Data Archive
  • Baylor Religion Survey, Wave V (2017):
    Wave V of the Baylor Religion Survey (2017), also known as "The Values and Beliefs of the American Public - A National Study," was administered by Gallup and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. It covers topics of the geography of religion; religious behaviors and attitudes; morality and politics; mental health and religion; intersection of technology and religion; race and ethnicity; the religious, political and ideological values of Trump voters; and basic demographics.
    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 4/20/2020
  • General Social Survey, 2006:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS is designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 2006 GSS features special modules on mental health and social networks. Items on religion cover denominational affiliation, church attendance, religious upbringing, personal beliefs, and religious experiences.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 9/14/2007
  • General Social Survey, 2002:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 2002 GSS include questions on religious self-identification, denominational affiliation, church attendance, personal beliefs, and religious upbringing.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 11/17/2003
  • General Social Survey, 2000:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 2000 GSS include a module on religion (with items measuring religious self-identification, religious schooling, congregational affiliation, church attendance, and local church performance).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 4/12/2002
  • General Social Survey, 1996:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about the Bible, attitudes toward organized religion and its opponents, and more. In addition, it contains a special module examining respondents' images of God. The survey also contains topical modules on national identity, the role of government, and mental health.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 11/10/2008
  • Baylor Religion Survey, Wave V (2017) - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2017 Baylor Religion Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes and "don't know" responses have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

    Wave V of the Baylor Religion Survey (2017), also known as "The Values and Beliefs of the American Public - A National Study," was administered by Gallup and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. It covers topics of the geography of religion; religious behaviors and attitudes; morality and politics; mental health and religion; intersection of technology and religion; race and ethnicity; the religious, political and ideological values of Trump voters; and basic demographics.


    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/26/2020
  • General Social Survey, 1998:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 1998 GSS include special modules on religion (with items measuring giving, volunteering, religious self-identification, religious schooling, congregational affiliation, and spiritualism), culture, job experiences, inter-racial friendships, national security, medical care, medical ethics, and the social security system.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 1998, Uploaded 12/20/2000
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Family Health History (Parent), Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    The file contains data from Wave I Parent's family health history leave-behind forms. The name of the file is “fhhp2” on official Add Health data documentation .
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health.
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • Culturally Adapted Spiritually Oriented Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Child Survivors of Restavek:
    Restavek is a form of modern-day slavery that is estimated to affect 300,000 (i.e., approximately 1 in 10) children in Haiti. It typically involves a child from a poor rural family being sent to work as an indentured domestic servant for an affluent urban family. Restavek children experience a high rate of trauma, as well as other mental health concerns.The present study explored the effectiveness of a culturally adapted form of Spiritually Oriented Trauma-Focused Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy (SO-TF-CBT), a treatment model for assessing and treating religious and spiritual issues within the standard TF-CBT protocol (an evidence-based treatment for childhood trauma). This study involved 20 control participants and 38 treatment participants assigned to a 12-session protocol. The primary research question of the present study is whether a culturally adapted SO-TFCBT intervention, relative to a control, would lead to a reduction in posttraumatic stress symptoms among child survivors of Restavek in Haiti. Because SO-TF-CBT also targets potential religious and spiritual issues related to trauma, a secondary research question examined the effects of this intervention on participants' tendencies to experience spiritual struggles. In the interests of better addressing the mental health treatment gap among this population in Haiti, our study also investigated, as a secondary goal, whether this treatment could be effectively delivered by people with less formal mental health training. Specifically, we examined three distinct delivery methods: (a) community- based lay counselors, (b) NGO staff volunteers, and (c) undergraduate students from a local university.
    Funded By: This survey is part of a larger grant from the John Templeton Foundation entitled "Earth as a School: Finding Meaning, Relating to God, and Experiencing Growth After a Natural Disaster" (#44040) .
