Timeline
  • Bureau of Immigration: In 1920, the National Catholic Welfare Council gave aid and guidance to new Catholic immigrants through its Bureau of Immigration.
  • Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965: The Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 (i.e., Hart-Celler Act) permitted more Muslim, Buddhist, and Hindu immigrants into the United States, changing the U.S. religious landscape.
  • First Daoist/Traditional Chinese Temples in the U.S. : Daoism (i.e., Taoism), one of China’s recognized religions, arrived in San Francisco in the 19th century as Chinese immigrants sought work in California’s gold rush.
  • Philadelphia Baptist Association: In 1707, Welsh Baptist immigrants in Philadelphia formed the first permanent Baptist denomination in America.
  • Settlement House Movement: In the late 19th century, many Catholic and Protestant organizations established settlement houses to aid urban immigrants and poor American-born citizens.
  • Church of the United Brethren in Christ: In 1800, the Church of the United Brethren in Christ formed as a result of evangelizing German immigrants. It is the first uniquely American denomination.
  • Thind, Bhagat Singh : Bhagat Singh Thind (1892-1967), a Sant Mat devotee and Indian immigrant, was the subject of an important legal test denying U.S. citizenship to Asian Indians.
  • Major Upsurge in Hindu Temples : The 1970s, and early 1980s, saw an explosion of Hindu temples in America, courtesy of a new law allowing for more immigrants from India.
  • First Shinto Shrine in the U.S. : On November 3, 1898, Japanese immigrants built the first Shinto shrine in the United States in Hilo, Hawaii.
  • Mother Mosque of America: The "Mother Mosque of America," established by immigrants in 1934 in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, is the oldest purpose-built mosque still in use.
  • Dzemijetul Hajrije: Dzemijetal Hajrije, America's oldest existing Muslim organization, was formed in 1906 by Bosnian immigrants who came to Chicago to help dig subway tunnels.
  • First Purpose-Built Mosque: In 1929, Syrian-Lebanese immigrants constructed the first purpose-built mosque in America in Ross, N.D., to serve their small community of Muslims.
  • First Buddhist Temples Built: In the 1850s-1880s, Chinese and Japanese immigrants brought Buddhism to America as they searched for work in Hawaii's plantations and California's gold rush.
  • Plenary Councils of Baltimore: The Plenary Councils of Baltimore were a series of meetings of the American Catholic bishops held in 1852, 1866, and 1884.
  • Gibbons, James : James Gibbons (1834-1921) was an American cardinal archbishop who guided the Catholic Church through historic changes and mediated relations between American Catholics and the Vatican.
  • Sanctuary Movement: The Sanctuary Movement of the 1980s helped to provide sanctuaries and safe havens for Central American refugees.
  • Formation of the Associate Reformed Presbytery, or "Seceders": The Associate Reformed Presbytery, formed in Philadelphia in 1782, represented Scottish immigrants from the "seceder" tradition in the Church of Scotland.
  • Hughes, John : John Hughes (1797-1864) was a New York archbishop, who oversaw growth in the American Catholic Church due to Irish immigration and advocated Catholic parochial education.
  • Bradstreet, Anne : Anne Bradstreet (1612-1672) was one of early America's first noteworthy poets.
  • Cabrini, Frances Xavier: Frances Xavier Cabrini (1850-1917) was the first American citizen to be named a saint by the Catholic Church.
  • Buddhist Churches of America: The Buddhist Churches of America, formed in 1944 and headquartered in San Francisco, represents mainstream Japanese American Buddhism.
  • Vietnamese Buddhists Come to United States : Vietnamese Buddhism spread across America as thousands of refugees arrived after the Vietnam War ended in 1975.
  • First Presbytery Formed in Philadelphia: The formation of a presbytery in Philadelphia in 1706 brought official Presbyterianism to the colonies.
  • Knights of Columbus: The Knights of Columbus is a fraternal organization for Catholic men that formed in Connecticut in 1882.
  • Ursuline Convent Riots: In 1834, an anti-Catholic mob burned down a convent and school run by Ursuline nuns in Charlestown, Mass.
  • Spalding, Martin John: Martin John Spalding, born in 1810, was a leading bishop of the Catholic Church in the mid-19th century. He died in 1872.
