5,000), and the University of Lethbridge ($4,000). In 1980, the panel portion of the survey was made possible by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($10,000) and the United Church of Canada ($2,000). The second phase of Project Canada 1980, which involved filling the core out into a full national sample, cost approximately $8,000 and was funded primarily by the University of Lethbridge. Project Canada 1985 was funded completely by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($45,000); Project Canada 1990 and Project Canada 1995 were both funded by The Lilly Endowment, Inc. (about $65,000 each).
    Collected: 1980, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Dimensions of Religiosity, 1988:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 11/7/2005
  • Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Spring 1996:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities; cultural issues, (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners. This file is an oversample for African Americans in the South.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 12/19/2008
  • Dimensions of Religiosity, 1987:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1987, Uploaded 11/7/2005
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1999:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accent and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (OIRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
    Collected: 1999, Uploaded 12/19/2008
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1996:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about economic conditions in their communities, cultural issues (such as Southern accents and the Confederate flag), race relations, religious involvement, and characteristics of Southerners and Northerners.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution .
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 8/2/2013
  • Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Father Component:
    The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and on behavior
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , with 13 participating national youth-serving organizations (African Methodist Episcopal Church, American Lutheran Church, Baptist General Conference, Churches of God-General Conference, Evangelical Covenant Church, 4-H Extension, Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, National Associations of Homes for Children, National Catholic Educational Association, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A), Southern Baptist Convention, United Church of Christ, United Methodist Church)
    Collected: 1984, Uploaded 10/19/1999
  • American Values Scale, 1988:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year, answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale, which is a modification of the Rokeach Values Survey . The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts in on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning "no importance at all" and 9 meaning "supreme importance to me."
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 7/1/2004
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2003 - Hunger Issues, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The February 2003 survey focuses on hunger issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 4/3/2009
  • Dimensions of Religiosity, 1985:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1985, Uploaded 11/7/2005
  • Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales -Respondents' Same-Sex Friends, 1986:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1986, Uploaded 12/8/2004
  • Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales -Paper and Pencil Version, 1986:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1986, Uploaded 12/8/2004
  • Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1986:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1986, Uploaded 12/8/2004
  • Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness, Self-Monitoring Scales, 1988:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Attitude, Self-Consciousness Scale and the Self-Monitoring Scale. The Fenigstein Self-Consciousness Scale is a measure of the consistent tendency of persons to direct attention inward or outward. The Snyder Self-Monitoring Scale purports to measure individual differences in concern about the appropriateness of social behavior and attention to or use of situational cues for monitoring self-presentation.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 12/19/2008
  • Dimensions of Religious Commitment, 1988:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Dimensions of Religious Commitment. Additional modules are available for free download through the Odum Institute's electronic archive.

    The Dimensions of Religious Commitment is a questionnaire designed to measure the four dimensions of religiosity (Glock and Stark, 1965)--Belief, Ritual, Experience, and Knowledge. Originally, Glock and Stark proposed five dimensions, which include "Consequences" as the fifth dimension. However, the authors did not generate measures for this last dimension. Their analysis of the first four dimensions showed that these dimensions are essentially uncorrelated, and that other attitudes and behavior can be predicted from positions on these dimensions. Furthermore, the authors had constructed indices of the four dimensions, mainly by summing points assigned to each item that was answered in a certain direction. Among these indices, the orthodoxy index was found to be the best predictor of all other aspects of religiosity, implying that belief is the most significant component of religiosity. The entire Glock and Stark questionnaire contained more than 500 items. The interested reader may consult the published analysis.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 8/27/2004
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2003 - Hunger Issues, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The February 2003 survey focuses on Hunger Issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 4/3/2009
  • Dimensions of Religiosity, 1986:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset measures five dimensions of religiosity, which consist of a 21-item scale, adapted from Faulkner and DeJong (1966).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1986, Uploaded 11/7/2005
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, February 2003 - Hunger Issues, Members and Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel, begun in 1973, is an ongoing panel study in which mailed questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation, and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. Panels are re-sampled every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (beliefs, church background, and levels of church involvement), and their social, economic, and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.) The February 2003 survey focuses on hunger issues.
    Funded By: General Assembly Council, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 4/3/2009
  • Project Canada 1975-90 Panel Study:
    The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge . National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.
    Funded By: The 1975 survey was carried out for a cost of about $14,000 and had four major sources: the United Church of Canada ($2,000), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ($3,000), the Solicitor General of Canada ($5,000), and the University of Lethbridge ($4,000). In 1980, the panel portion of the survey was made possible by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($10,000) and the United Church of Canada ($2,000). The second phase of Project Canada 1980, which involved filling the core out into a full national sample, cost approximately $8,000 and was funded primarily by the University of Lethbridge. Project Canada 1985 was funded completely by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($45,000); Project Canada 1990 and Project Canada 1995 were both funded by The Lilly Endowment, Inc. (about $65,000 each).
