Site Features
  • Theories, Concepts & Measures: Theories, Concepts & Measures links major Theories to Concepts and Measures from available datasets in an interactive format.
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Site Features)
Timeline
  • Missionary Member Care Movement: Beginning in 1980, the Missionary Member Care Movement sought to reduce missionary attrition and provide more holistic care to humanitarian workers.
  • Church of Scientology: In 1954, L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) began the Church of Scientology with teachings on how to reach a blissful "state of clear."
  • Eddy, Mary Baker: Mary Baker Eddy (1821-1910) founded the Christian Science movement.
  • Hubbard, L. Ron: L. Ron Hubbard (1911-1986) founded Scientology, a controversial new religious movement.
[Viewing Matches 1-4]  (of 4 total matches in Timelines)
ARDA Dictionary
  • Mental Health Measures:Questions covering issues pertaining to an individual's mental health, views of mental health, attitudes toward those with mental health issues, medication, government intervention, etc. Definitions of good mental health vary, as do ways to measure mental health. Particular measures related to mental health, such as views of mental health, attitudes toward those with mental health issues, medication and mental health, government intervention, etc., can be found in the following ARDA datasets: HEALTH2 - 1997 Faith and Community Survey of Four Indianapolis Neighborhoods, MNTLHLTH - 2004 General Social Survey, EVMHP - 1996 General Social Survey, OUTSIDER - 2002 General Social Survey, PSYCMED4 - 2006 General Social Survey, SEENMNTL - 1998 General Social Survey MNTLHLTH - 2002 General Social Survey, SPMENTL - 1996 General Social Survey, KNWMHOSP - 1996 General Social Survey, MHTRTSLF - 2006 General Social Survey.
  • Mental Health:Mental health broadly refers to a person's psychological and emotional condition.
  • Mental Health, Religion and:Mental health consists of positive and negative dimensions. Positive mental health includes positive emotions (e.g., happiness, peace, etc.) as well as positive cognitive processes (e.g., optimistic thinking and adaptation), while negative mental health involves emotions, cognitions and behaviors that cause dysfunction in social relationships, occupation and recreation, and interfere with adaptation (e.g., anger, violence, addiction, etc.; see Koenig et al. 2012: 298). In the area of religion and health, an estimated 80 percent of studies focus specifically on mental health (Koenig 2012). In general, religiousness tends to improve positive mental health and reduce negative mental health outcomes. Examining hundreds of studies on mental health and religion, Koenig and colleagues (2012) found that religion/spirituality tends to improve mental well-being, increase hope/optimism, reduce loneliness/depression, increase social capital, reduce substance abuse and improve marital outcomes. There are, however, some studies that do not find religion to be a positive factor for mental health. For example, traditional religiousness is associated with the negative personality traits of authoritarianism (Shaffer and Hastings 2007; Watson et al. 2003) and neuroticism (Duriez and Soenens 2006; Jaarmsa et al. 2007). Nonetheless, the general conclusions from previous studies is that religion, as means to promote meaning, happiness and self-control, tends to be positively associated with beneficial mental health outcomes.
  • Spiritual, Religious, and Personal Beliefs (SRPB) Scale:As a subscale of the World Health Organization's Quality of Life (WHOQOL) scale, the Spiritual, Religious and Personal Beliefs (SRPB) scale assesses spirituality in health studies. Studies have found that SRPB was associated with better mental and physical health (see Saxena 2006). However, five of the eight dimensions of the subscale are so closely tied with mental health (e.g., hopefulness, meaning in life, peace, etc.) that the findings become somewhat circular and unclear, according to some researchers (see Koenig et al. 2012).
  • Religious Doubts:Doubting or questioning one's religion can take many forms, and religious doubts have been linked to adverse effects on mental health and well-being (Galek et al. 2007), though when framed as a change process, religious doubts can lead to psychological growth (see religious quest).
  • Prayer, Health Benefits of:Studies on the health benefits of prayer tend to be mixed, particularly in the context of intercessory prayer (praying on the behalf of others). Hodge (2007), in his meta-analysis of intercessory prayer studies, found that prayer produced with a small, but significant, association with health benefits among 7 of 17 studies, though the more rigorous studies tended to not produce significant results. In contrast, studies generally find that the person doing the praying, either for oneself or for others, tends to receive mental health benefits from it. A study by Boelens and colleagues (2009) found that prayer sessions with patients at a primary care office tended to lower their depression and anxiety while increasing optimism. However, sometimes prayer and religion is used as replacements for professional medical help, which can be dangerous for health outcomes (see Koenig et al. 2012). In sum, the person doing the praying, and how prayer is used in conjunction with medical services, matter when examining the health benefits of prayer.