    Collected: 2015, Uploaded 10/29/2018
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2004:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2004 NASIS asks questions about outdoor and recreational activities, environmental conservation issues, household composition, job situation, civic attitudes and behavior, mental health and attitudes toward criminal justice.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/3/2018
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1997:
    The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 6, 1997, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1997, Uploaded 8/19/2016
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1994:
    "The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 5, 1994, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1994, Uploaded 2/23/2018
  • Marital Instability Over the Life Course [United States]: A Five-Wave Panel Study, 1980, 1983, 1988, 1992-1994, 1997:
    To examine the causes of marital instability throughout the life course, five waves of data were collected between 1980 and 1997 from married individuals who were between the ages of 18 and 55 in 1980. Information collected in 1980 (Wave I) focused on the effects of wives' participation in the labor force on marriage and marital instability. Measures predicting marital instability and divorce and assessing marital quality were developed. Variables include information on earnings, commitment to work, hours worked, and occupational status. The focus of Wave II, conducted in 1983, was to link changes in factors such as economic resources, wife's employment, presence of children, marital satisfaction, life goals, and health to actions intended to dissolve a marriage, such as divorce and permanent separation. Information on adjustment to marital dissolution, relationship with in-laws, size of home, parents' employment, use of free time, club membership, child-care arrangements, and responsibility for chores was gathered. Wave III, collected in 1988, further examined the impact of changes in employment, economics, and health on marital relationships. Questions were asked about divorce and remarriage, investment of energy and resource use in the care of aging parents and dependent offspring, asset value, awareness of aging, mental health issues, and history of disease. In 1992, a fourth wave of data was collected to look at changes in employment, economics, and health. Questions were asked about retirement issues, family structure, and the impact of caring for aging parents while at the same time caring for dependent offspring. Data were also collected in 1992 and 1994 from adult offspring who were living in the household in 1980 and had reached age 19 by 1992, thus providing parallel measures with their parents regarding the quality of parent-child relationships, attitudes, and support along with exploring the impact of childhood experiences on the transition to adult life. In 1997, the fifth wave was collected and interviews were conducted with a second sample of adult offspring (N=202) along with second interviews of offspring selected in 1992 (N=606). Wave 5 also examines the relationship between marital quality and stability and how it relates to changes in marital quality later in life. Among the variables included in all five waves are age, sex, educational attainment, marital status and history, attitude toward divorce, number of children, religious affiliation, and income level.
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1980, Uploaded 5/21/2010
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Family Health History (Spouse/Parent), Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    The file contains family health history leave-behind data from the Spouse/Partner of the Wave I Parent. The name of the file is “fhhsp2” on official Add Health data documentation .
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health.
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Add Health Sample Member Weights, Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    This file contains the weights for analysis of Add Health child-level data. The name of the file is "p2ahwgt" on official Add Health data documentation .
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health.
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Wave I Parent Weights, Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    This file contains the weights for analysis of Add Health child-level data. The name of the file is "p2wgt" on official Add Health data documentation .
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Parent Main Interview, Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    This file is the main interview data collected 2015-2017 from Add Health Wave I Parent. The name of the file is "parent2" on official Add Health data documentation . It is organized on the ID of the Add Health child, so parent records are duplicated when an interviewed Wave I Parent has multiple Add Health children. Users who want to analyze Main interview data at the parent level can do so by eliminating duplicates of the Parent ID.
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health.
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Household and Family Roster, Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    This file is the Household and Family Roster data collected 2015-2017 from Add Health Wave I Parent. This file is also organized on the ID of the Add Health child, so rosters are duplicated when an interviewed Wave I Parent has multiple Add Health children. Users who want to analyze roster data on the parent level (one roster per parent) can eliminate duplicate rosters by using a variable provided for that purpose (see details of file contents). The name of the file is "prprnt2" on official Add Health data documentation .
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Spouse/Partner Roster, Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    This file is the small subset of family relationship data collected 2015-2017 from the Spouse or Partner of the Add Health Wave I Parent. The name of the file is "rsp2" on official Add Health data documentation .
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Spouse/Partner, Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    This file is the main interview data collected from the Spouse or Partner of the Add Health Wave I Parent. The name of the file is "sp2" on official Add Health data documentation .
