Measurements
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Measurement Concepts)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Christian nationalism and white racial boundaries: Examining whites' opposition to interracial marriage.
    Perry, Samuel L., and Andrew L. Whitehead (2015)
    Ethnic and Racial Sudies 38:10: 1671-1689.

    Associated Search Terms: Christian Identity; Marriage; Racial attitudes; Prejudice, racial
  • Role strain theory and understanding the role of head clergy of racially diverse churches.
    Edwards, Korie L. (2014)
    Sociology of Religion 75:1: 57-79.

    Based on 2002-03 participant observation & interviews in a Midwest U.S. interracial congregation.

    Associated Search Terms: Role strain; Participant observation; Diversity; Parish; Levels of inclusiveness; Congregation; Clergy role
  • More like us: How religious service attendance hinders interracial romance.
    Perry, Samuel L. (2014)
    Sociology of Religion 75:3: 442-462.

    Analyzes 2007 Baylor Religion Survey data. Desire for religious homogamy explains the relationship between attendance & racial homogamy.

    Associated Search Terms: Marriage; Practice; Race; United States
  • Hoping for a godly (white) family: How desire or religious heritage affects whites' attitudes toward interracial marriage.
    Perry, Samuel L. (2014)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 53:1: 202-218.

    Analyzes 2007 Baylor Religion Survey data. Whites desire for their children to marry whites is in part blended wit a desire to pass on their religious heritage.

    Associated Search Terms: Race; Prejudice, racial; Marriage; United States; Endogamy; Family
  • Religion and whites' attitudes toward interracial marriage with African Americans, Asians, and Latinos.
    Perry, Samuel L. (2013)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 52:2:425-442.

    Analyzes Wave 2, Baylor Religion Survey data (2007, U.S.A.); religious unaffiliates report greater support of interracial marriage, biblical literalists less. Among whites, private devotions & attendance in multiracial congregations are related to greater support.

    Associated Search Terms: Race; Literalism; Marriage; Fundamentalist, U.S.A.; Devotionalism
  • Are interracial daters more supportive of same-sex unions?
    Perry, Samuel L. (2013)
    Social Science Journal 50:2: 252-256.

    Analyzes Wave 2, Baylor Religion Survey data (2007, U.S.A.); religious unaffiliates report greater support of interracial marriage, biblical literalists less. Among whites, private devotions & attendance in multiracial congregations are related to greater support.


    Associated Search Terms: Diversity; Family; Homosexuality; Courtship
  • Religion and interracial romance: The effects of religious affiliation, public and devotional practices, and biblical literalism.
    Perry, Samuel L. (2013)
    Social Science Quarterly 94:1308-1327.

    Analyzes Wave 2, Baylor Religion Survey data (2007, U.S.A.); religious unaffiliates report greater support of interracial marriage, biblical literalists less. Among whites, private devotions & attendance in multiracial congregations are related to greater support.



    Associated Search Terms: Religiosity; Practice; Race; Literalism; Dating
  • Racial habitus, moral conflict, and white moral hegemony within interracial evangelical organizations.
    Perry, Samuel L. (2012)
    Qualitative Sociology 35:1: 89-108.

    Analyzes Wave 2, Baylor Religion Survey data (2007, U.S.A.); religious unaffiliates report greater support of interracial marriage, biblical literalists less. Among whites, private devotions & attendance in multiracial congregations are related to greater support.




    Associated Search Terms: Conflict; Evangelical, U.S.A.; Habitus; Moral; Parachurch agencies; Race
  • An opening in the congregational closet? Boundary-bridging culture and membership privileges for gays and lesbians in Christian religious congregations.
    Adler, Gary J., Jr. (2012)
    Social Problems 59:2:177-206.

    Interfaith volunteering & interracial worship express an organizational approach to social boundaries that prioritizes diversity & openness. With a controversial social issue (homosexuality) & a relative lack of local organizational processes to deal with such an issue, boundary-bridging customs may shape the sexuality boundaries of congregations.

    Associated Search Terms: Homosexuality
  • Contact, congregations, and children of color: The effects of interracial contact in religious settings on whites' attitudes toward transracial adoption.
    Perry, Samuel L. (2011)
    Journal of Comparative Family Studies 42: 851-869.

    Interfaith volunteering & interracial worship express an organizational approach to social boundaries that prioritizes diversity & openness. With a controversial social issue (homosexuality) & a relative lack of local organizational processes to deal with such an issue, boundary-bridging customs may shape the sexuality boundaries of congregations.


    Associated Search Terms: Race; Racial attitudes; Adoption
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-23]  (of 23 total matches in Citations)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • V433 from Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS)
    Race/ethnic identification: How do you identify, that is, what do you call yourself?