  • Hanover Presbytery Organized in Virginia: The 1755 founding of Hanover Presbytery in Virginia highlighted the rapid expansion of evangelicalism in the South during the First Great Awakening.
  • First Methodist Missionary Societies Organized : In 1819, American Methodists organized their first missionary societies in New York and Philadelphia.
  • Neumann, John Nepomucene: John Neumann (1811-1860) served as bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Philadelphia from 1852 to 1860 and was the first American bishop to be canonized.
  • Maurin, Peter : Peter Maurin’s (1877-1949) vision of a transformed society led to the co-founding of the Catholic Worker Movement with Dorothy Day.
  • Tennent, Gilbert : Gilbert Tennent (1703-1764) was an Irish-born "New Side" Presbyterian minister and revivalist. His criticism of more conservative Presbyterians led to a schism in 1741.
  • Memorial Movement: With early origins in the 1780s, the memorial movement highlights how Americans commonly commemorate the dead in visual and material forms.
  • Hecker, Isaac : Isaac Hecker (1819-1888) was an intellectual forefather to the Catholic Americanist movement. He was dedicated to defending the Catholic Church and converting Americans to Catholicism.
  • Vietnam War: America’s two-decade involvement in the Vietnam War (1955-1975) was costly and divisive. It claimed more than 58,000 U.S. lives and cost 140 billion dollars.
[Viewing Matches 1-34]  (of 34 total matches in Timelines)
Measurements
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Measurement Concepts)
ARDA Dictionary
  • Migration and Religion:The study of religion and immigration generally has three classes of study: 1) the impact of religion on migration; 2) the impact of migration on religion; and 3) the effect of religion on the life chances and adaptation of migrants. In understanding the impact of religion on migration, the amount of religious capital an individual accrues may either prevent migration (if religious capital in the current country is high) or act as a push factor (if the destination provides opportunity for a stronger religious community). In understanding the impact of migration on religion, the migration of Catholic immigrants in the 19th and early 20th century allowed Catholicism to go from a small firm to one with a quarter of consumers (Finke and Stark 1992). Finally, religion may influence the life chances of immigrants, as religious organizations may help immigrants assimilate to the United States (Sherkat 2011).
  • Hughes, John (1797-1864):John Hughes was an important New York archbishop who oversaw growth in the American Catholic Church due to Irish immigration and advocated Catholic parochial education. For more information on John Hughes, click here .
  • Confucianism:A Chinese religion founded by Confucius (551-479 BCE), whose goal was to foster social harmony through a combination of self-cultivation and social rites. Chinese Immigrants brought Confucianism to the United States in the 19th century (Prothero 2008: 211-212).
  • Gibbons, James (1834-1921):James Gibbons was an important American cardinal archbishop who guided the Catholic Church through the influx of Irish immigrants in the 19th century. Moreover, he mediated relations between American Catholics and the Vatican. Pope Leo XIII was suspicious of American cultural influence on American clerics, but Gibbons defended his American officials. For more information on James Gibbons, click here .
  • Buddhism:A world religion founded by Siddhartha Gautama, the Buddha in the sixth or fifth century BCE in India. Teaching reincarnation and freedom from worldly attachments, Buddhism has three major branches: Theravada, Mahayana and Vajrayana. According to Buddhism, the origin of suffering comes from ignorance, and that one must follow the Eightfold Path to reach nirvana. Buddhism first came to America through Chinese immigration (Prothero 2008: 205-206).
[Viewing Matches 1-5]  (of 5 total matches in the ARDA Dictionary)
Religious Membership County Reports
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in RCMS County Reports)
Teaching Tools
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Taking America Back for God: Christian nationalism in the Untied States.
    Whitehead, Andrew L., and Samuel L. Perry (2020)
    Oxford: Oxford University Press.

