Data Archive
  • General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2010 GSS. There are a total of 4,901 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2010 GSS featured special modules on aging, the Internet, shared capitalism, gender roles, intergroup relations, immigration, meeting spouse, knowledge about and attitudes toward science, religious identity, religious trends, genetics, veterans, crime and victimization, social networks and group membership, and sexual behavior (continuing the series started in 1988).

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. The 2006 GSS was the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2006 was selected for reinterview in 2008 and again in 2010 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2008 GSS consists of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2006. The 2010 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 2,044, the first reinterview wave of the 2,023 2008 panel cases with 1,581 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2006 panel with 1,276 completed cases. Altogether, the 2010 GSS had 4,901 cases (2,044 in the new 2010 panel, 1,581 in the 2008 panel, and 1,276 in the 2006 panel). The 2010 GSS is the first round to fully implement the new, rolling panel design. In 2012 and later GSSs, there will likewise be a fresh cross-section (wave one of a new panel), wave two panel cases from the immediately preceding GSS, and wave three panel cases from the next earlier GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/16/2011
  • Houston Area Survey, 1982-2010:
    For the past 28 years, these countywide, random-digit-dialed, computer-assisted telephone surveys have systematically measured the continuities and changes in demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes and beliefs among successive representative samples of Harris County residents. Using identical items across the years, with new questions added periodically, the annual Houston Area Survey (HAS) has tracked America's fourth largest city in the process of fundamental transformation.

    Houston recovered from deep recession in the 1980s to find itself squarely in the midst of a restructured economy and a demographic revolution. New economic, educational, and environmental challenges have redefined the "pro-growth" strategies required for urban prosperity in the twenty-first century. At the same time, major immigration flows have transformed Houston into one of the nation's most culturally diverse metropolitan areas, at the center of the transformations that are refashioning the social and political landscape of urban America. The overall purpose of this continuing project is to measure systematically the way area residents are responding to these remarkable changes, and to make the findings of this research widely available to the general public and to research scholars everywhere.

    Conducted annually during February and March, the interviews measure perspectives on the local and national economies, on poverty programs, interethnic relationships, and the new immigration; beliefs about discrimination and affirmative action, about education, crime, health care, taxation, and community service; assessments of downtown development, mobility and transit, land-use controls, and environmental concerns; attitudes toward abortion, homosexuality, and other aspects of "the social agenda." They record religious and political orientations, as well as a rich array of demographic and immigration characteristics, socioeconomic indicators, and family structures.
    Funded By: AT&T Foundation, Gallery Furniture, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Houston Chronicle, Houston Endowment Inc., Swalm Foundation, United Way of Greater Houston, Vinson & Elkins L.L.P., Amegy Bank, Bank of America, CenterPoint Energy, Fiesta Mart, H-E-B Company, Jain & Jain CPAs, JPMorganChase-Houston, KHOU-TV Channel 11, Memorial Hermann Hospital System, Palmetto Partners Ltd., Pinto America Growth Fund L.P., Sterling Bank, Wachovia Foundation, Wells Fargo, American Leadership Forum, Houston/Gulf Coast Chapter, BMC Software Inc., Center for, Houston's Future, Compass Bank, CRC Foundation, Deloitte & Touche, The Everett Family Fund, Fulbright & Jaworski L.L.P., Group 1 Automotive Inc., Hines Interests Limited Partnership, Houston Rockets, Indo-American Charity Foundation, Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston, Jacob and Terese Hershey Foundation, KTRK-TV Channel 13, Leadership Houston, Linbeck Group L.P., Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell L.L.P, Lovett Homes Inc., Management Leadership for, Tomorrow-Houston, Marek Brothers Systems Inc, Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw L.L.P., Merrill Lynch, MetroNational,, Reliant Energy, Shell Oil Company Foundation, Stanford and Joan Alexander Foundation, State Farm Insurance, Companies, Texas Children's Hospital, Waste Management Inc., Whitney National Bank, Wulfe and Co., F. J. Hank, Coleman, Jr., Janice M. Crawford, John Walsh, The Honorable Bob Lanier, Linda L. S. Moroney, Eugene Vaughan
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/3/2010
  • General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing):
    This file differs from the General Social Survey 2010 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2010 GSS. There are a total of 4,901 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2010 GSS featured special modules on aging, the Internet, shared capitalism, gender roles, intergroup relations, immigration, meeting spouse, knowledge about and attitudes toward science, religious identity, religious trends, genetics, veterans, crime and victimization, social networks and group membership, and sexual behavior (continuing the series started in 1988).