  • Yoga:A term meaning "union," specifically referring to union with the divine. Early forms of yoga were related to ascetic practices and Hindu philosophy, but now many use it for physical fitness and mental health. In 1893, yoga was introduced to Americans by Swami Vivekananda, the first Hindu missionary in the United States. The practice took off in the 1950s and 1960s, and now it is considered mainstream (Prothero 2008: 291).
  • Brief RCOPE:A 14-item scale that is widely used by psychologists to measure religious coping (Pargament et al. 1998). Seven items assess positive religious coping strategies (e.g., seeking spiritual support, seeking religious help to forgive others, collaborating with God, etc.), while the other seven items measure negative religious coping strategies (e.g., believing God is punishing them, not loving, or has deserted them). Although positive coping tends to be more prevalent than negative coping, both tend to present themselves to some degree given the situation (see Koenig, Pargament, and Nielsen 1998). Many studies find that negative religious coping is associated with poor mental health, although there have been some cases where positive religious coping also was associated with poor mental health (for a discussion, see Koenig et al. 2012: 94-120). There also is a long version of the Brief RCOPE, known simply as the RCOPE, which consists of 105 items.
  • Counseling, Religious:A type of counseling that incorporates religious teachings to serve mental health needs. Many clients are already religious, although counselors may reach out to those nominally religious, homeless or poor. Depending on the particular faith group, counseling may incorporate prayer, meditation or scripture reading. Some forms of religious counseling may be completely faith-based, while others may incorporate secular therapeutic practices (Koenig, King and Carson 2012: 56-57).
  • Daily Spirituality Experiences (DSE) Scale:A popular scale used to assess spirituality in health studies (Underwood and Teresi 2002). The scale is actually a subscale of the widely used Fetzer Institute's Multidimensional Measure of Religiousness and Spirituality. It consists of either six or 16 items, depending on whether the researcher is using the long or short form. Some of the items include, “I feel deep inner peace of harmony," “I am spiritually touched by the beauty of creation” and “I feel thankful in my blessings.” However, Koenig and colleagues (2012) argue that the scale suffers from measurement contamination, as it is unclear whether some of the items are measures of spirituality or outcomes that are the result of spirituality. For example, is feeling peaceful the sign of spirituality or the result that comes from being spiritual? When used to predict other mental health outcomes, findings become difficult to interpret and tautological (i.e., the independent and dependent variables reflect the same phenomenon). Similar concerns have been voiced regarding the CAM, FACIT-SP and WHOQO-SRPB scales (see Koenig et al. 2012: 43-44).
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-11]  (of 11 total matches in the ARDA Dictionary)
Religious Membership County Reports
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in RCMS County Reports)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • The influence of close ties on depression: Does network religiosity matter?
    Upenieks, Laura (2020)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 59:3: 484-508.
    Analyzes 2006 Portraits of American Life Study data; a greater number of network ties that discuss religion & pray for the respondent are detrimental to the mental health of those of a low religious salience.
    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Network; Salience
  • Belief in supernatural evil and mental health: Do secure attachment to God and gender matter?
    Jung, Jong Hyun (2020)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 59:1: 141-160.
    Analyzes 2010 Baylor Religion Survey data (U.S.A.). Belief in supernatural evil is positively associated with anxiety & paranoia, but attachment to God buffers this relationship for women.
    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Belief; Gender
  • Attributing problem-solving to God, receiving social support, and stress-moderation
    Rainville, G. "Chuck"; and Neal Krause (2020)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 59:3: 476-483
    Analyzes AARP Brain Health and Mental Health survey data (U.S.A. adults). Viewing God as a problem solver had a stress-buffering effect among those receiving low social support, and a stress-exacerbator among those already receiving high levels of social support.
    Associated Search Terms: God, image of; Health; Stress; Social support
  • Does religion buffer the effects of discrimination on distress for religious minorities? The case of Arab Americans.
    Shah, Sarah (2019)
    Society and MentalHealth 9:2: 171-191.
    Analyzes Detroit Arab American Survey data (2003). Salience of God and salient practices buffer stress from discrimination.
    Associated Search Terms: Discrimination; Arab Americans; Practice; United States, Michigan, Detroit; Stress; Salience
  • African American and European American clergy's ounseling of older adults.