    Documents how Christian nationalism shapes what Americans think about who they are as a people, what their future should look like, & how they should get there. Americans' stance toward Christian nationalism provides powerful insight into what they think about immigration, Islam, gun control, police shootings, atheists, gender roles, & many other political issues-very much including who they want in the White House.

    Associated Search Terms: Identity, national; Politics, U.S.A.; United States
  • Bridging sociology of religion to transition to adulthood: The emerging role of religion in young adults’ lives
    Jung, Gowoon, and Hyunjoon Park (2020)
    Social Compass 67:3: 428-443.

    The previous literature’s exclusive focus on religiosity at the expense of institutional & social aspects of religion & under-appreciation of heterogeneous roles of religion for different racial/ethnic groups have contributed to the prevalent view that minimizes the relevance of religion for the transition to adulthood. We know little about how religion interacts with social class, gender, race/ethnicity, & immigrant status in shaping timing, duration, & connections of various transition markers.

    Associated Search Terms: Young adults
  • Evangelicals and Immigration: Fault Lines among the Faithful.
    Melkonian-Hoover, Ruth M., and Lyman A. Kellstedt (2019)
    New York: Palgrave.

    Focuses on fault lines within the Evangelical community: white Evangelicals opposing immigration, non-white Evangelicals not doing so; Evangelical elites not opposing immigration, non-elites opposing; differences within Evangelical elites.

    Associated Search Terms: Evangelical, U.S.A.; Migration; Politics, U.S.A.; Prejudice, anti-immigrant
  • Religious memory of Facebook in times of refugee crisis.
    Guzek, Damian (2019)
    Social Compass 66:1: 75-93.

    Analyzes religious discourse in Polish Facebook concerned with refugees. Religious memory in fragmentary form is used superficially for reinforcing Polish "We" feeling, while permitting contrary privatized feelings.

    Associated Search Terms: Prejudice, anti-immigrant; Prejudice, anti-Islamic; Poland; Discourse; Internet; Memory
  • The Legitimation Crisis of the Orthodox Church in the United States: From Assimilation to Incorporation.
    Crisan, Cezara O. (2019)
    Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield.

    Analyzes the assimilation & incorporation of contemporary Eastern European Christian immigrants into American society by using the theory of legitimation crisis.

    Associated Search Terms: Assimilation; Legitimation; Migrant; Orthodox, eastern, U.S.A.
  • Empathy Beyond US Borders: The Challenges of Transnational ivic Engagement.
    Adler, Gary J., Jr. (2019)
    New York: Cambridge University Press.

    Follows alongside immersion travelers as they meet undocumented immigrants, walk desert trails, & witness deportations. His close observations combine with interviews & surveys to evaluate the potential of this civic action, while developing theory about culture, empathy, & progressive religion in transnational civic life.

    Associated Search Terms: Civic engagement; Empathy; Travel
  • Birth Control Battles. How Race and Class Divided American Religion.
    Wilde, Melissa J. (2019)
    Berkeley: University of California Press.

    The push to liberalize positions on contraception was tied to complex views of race, immigration, & manifest destiny among America’s major religions. Taking us from the Depression era, when support for the eugenics movement saw birth control as an act of duty for less desirable groups, to the 1960s, by which time most groups had forgotten the reasons behind their stances on contraception, the author explains how reproductive politics divided American religion.

    Associated Search Terms: Birth control; Eugenics; United States
  • Religious governance in the Spanish city: Hands-on versus hands-off approaches to accommodating religious diversity in Barcelona and Madrid.
    Astor, Avi, Mar Griera, and Mónica Cornejo (2019)
    Religion, State & Society 47:4/5: 390–404.

    Examines divergent trajectories of religious governance in Madrid & Barcelona, 2 cities that have pursued distinct approaches to accommodating religious diversity despite being located in the same national context. Madrid has dealt with religious diversity under the broader rubric of immigration & culture, and has been passive & ‘hands-off’ in its approach; Barcelona has demarcated religion from other cultural issues & developed a more proactive and ‘hands-on’ approach to governing religious diversity.

    Associated Search Terms: Regulation; Spain; State; Urban
  • Bad Samaritans: Religion and anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim sentiment in the United States.
    Sherkat, Darren E., and Derek Lehman (2018)
    Social Science Quarterly 99: 1791-1804.

    x

    Associated Search Terms: Prejudice, anti-immigrant; Prejudice, anti-Islamic
  • The immigrant effect: Short-term mission travel as transnational civic remittance.
    Adler, Gary J., Jr., and Andrea L. Ruiz (2018)
    Sociology of Religion 79:3: 323-355.

    Analyzes 2012 National Congregations Study (U.S.A.) data; identifies congregation characteristics associated with short-term mission travel, including presence of immigrant members.

    Associated Search Terms: Congregation; Migrant; Missions; Transnational
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 449 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2010 GSS. There are a total of 4,901 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2010 GSS featured special modules on aging, the Internet, shared capitalism, gender roles, intergroup relations, immigration, meeting spouse, knowledge about and attitudes toward science, religious identity, religious trends, genetics, veterans, crime and victimization, social networks and group membership, and sexual behavior (continuing the series started in 1988).