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. The 2006 GSS was the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2006 was selected for reinterview in 2008 and again in 2010 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2008 GSS consists of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2006. The 2010 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 2,044, the first reinterview wave of the 2,023 2008 panel cases with 1,581 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2006 panel with 1,276 completed cases. Altogether, the 2010 GSS had 4,901 cases (2,044 in the new 2010 panel, 1,581 in the 2008 panel, and 1,276 in the 2006 panel). The 2010 GSS is the first round to fully implement the new, rolling panel design. In 2012 and later GSSs, there will likewise be a fresh cross-section (wave one of a new panel), wave two panel cases from the immediately preceding GSS, and wave three panel cases from the next earlier GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 3/17/2014
  • Muslim American Survey, 2011:
    In 2007, the Pew Research Center conducted the first-ever nationwide survey of Muslim Americans . As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 approached, it seemed an appropriate time to survey Muslim Americans again and take stock of any important changes in the attitudes, opinions and experiences of this growing segment of U.S. society. The 2011 survey repeats many key questions from the 2007 poll. It also closely follows the methodology of the previous survey, including the use of random-digit-dialing to screen a large number of households (more than 41,000) to obtain a representative national sample of Muslims. As in 2007, interviews were conducted not only in English but also in Arabic, Urdu and Farsi, helping to ensure coverage of parts of the heavily immigrant Muslim American population that could be missed by an English-only survey.

    The Pew Research Center study was able to complete interviews with 1,033 Muslim American adults 18 years old and older from a probability sample consisting of three sampling frames. Interviews were conducted by telephone between April 14 and July 22, 2001 by the research firm Abt SRBI.
    Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 12/12/2016
  • Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS):
    CILS is a longitudinal study designed to study the adaptation process of the immigrant second generation, which is defined broadly as U.S.-born children with at least one foreign-born parent or child born abroad but brought at an early age to the United States. Immigrant families, children's own demographic characteristics, language use, self-identities, and academic attainment were key objectives. Questions about religion were asked only once, in Survey Wave 3 (variables V439 through V440).
    Funded By: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation , National Science Foundation , Spencer Foundation , Russell Sage Foundation
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 2/28/2020
  • Religion and Public Life Survey, 2010:
    The survey is a joint effort of the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. Conducted in July and August of 2010, it examined Americans' attitudes toward a wide range of topics related to religion and public life. Special topics included Barack Obama's religion, the religious right and left, the Tea Party movement, immigration, same-sex marriage, and the influence of religion in politics. The survey also contained a range of items on respondents' religious and political preferences and behavior.
    Funded By: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 4/25/2011
  • Global Attitudes Project, Spring 2010, 22 Nation Survey:
    The Global Attitudes Project, Spring 2010, 22 Nation Survey is a cross-national survey of attitudes on global issues. Topics include politics, social issues, globalization, life satisfaction, and religion. Respondents also were surveyed on their views of the role of the United States in the world and on their impressions of well-known leaders (Barack Obama, Angela Merkel, Vladimir Putin, etc.)