    0) American
    2) White, caucasian
    3) African-American
    4) Black
    5) Hispani
    6) Latino/a
    7) Latin American
    8) Chicano/a
    9) Mexican
    10) Mexican-American
    11) Cuban
    12) Cuban-American
    13) Nicaraguan
    14) Nicaraguan-American
    15) Colombian
    16) Colombian-American
    17) Dominican
    18) Dominican-American
    19) Other Latin American nationality
    20) Other hyphenated Latin American nationality
    22) Filipino/a
    23) Filipino-American
    24) Vietnamese
    25) Vietnamese-American
    26) Lao
    27) Lao-American
    28) Cambodian
    29) Cambodian-American
    30) Hmong
    31) Hmong-American
    32) Chinese, Taiwanese
    33) Chinese-American, Taiwanese-American
    34) Japanese
    35) Japanese-American
    36) Korean
    37) Korean-American
    38) Indian
    39) Indian-American
    41) Thai-American
    42) Chinese-Vietnamese
    44) Other Asian or Middle Eastern nationalities
    45) Other hyphenated Asian or Middle Eastern nationalities
    46) Asian
    47) Asian-American
    48) Asian-White
    49) Other interracial
    50) Mestizo
    51) Haitian
    52) Haitian-American
    53) Jamaican
    54) Jamaican-American
    55) West Indian
    56) West Indian nationality
    57) Hyphenated West Indian-American
    59) Canadian-American
    60) European nationality
    61) Hyphenated European nationality
    62) African Nationality
    63) Hyphenated African nationality
    65) Other hyphenated nationality
    66) Mixed nationalities
    67) Nationality + white
    68) Nationality + black
    69) Nationality + Asian
    70) Nationality + Hispanic
    71) Human being
    72) Other identity
    73) Jewish
    97) 97
    99) 99

  • V437 from Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (CILS)
    Respondent spouse ethnicity: What is the ethnicity of your spouse or partner?

    0) American
    2) White, caucasian
    3) African-American
    4) Black
    5) Hispani
    6) Latino/a
    7) Latin American
    8) Chicano/a
    9) Mexican
    10) Mexican-American
    11) Cuban
    12) Cuban-American
    13) Nicaraguan
    14) Nicaraguan-American
    15) Colombian
    16) Colombian-American
    17) Dominican
    18) Dominican-American
    19) Other Latin American nationality
    20) Other hyphenated Latin American nationality
    22) Filipino/a
    23) Filipino-American
    24) Vietnamese
    25) Vietnamese-American
    26) Lao
    27) Lao-American
    28) Cambodian
    29) Cambodian-American
    30) Hmong
    31) Hmong-American
    32) Chinese, Taiwanese
    33) Chinese-American, Taiwanese-American
    34) Japanese
    35) Japanese-American
    36) Korean
    37) Korean-American
    38) Indian
    39) Indian-American
    41) Thai-American
    42) Chinese-Vietnamese
    43) 43
    44) Other Asian or Middle Eastern nationalities
    45) Other hyphenated Asian or Middle Eastern nationalities
    46) Asian
    47) Asian-American
    48) Asian-White
    49) Other interracial
    50) Mestizo
    51) Haitian
    52) Haitian-American
    53) Jamaican
    54) Jamaican-American
    55) West Indian
    56) West Indian nationality
    57) Hyphenated West Indian-American
    58) 58
    59) Canadian-American
    60) European nationality
    61) Hyphenated European nationality
    62) African Nationality
    63) Hyphenated African nationality
    64) 64
    65) Other hyphenated nationality
    66) Mixed nationalities
    67) Nationality + white
    68) Nationality + black
    69) Nationality + Asian
    70) Nationality + Hispanic
    71) Human being
    72) Other identity
    73) Jewish
    99) 99

  • CULTUNIQ from Lilly Survey of Attitudes and Social Networks
    This is a somewhat long question, so please feel free to ask me to repeat it. Some people say that we are better off if the races maintain their cultural uniqueness, even if we have limited personal relationships between races. Others say that we should create a common culture and close interracial friendships, even though the races may lose their cultural uniqueness. Which one do you prefer?

    0) Refused
    1) Maintain cultural uniqueness
    2) Create a common culture
    3) Combination
    9) Don't know

  • INTERDAT from Southern Focus Poll, Non-South Survey, Spring 1997
    Thinking about interracial dating, do you think it has become more common, less common, or remained about the same over the past 5 years?

    1) MORE COMMON
    2) LESS COMMON
    3) REMAINED THE SAME

  • ISSUBIMR from Notre Dame Study of Catholic Parish Life: Parishioners Sample, 1984
    Do you strongly agree, agree, disagree, or strongly disagree with the following statements? - Interracial marriages are morally acceptable.

    1) Strongly disagree
    2) Disagree
    3) Agree
    4) Strongly agree

  • INTERDAT from Southern Focus Poll, South Survey, Spring 1997
    Thinking about interracial dating, do you think it has become more common, less common, or remained about the same over the past 5 years?

    1) MORE COMMON
    2) LESS COMMON
    3) REMAINED THE SAME

  • INTERDAT from Southern Focus Poll, Oversample Survey, Spring 1997
    Thinking about interracial dating, do you think it has become more common, less common, or remained about the same over the past 5 years?

    1) More common
    2) Less common
    3) Remained the same
    4) Don't know/No answer

  • STATE2 from Notre Dame Study of Catholic Parish Life: Volunteer Leaders Sample, 1983
    Do you strongly agree, agree, disagree or strongly disagree with the following statements? - Interracial marriages are morally acceptable.

    1) Strongly agree
    2) Agree
    3) Disagree
    4) Strongly disagree

  • STATE2 from Notre Dame Study of Catholic Parish Life: the Pastors Sample, 1983
    Do you strongly agree, agree, disagree or strongly disagree with the following statements? - Interracial marriages are morally acceptable.

    1) Strongly agree
    2) Agree
    3) Disagree
    4) Strongly disagree

  • PARSTA2 from Notre Dame Study of Catholic Parish Life: the Pastors Sample, 1983
    Do you think an average parishioner in your parish would strongly agree, agree, disagree or strongly disagree with the following statements? - Interracial marriages are morally acceptable.

    1) Strongly agree
    2) Agree
    3) Disagree
    4) Strongly disagree

[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-11]  (of 11 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
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