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. The 2006 GSS was the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2006 was selected for reinterview in 2008 and again in 2010 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2008 GSS consists of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2006. The 2010 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 2,044, the first reinterview wave of the 2,023 2008 panel cases with 1,581 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2006 panel with 1,276 completed cases. Altogether, the 2010 GSS had 4,901 cases (2,044 in the new 2010 panel, 1,581 in the 2008 panel, and 1,276 in the 2006 panel). The 2010 GSS is the first round to fully implement the new, rolling panel design. In 2012 and later GSSs, there will likewise be a fresh cross-section (wave one of a new panel), wave two panel cases from the immediately preceding GSS, and wave three panel cases from the next earlier GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/16/2011
  • Houston Area Survey, 1982-2010:
    For the past 28 years, these countywide, random-digit-dialed, computer-assisted telephone surveys have systematically measured the continuities and changes in demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes and beliefs among successive representative samples of Harris County residents. Using identical items across the years, with new questions added periodically, the annual Houston Area Survey (HAS) has tracked America's fourth largest city in the process of fundamental transformation.

    Houston recovered from deep recession in the 1980s to find itself squarely in the midst of a restructured economy and a demographic revolution. New economic, educational, and environmental challenges have redefined the "pro-growth" strategies required for urban prosperity in the twenty-first century. At the same time, major immigration flows have transformed Houston into one of the nation's most culturally diverse metropolitan areas, at the center of the transformations that are refashioning the social and political landscape of urban America. The overall purpose of this continuing project is to measure systematically the way area residents are responding to these remarkable changes, and to make the findings of this research widely available to the general public and to research scholars everywhere.

    Conducted annually during February and March, the interviews measure perspectives on the local and national economies, on poverty programs, interethnic relationships, and the new immigration; beliefs about discrimination and affirmative action, about education, crime, health care, taxation, and community service; assessments of downtown development, mobility and transit, land-use controls, and environmental concerns; attitudes toward abortion, homosexuality, and other aspects of "the social agenda." They record religious and political orientations, as well as a rich array of demographic and immigration characteristics, socioeconomic indicators, and family structures.
    Funded By: AT&T Foundation, Gallery Furniture, Greater Houston Community Foundation, Houston Chronicle, Houston Endowment Inc., Swalm Foundation, United Way of Greater Houston, Vinson & Elkins L.L.P., Amegy Bank, Bank of America, CenterPoint Energy, Fiesta Mart, H-E-B Company, Jain & Jain CPAs, JPMorganChase-Houston, KHOU-TV Channel 11, Memorial Hermann Hospital System, Palmetto Partners Ltd., Pinto America Growth Fund L.P., Sterling Bank, Wachovia Foundation, Wells Fargo, American Leadership Forum, Houston/Gulf Coast Chapter, BMC Software Inc., Center for, Houston's Future, Compass Bank, CRC Foundation, Deloitte & Touche, The Everett Family Fund, Fulbright & Jaworski L.L.P., Group 1 Automotive Inc., Hines Interests Limited Partnership, Houston Rockets, Indo-American Charity Foundation, Interfaith Ministries for Greater Houston, Jacob and Terese Hershey Foundation, KTRK-TV Channel 13, Leadership Houston, Linbeck Group L.P., Locke Lord Bissell & Liddell L.L.P, Lovett Homes Inc., Management Leadership for, Tomorrow-Houston, Marek Brothers Systems Inc, Mayer, Brown, Rowe & Maw L.L.P., Merrill Lynch, MetroNational,, Reliant Energy, Shell Oil Company Foundation, Stanford and Joan Alexander Foundation, State Farm Insurance, Companies, Texas Children's Hospital, Waste Management Inc., Whitney National Bank, Wulfe and Co., F. J. Hank, Coleman, Jr., Janice M. Crawford, John Walsh, The Honorable Bob Lanier, Linda L. S. Moroney, Eugene Vaughan
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/3/2010
  • General Social Survey 2010 Cross-Section and Panel Combined, (Inapplicable Responses Coded as Missing):
    This file differs from the General Social Survey 2010 in that all inapplicable values are set to system missing. The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972, except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed to be part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. This data file has all cases and variables asked on the 2010 GSS. There are a total of 4,901 cases in the data set but their initial sampling years vary because the GSS now contains panel cases. Sampling years can be identified with the variable SAMPTYPE.