    Pickard, Joseph G., Sharon D. Johnson, Huei-Wern Shen, and Erin L. Mason (2019)
    Review of Religious Reseach 61:3: 221-234.
    Analyzes questionnaire data from Christian clergy in the St. Louis, Missouri, metropolitan area. African American, Catholic, & clergy with mental health training spend greater percentages of their time counseling older people.
    Associated Search Terms: Catholic, U.S.A.; Clergy role; African Americans; Gerontology; United States, Missouri, St. Louis
  • Miscarriage, religious participation, and mental health.
    Petts, Richard J. (2018)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 57:1: 109-122.
    Analyzes 1997-2010 panel interview data from the National Longitudinal Study of Youth (U.S.A.). Women who had miscarriages had better mental health if they were religious.
    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Panel study; Women; Coping
  • Secularity, religiosity, and health: Physical and mental health differences between atheists, agnostics, and nonaffiliated theists compared to religiously affiliated individuals.
    Baker, Joseph O., Samuel Stroope, and Mark H. Walker (2018)
    Social Science Research 75: 44-57.
    Using a national sample of U.S.A. adults, compares physical & mental health outcomes for atheists, agnostics, religiously nonaffiliated theists, & theistic members of organized religious traditions. Atheists had better physical health than other secular individuals & members of some religious traditions & reported significantly lower levels of psychiatric symptoms than both other seculars & members of most religious traditions. In contrast, physical & mental health were significantly worse for nonaffiliated theists compared to other seculars & religious affiliates on most outcomes.
    Associated Search Terms: Mental health; Health; Atheist, U.S.A.
  • Childhood adversity, religion, and change in adult mental health.
    Jung, Jong Hyun (2018)
    Research on Aging 40:2: 155-179.
    Using longitudinal data from a representative sample of American adults ( N = 1,635), I find that religious salience & spirituality buffer the noxious effects of childhood abuse on change in positive affect over time. By contrast, these stress-buffering properties of religion fail to emerge when negative affect serves as the outcome measure.
    Associated Search Terms: Mental health
  • Goal striving stress and self-concept: The moderating role of perceived divine control.
    DeAngelis, Reed T. (2018)
    Society and Mental Health 8:2: 141-156.
    (1) goal-striving stress inversely associated with self-esteem and mastery, net of a number of statistical controls; (2) perceived divine control attenuated the inverse association between goal-striving stress & self-esteem; but (3) perceived divine control amplified the inverse association between goal-striving stress & mastery.
    Associated Search Terms: Stress; Self concept; Control, divine
  • "Let the heavens be glad, and the earth rejoice": Religion and life satisfaction among emerging adults in the United States.
    Desmond, Scott A., Rachel Kraus, and Brendan J.L. Dugan (2018)
    Mental Health, Religion and Culture 21(3): 304–318.
    Based on the 3rd wave of the National Study of Youth and Religion; private devotion & religious efficacy are significantly related to greater life satisfaction among emerging adults. Participation in organised religion, religious salience, otherworldly beliefs, number of religious friends, and being spiritual but not religious are not related to greater life satisfaction.
    Associated Search Terms: Life satisfaction; Young adults; Youth
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 188 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • Baylor Religion Survey, Wave V (2017):
    Wave V of the Baylor Religion Survey (2017), also known as "The Values and Beliefs of the American Public - A National Study," was administered by Gallup and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. It covers topics of the geography of religion; religious behaviors and attitudes; morality and politics; mental health and religion; intersection of technology and religion; race and ethnicity; the religious, political and ideological values of Trump voters; and basic demographics.
    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 4/20/2020
  • General Social Survey, 2006:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS is designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. The 2006 GSS features special modules on mental health and social networks. Items on religion cover denominational affiliation, church attendance, religious upbringing, personal beliefs, and religious experiences.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 9/14/2007
  • General Social Survey, 2002:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 2002 GSS include questions on religious self-identification, denominational affiliation, church attendance, personal beliefs, and religious upbringing.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 11/17/2003
  • General Social Survey, 2000:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 2000 GSS include a module on religion (with items measuring religious self-identification, religious schooling, congregational affiliation, church attendance, and local church performance).