    This survey was conducted both before and after the passage of a controversial Arizona state immigration law. These data allow opportunities to examine the extent to which opinions in Mexico changed after this law was passed.
    Funded By: Pew Research Center - Global Attitudes and Trends
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 8/24/2015
  • American National Election Studies, 2004:
    From the ANES website : The study, in part, maintains and extends the core of the NES time-series by collecting data on Americans' basic political beliefs, allegiances, and behaviors. It contains special instrumentation on American's views on foreign policy, the war on terrorism, and the Iraq War and its consequences. It extends the experiment on the measurement of voter turnout begun in 2002, and carries expanded instrumentation on inflation, immigration, gender politics, and gay and lesbian politics. It also includes the Comparative Studies of Electoral System's Module 2, which focuses on representation and accountability. The data also contain several religion variables, including questions about prayer frequency, importance of religion, attendance at religious services, and belief in the Bible.
    Funded By: The National Science Foundation under grant SES-0118451, the University of Michigan Center for Political Studies , the University of Michigan Office of the Provost , the University of Michigan Political Science Department , and the University of Michigan Survey Research Center .
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 4/4/2006
  • Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey: Ohio Sample:
    The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents' views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants' influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress' ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn.
    Funded By: The Ford Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/14/2012
  • Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey: National Sample:
    The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents' views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants' influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress' ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn.
    Funded By: The Ford Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/14/2012
  • Jewish Values Survey 2012:
    The Jewish Values Survey examined the values, issues and political preferences of Jewish Americans. The survey included questions that explored views about religion and Jewish culture and traditions. The survey featured items to gauge views about foreign policy, Iran and Israel. The survey also covered voting behavior, economic inequality, immigration and social issues such as abortion and same-sex marriage.
    Funded By: The Nathan Cummings Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 6/8/2015
  • Pre-Election American Values Survey, 2012:
    The American Values Survey (AVS) is Public Religion Research Institute's annual multi-issue survey on religion, values and public policy. The survey is conducted each fall, and on election years includes both a pre-election and post-election survey.

    The 2012 Pre-Election Survey focused heavily on religious change in America and the 2012 presidential election. The survey included questions that measured current and childhood religious affiliation. Questions covered a variety of topics including attitudes toward political leaders, and views about abortion, same-sex marriage the contraception mandate and immigration.
    Funded By: The Ford Foundation The Nathan Cummings Foundation
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 2/13/2015
  • Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey: Arkansas Sample:
    The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents' views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants' influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress' ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn.
    Funded By: The Ford Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/14/2012
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2017:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey Nebraskans to create current, topical information about Nebraskans (ages 19 and older) and to monitor change in quality of life. The survey covers topics including environment, housing, health, Nebraska legislature, recreation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2017 NASIS gauges opinions about engineering, immigration, human rights, natural resources, youth and community, sex offenders, 4-H, youth and community.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research and other state agencies, private non-profit agencies and other university departments.
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 4/20/2020
  • Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Fall 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; characteristics of U.S. regions; word use; accents; race relations; immigration; cigarette smoking; NFL teams.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 4/25/2013
  • Religion, Values and Immigration Reform Survey, 2013:
    In February 2013, Public Religion Research Institute (PRRI) , in partnership with the Brookings Institution , conducted one of the largest surveys ever fielded on immigration policy, immigrants and religious and cultural changes in the U.S. The survey of nearly 4,500 American adults explores the many divisions - political, religious, ethnic, geographical and generational - within the nation over core values and their relationship to immigration. The new survey also tracks key questions from surveys conducted by PRRI in 2010-2011.
    Funded By: Ford Foundation , The Nathan Cummings Foundation , and Four Freedoms Fund/Public Interest Projects .
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 6/5/2017
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2011 - Immigrant Ministries and Immigration Issues, All:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2011 survey focuses on Immigrant Ministries and Immigrant Issues within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). This dataset contains data from all sampled constituency groups.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 3/16/2015
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2011 - Immigrant Ministries and Immigration Issues, Clergy:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2011 survey focuses on Immigrant Ministries and Immigrant Issues within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). This dataset contains data from sampled clergy.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 3/16/2015
  • Time-sharing Experiments for the Social Sciences, TESS2042 Creighton, Perceptions of Islam, Migration, and Citizenship in the United States:
    TESS conducts general population experiments on behalf of investigators throughout the social sciences. General population experiments allow investigators to assign representative subject populations to experimental conditions of their choosing. Faculty and graduate students from the social sciences and related fields (such as law and public health) propose experiments. A comprehensive, on-line submission and peer review process screens proposals for the importance of their contribution to science and society.