    The 2010 GSS featured special modules on aging, the Internet, shared capitalism, gender roles, intergroup relations, immigration, meeting spouse, knowledge about and attitudes toward science, religious identity, religious trends, genetics, veterans, crime and victimization, social networks and group membership, and sexual behavior (continuing the series started in 1988).

    The GSS has switched from a repeating, cross-section design to a combined repeating cross-section and panel-component design. The 2006 GSS was the base year for the first panel. A sub-sample of 2,000 GSS cases from 2006 was selected for reinterview in 2008 and again in 2010 as part of the GSSs in those years. The 2008 GSS consists of a new cross-section plus the reinterviews from 2006. The 2010 GSS consists of a new cross-section of 2,044, the first reinterview wave of the 2,023 2008 panel cases with 1,581 completed cases, and the second and final reinterview of the 2006 panel with 1,276 completed cases. Altogether, the 2010 GSS had 4,901 cases (2,044 in the new 2010 panel, 1,581 in the 2008 panel, and 1,276 in the 2006 panel). The 2010 GSS is the first round to fully implement the new, rolling panel design. In 2012 and later GSSs, there will likewise be a fresh cross-section (wave one of a new panel), wave two panel cases from the immediately preceding GSS, and wave three panel cases from the next earlier GSS.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 3/17/2014
  • Muslim American Survey, 2011:
    In 2007, the Pew Research Center conducted the first-ever nationwide survey of Muslim Americans . As the 10th anniversary of 9/11 approached, it seemed an appropriate time to survey Muslim Americans again and take stock of any important changes in the attitudes, opinions and experiences of this growing segment of U.S. society. The 2011 survey repeats many key questions from the 2007 poll. It also closely follows the methodology of the previous survey, including the use of random-digit-dialing to screen a large number of households (more than 41,000) to obtain a representative national sample of Muslims. As in 2007, interviews were conducted not only in English but also in Arabic, Urdu and Farsi, helping to ensure coverage of parts of the heavily immigrant Muslim American population that could be missed by an English-only survey.

    The Pew Research Center study was able to complete interviews with 1,033 Muslim American adults 18 years old and older from a probability sample consisting of three sampling frames. Interviews were conducted by telephone between April 14 and July 22, 2001 by the research firm Abt SRBI.
    Funded By: The Pew Charitable Trusts
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 12/12/2016
  • Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS):
    CILS is a longitudinal study designed to study the adaptation process of the immigrant second generation, which is defined broadly as U.S.-born children with at least one foreign-born parent or child born abroad but brought at an early age to the United States. Immigrant families, children's own demographic characteristics, language use, self-identities, and academic attainment were key objectives. Questions about religion were asked only once, in Survey Wave 3 (variables V439 through V440).
    Funded By: Andrew W. Mellon Foundation , National Science Foundation , Spencer Foundation , Russell Sage Foundation
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 2/28/2020
  • Religion and Public Life Survey, 2010:
    The survey is a joint effort of the Pew Research Center for the People & the Press and the Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. Conducted in July and August of 2010, it examined Americans' attitudes toward a wide range of topics related to religion and public life. Special topics included Barack Obama's religion, the religious right and left, the Tea Party movement, immigration, same-sex marriage, and the influence of religion in politics. The survey also contained a range of items on respondents' religious and political preferences and behavior.
    Funded By: Pew Research Center for the People & the Press Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 4/25/2011
  • Global Attitudes Project, Spring 2010, 22 Nation Survey:
    The Global Attitudes Project, Spring 2010, 22 Nation Survey is a cross-national survey of attitudes on global issues. Topics include politics, social issues, globalization, life satisfaction, and religion. Respondents also were surveyed on their views of the role of the United States in the world and on their impressions of well-known leaders (Barack Obama, Angela Merkel, Vladimir Putin, etc.)