    Collected: 1990, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Project Canada 1985-95 Panel Study:
    The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge . National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.
    Funded By: The 1975 survey was carried out for a cost of about $14,000 and had four major sources: the United Church of Canada ($2,000), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ($3,000), the Solicitor General of Canada ($5,000), and the University of Lethbridge ($4,000). In 1980, the panel portion of the survey was made possible by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($10,000) and the United Church of Canada ($2,000). The second phase of Project Canada 1980, which involved filling the core out into a full national sample, cost approximately $8,000 and was funded primarily by the University of Lethbridge. Project Canada 1985 was funded completely by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($45,000); Project Canada 1990 and Project Canada 1995 were both funded by The Lilly Endowment, Inc. (about $65,000 each).
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Project Canada 1990-95 Panel Study:
    The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge . National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.
    Funded By: The 1975 survey was carried out for a cost of about $14,000 and had four major sources: the United Church of Canada ($2,000), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ($3,000), the Solicitor General of Canada ($5,000), and the University of Lethbridge ($4,000). In 1980, the panel portion of the survey was made possible by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($10,000) and the United Church of Canada ($2,000). The second phase of Project Canada 1980, which involved filling the core out into a full national sample, cost approximately $8,000 and was funded primarily by the University of Lethbridge. Project Canada 1985 was funded completely by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($45,000); Project Canada 1990 and Project Canada 1995 were both funded by The Lilly Endowment, Inc. (about $65,000 each).
    Collected: 1990, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Project Canada 1975-95 Panel Study:
    The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge . National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.
    Funded By: The 1975 survey was carried out for a cost of about $14,000 and had four major sources: the United Church of Canada ($2,000), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ($3,000), the Solicitor General of Canada ($5,000), and the University of Lethbridge ($4,000). In 1980, the panel portion of the survey was made possible by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($10,000) and the United Church of Canada ($2,000). The second phase of Project Canada 1980, which involved filling the core out into a full national sample, cost approximately $8,000 and was funded primarily by the University of Lethbridge. Project Canada 1985 was funded completely by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($45,000); Project Canada 1990 and Project Canada 1995 were both funded by The Lilly Endowment, Inc. (about $65,000 each).
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Project Canada 1980-95 Panel Study:
    The Project Canada Research Program has been carried out from the University of Lethbridge . National surveys of adults 18 and over have been conducted in 1975, 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995. Adult surveys in 2000 will complete the program. The goal has been to generate extensive information on life in Canada, with specific attention given to social issues, intergroup relations, and religion.
    Funded By: The 1975 survey was carried out for a cost of about $14,000 and had four major sources: the United Church of Canada ($2,000), the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ($3,000), the Solicitor General of Canada ($5,000), and the University of Lethbridge ($4,000). In 1980, the panel portion of the survey was made possible by grants from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($10,000) and the United Church of Canada ($2,000). The second phase of Project Canada 1980, which involved filling the core out into a full national sample, cost approximately $8,000 and was funded primarily by the University of Lethbridge. Project Canada 1985 was funded completely by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada ($45,000); Project Canada 1990 and Project Canada 1995 were both funded by The Lilly Endowment, Inc. (about $65,000 each).
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 2/2/2000
  • Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Mother Component:
    The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and behavior
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , with 13 participating national youth-serving organizations (African Methodist Episcopal Church, American Lutheran Church, Baptist General Conference, Churches of God-General Conference, Evangelical Covenant Church, 4-H Extension, Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, National Associations of Homes for Children, National Catholic Educational Association, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A), Southern Baptist Convention, United Church of Christ, United Methodist Church)
    Collected: 1984, Uploaded 10/19/1999
  • Religious Fundamentalism Scale, 1986:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religious Fundamentalism Scale, which measures religious fundamentalism among Christians- a construct similar to "orthodoxy" as conceived by some other researchers.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1986, Uploaded 12/8/2004
  • American Values Scale, 1985:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year, answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the American Values Scale, which is a modification of the Rokeach Values Survey . The survey asks respondents to rank various values and concepts on a scale of importance ranging from 1 to 9, with 1 meaning "no importance at all" and 9 meaning "supreme importance to me."
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1985, Uploaded 7/1/2004
  • Religious Life Inventory, 1986:
    The Computer Administered Panel Study (CAPS) collected demographic, personality, attitudinal, and other social psychological data from annual samples of University of North Carolina undergraduates from 1983 through 1988. Respondents spent 60 to 90 minutes per week for 20 weeks during the academic year answering questions via computer terminals. In their comparison of demographic and academic variables, researchers found few significant differences between respondents and the general undergraduate population. This dataset contains the Religion Life Inventory, which consists of three scales: External, Internal, and Interactional. Additional information about the survey can be found at the Odum Institute's electronic archive.
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science
    Collected: 1986, Uploaded 12/8/2004
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