    This list experiment tests whether views toward immigrants depend on whether the immigrant group shares the same religion as the respondent. Since traditional survey methods may be more prone to social desirability bias, an experimental design is necessary. In this study, respondents are divided between a control group and, in this case, two treatment groups. The control group is just asked three questions unrelated to immigration. The first treatment group is asked the original three questions, but with an additional question pertaining to Muslim immigrants. The second treatment group is asked the original three questions, but with an additional question pertaining to Christian immigrants. In its most basic incarnation, the comparison of the mean of the responses to the control list with the mean of the responses to each of the treatments offers an estimate of the proportion opposed to the additional list item.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 2/13/2015
  • Presbyterian Panel Survey, August 2011 - Immigrant Ministries and Immigration Issues, Members and Elders:
    The Presbyterian Panel began in 1973 and is an ongoing panel study in which mailed and web-based questionnaires are used to survey representative samples of constituency groups of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) . These constituency groups include members, elders, pastors serving in a congregation and specialized clergy serving elsewhere. New samples are drawn every three years. The main goal of this study is to gather broad information about Presbyterians in terms of their faith (belief, church background and levels of church involvement) and their social, economic and demographic characteristics (age, sex, marital status, living arrangements, etc.). The August 2011 survey focuses on Immigrant Ministries and Immigrant Issues within the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). This dataset contains data from all sampled members and elders.
    Funded By: Congregational Ministries Division, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 3/16/2015
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2008:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2008 NASIS asks questions about driving behavior, cell phone usage, disaster response, health, immigration, and religion.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies, private non-profit agencies, and other university departments
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 11/27/2017
  • PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, November 2013:
    The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward immigration. Questions explored attitudes toward immigration policy, immigration reform and citizenship requirements.
    Funded By: Public Religion Research Institute
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 11/14/2016
  • PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, August 2013:
    The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward immigration. Questions explored Americans' opinions regarding immigration reform policies and path to citizenship programs.
    Funded By: Public Religion Research Institute
    Collected: 2013, Uploaded 5/23/2016
  • PRRI Religion & Politics Tracking Poll, June 2012:
    The Religion & Politics Tracking Poll was conducted by Public Religion Research Institute to examine attitudes on breaking news and emerging issues at the intersection of religion and politics. This survey examined public attitudes toward topics discussed in the country today. Questions explored attitudes toward same-sex marriage, immigration policies, health care laws, and whether certain policies should be decided at the national or state level.
    Funded By: Public Religion Research Institute
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 5/23/2016
  • Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Fall 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; characteristics of U.S. regions; word use; accents; race relations; immigration; cigarette smoking; NFL teams.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 4/25/2013
  • Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Fall 1995:
    Southerners tend to slip through the cracks between state surveys, which are unreliable for generalizing to the region, on the one hand, and national sample surveys, which usually contain too few Southerners to allow detailed examination, on the other. Moreover, few surveys routinely include questions specifically about the South.

    To remedy this situation, the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science and the Center for the Study of the American South sponsor a Southern regional survey, called the Southern Focus Poll. Respondents in both the South and Non-South are asked questions about: political preference; religion; characteristics of U.S. regions; word use; accents; race relations; immigration; cigarette smoking; NFL teams.

    All of the data sets from the Southern Focus Polls archived here are generously made available by the Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (IRSS).
    Funded By: The Odum Institute for Research in Social Science of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the Atlanta Journal-Constitution
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 8/2/2013
[Viewing Matches 1-26]  (of 26 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
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