    This survey was conducted both before and after the passage of a controversial Arizona state immigration law. These data allow opportunities to examine the extent to which opinions in Mexico changed after this law was passed.
    Funded By: Pew Research Center - Global Attitudes and Trends
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 8/24/2015
  • American National Election Studies, 2004:
    From the ANES website : The study, in part, maintains and extends the core of the NES time-series by collecting data on Americans' basic political beliefs, allegiances, and behaviors. It contains special instrumentation on American's views on foreign policy, the war on terrorism, and the Iraq War and its consequences. It extends the experiment on the measurement of voter turnout begun in 2002, and carries expanded instrumentation on inflation, immigration, gender politics, and gay and lesbian politics. It also includes the Comparative Studies of Electoral System's Module 2, which focuses on representation and accountability. The data also contain several religion variables, including questions about prayer frequency, importance of religion, attendance at religious services, and belief in the Bible.
    Funded By: The National Science Foundation under grant SES-0118451, the University of Michigan Center for Political Studies , the University of Michigan Office of the Provost , the University of Michigan Political Science Department , and the University of Michigan Survey Research Center .
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 4/4/2006
  • Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey: Ohio Sample:
    The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents' views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants' influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress' ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn.
    Funded By: The Ford Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/14/2012
  • Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey: National Sample:
    The Religion, Values, and Immigration Reform Survey addressed respondents' views on immigration reform in America. The survey gauged views on the immigration system, levels of support for immigration reform policies, and perceptions of immigrants' influence on the economy and the job market. Additional questions focused on attitudes toward both illegal and legal immigrants, the moral implications of immigration, and Congress' ability to handle immigration reform during the economic downturn.
    Funded By: The Ford Foundation
    Collected: 2010, Uploaded 12/14/2012
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-26]  (of 26 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Investigators/Researchers
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • IMMASSIM from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Which of these statements about immigrants comes closest to your view:

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Immigrants should retain their culture of origin and not adopt American culture
    2) Immigrants should retain their culture of origin and also adopt American culture
    3) Immigrants should give up their culture of origin and adopt American culture
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer

  • LETIN1 from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    There are different opinions about immigrants from other countries living in America. (By 'Immigrants' we mean people who come to settle in America.) Do you think the number of immigrants to America nowadays should be...

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Increased a lot
    2) Increased a little
    3) Remain the same as it is
    4) Reduced a little
    5) Reduced a lot
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer

  • LETIN1 from General Social Survey, 2016
    There are different opinions about immigrants from other countries living in America. (By 'Immigrants' we mean people who come to settle in America.) Do you think the number of immigrants to America nowadays should be...

    0) Not applicable
    1) Increased a lot
    2) Increased a little
    3) Remain the same as it is
    4) Reduced a little
    5) Reduced a lot
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer

  • IMMCRIME from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    There are different opinions about immigrants from other countries living in America. (By 'Immigrants' we mean people who come to settle in America.) How much do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements? Immigrants increase crime rates

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Agree strongly
    2) Agree
    3) Neither agree nor disagree
    4) Disagree
    5) Disagree strongly
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer

  • IMMAMECO from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    There are different opinions about immigrants from other countries living in America. (By 'Immigrants' we mean people who come to settle in America.) How much do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements? Immigrants are generally good for America's economy

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Agree strongly
    2) Agree
    3) Neither agree nor disagree
    4) Disagree
    5) Disagree strongly
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer

  • IMMJOBS from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    There are different opinions about immigrants from other countries living in America. (By 'Immigrants' we mean people who come to settle in America.) How much do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements? Immigrants take jobs away from people who were born in America

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Agree strongly
    2) Agree
    3) Neither agree nor disagree
    4) Disagree
    5) Disagree strongly
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer

  • IMMIDEAS from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    There are different opinions about immigrants from other countries living in America. (By 'Immigrants' we mean people who come to settle in America.) How much do you agree or disagree with each of the following statements? Immigrants make America more open to new ideas and cultures

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Agree strongly
    2) Agree
    3) Neither agree nor disagree
    4) Disagree
    5) Disagree strongly
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer

  • LETIN1A from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Do you think the number of immigrants to America nowadays should be...

    0) Inapplicable
    1) Increased a lot
    2) Increased a little
    3) Remain the same as it is
    4) Reduced a little
    5) Reduced a lot, or
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • LETIN1A from General Social Survey, 2018
    Do you think the number of immigrants to America nowadays should be...

    0) Not applicable
    1) Increased a lot
    2) Increased a little
    3) Remain the same as it is
    4) Reduced a little
    5) Reduced a lot
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer

  • JS10 from Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2001
    New immigrants to the state are not as likely to make use of the court system as those who have lived in Nebraska for a long time.

    1) Strongly agree
    2) Agree
    3) Disagree
    4) Strongly disagree
    8) Don't know
    9) Refused

[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 1307 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
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