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • Hurricane Katrina - Spiritual, Psychological and Mental Health Response:
    Collected at the University of Southern Mississippi within four months following Hurricane Katrina, this data set contains basic demographic data and three psychological scales - Conservation of Resources (actual loss and threat of loss), Posttraumatic Growth Inventory and Brief RCOPE. These data were collected under the auspices of the Humanitarian Disaster Institute at Wheaton College .
    Funded By: This survey is part of a larger grant from the John Templeton Foundation entitled "Earth as a School: Finding Meaning, Relating to God, and Experiencing Growth After a Natural Disaster" (#44040) .
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 8/29/2018
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 2005:
    The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 8, 2005, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 10/4/2019
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1971:
    The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their sixties), middle-aged parents (then in their early forties), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file only contains the first wave in 1971.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1971, Uploaded 3/16/2015
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 2000:
    The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service. This file contains Wave 7, 2000, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 9/21/2015
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1988:
    "The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 3, 1988, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1988, Uploaded 4/9/2018
  • Survey of Texas Adults, 2004:
    This data set is aimed at learning more about the lives of Texas adults. Specifically, the data set contains information on seven major aspects of Texans' lives: civic engagement and attitudes; volunteering; organizational memberships and giving behaviors; personality; physical and mental health; health behaviors; religious activities and beliefs. The dataset also includes information about respondents' demographic characteristics.
    Funded By: RGK Center for Philanthropy and Community Service The College of Liberal Arts , The University of Texas at Austin
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 9/6/2013
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2012:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year, and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2011 NASIS asks questions about the Nebraska Department of Roads, trees and forests, water planning, wind energy, climate change, community trust, impressions about UNL, government policies, female sex offenders, personal finances, and mental health.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and private research organizations
    Collected: 2012, Uploaded 2/23/2018
  • Longitudinal Study of Generations, 1985:
    "The Longitudinal Study of Generations (LSOG), initiated in 1971, began as a survey of intergenerational relations among 300 three-generation California families with grandparents (then in their 60s), middle-aged parents (then in their early 40s), and grandchildren (then aged 15 to 26). The study broadened in 1991 and now includes a fourth generation, the great-grandchildren of these same families. The LSOG, with a fully elaborated generation-sequential design, allows comparisons of sets of aging parents and children at the same stage of life but during different historical periods. These comparisons make possible the investigation of the effects of social change on inter-generational solidarity or conflict across 35 years and four generations, as well as the effects of social change on the ability of families to buffer stressful life transitions (e.g., aging, divorce and remarriage, higher female labor force participation, changes in work and the economy, and possible weakening of family norms of obligation), and the effects of social change on the transmission of values, resources, and behaviors across generations. The study also examines how intergenerational relationships influence individuals' well-being as they transition across the life course from early, to middle, to late adulthood. The LSOG contains information on family structure, household composition, affectual solidarity and conflict, values, attitudes, behaviors, role importance, marital relationships, health and fitness, mental health and well-being, caregiving, leisure activities, and life events and concerns. Demographic variables include age, sex, income, employment status, marital status, socioeconomic history, education, religion, ethnicity, and military service." [Longitudinal Study of Generations Description] This file contains Wave 2, 1985, of the Longitudinal Study of Generations.

    Presence of common scales: Affectual Solidarity Reliability, Consensual Solidarity (Socialization), Associational Solidarity, Functional Solidarity, Intergenerational Social Support, Normative Solidarity, Familism, Structural Solidarity, Intergenerational Feelings of Conflict, Management of Conflict Tactics, Rosenberg Self-Esteem, Depression (CES-D), Locus of Control, Bradburn Affect Balance, Eysenck Extraversion/Neuroticism, Anxiety (Hopkins Symptom Checklist), Activities of Daily Living (IADL/ADL), Religious Ideology, Political Conservatism, Gender Role Ideology, Individualism/Collectivism, Materialism/Humanism, Work Satisfaction, Gilford-Bengtson Marital Satisfaction.
    Funded By: United States Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute on Aging
    Collected: 1985, Uploaded 9/7/2018
[Viewing Matches 1-28]  (of 28 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
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