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 2000, Uploaded 4/12/2002
  • General Social Survey, 1996:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items on religion include religious preference, church attendance, beliefs about the Bible, attitudes toward organized religion and its opponents, and more. In addition, it contains a special module examining respondents' images of God. The survey also contains topical modules on national identity, the role of government, and mental health.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 11/10/2008
  • Baylor Religion Survey, Wave V (2017) - Instructional Dataset:
    This file contains all of the cases and variables that are in the original 2017 Baylor Religion Survey, but is prepared for easier use in the classroom. Changes have been made in two areas. First, to avoid confusion when constructing tables or interpreting basic analysis, all missing data codes and "don't know" responses have been set to system missing. Second, many of the continuous variables have been categorized into fewer categories, and added as additional variables to the file.

    Wave V of the Baylor Religion Survey (2017), also known as "The Values and Beliefs of the American Public - A National Study," was administered by Gallup and funded by the John Templeton Foundation. It covers topics of the geography of religion; religious behaviors and attitudes; morality and politics; mental health and religion; intersection of technology and religion; race and ethnicity; the religious, political and ideological values of Trump voters; and basic demographics.


    Funded By: The John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/26/2020
  • General Social Survey, 1998:
    The General Social Surveys (GSS) have been conducted by the National Opinion Research Center annually since 1972 except for the years 1979, 1981, and 1992 (a supplement was added in 1992), and biennially beginning in 1994. The GSS are designed as part of a program of social indicator research, replicating questionnaire items and wording in order to facilitate time-trend studies. Items in the 1998 GSS include special modules on religion (with items measuring giving, volunteering, religious self-identification, religious schooling, congregational affiliation, and spiritualism), culture, job experiences, inter-racial friendships, national security, medical care, medical ethics, and the social security system.

    To download syntax files for the GSS that reproduce well-known religious group recodes, including RELTRAD, please visit the ARDA's Syntax Repository .
    Funded By: National Science Foundation , National Opinion Research Center (NORC) , The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , the Fetzer Institute , Academy Sinica, the Lilly Corporation, the National Institutes of Mental Health , the Office of Naval Research , the American Association of Retired Persons , and the Luce Foundation .
    Collected: 1998, Uploaded 12/20/2000
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Family Health History (Parent), Parents (2015-2017):
    Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) gathered social, behavioral, and health survey data in 2015-2017 on a probability sample of the Add Health parents who were originally interviewed in 1995. Data for 2,013 Wave I parents, ranging in age from 50-80 years and representing 2,244 Add Health sample members, are available. Add Health Parent Study Wave I Parents were the biological, adoptive, or stepparent of an Add Health child; not deceased or incarcerated at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling; and had at least one Add Health child who is also not deceased at the time of Parents (2015-2017) sampling. The Add Health Parent Study interview also gathered survey data on the current cohabiting Spouse or Partner of Wave I Parents who completed the interview. Nine hundred eighty-eight (988) current Spouse/Partner interviews are available. These data can be linked with Wave I parent data, and corresponding Add Health respondents at Waves I – V.

    The Add Health Parent Study (2015-2017) interview is a comprehensive survey of Add Health parents' family relations, education, religious beliefs, physical and mental health, social support, and community involvement experiences. In particular, the study was designed to improve the understanding of the role that families play through socioeconomic channels in the health and well-being of the older, parent generation and that of their offspring. This unique data set supports the analyses of intergenerational transmissions of (dis)advantage that have not been possible to date. Add Health Parent Study data permits the examination of both short-term and long-term linkages and interactions between parents and their adult children.

    For more information, please visit the Add Health Parent Study official website here .

    The file contains data from Wave I Parent's family health history leave-behind forms. The name of the file is “fhhp2” on official Add Health data documentation .
    Funded By: National Institute on Aging of the National Institutes of Health.
    Collected: 2017, Uploaded 10/21/2019
  • Culturally Adapted Spiritually Oriented Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Child Survivors of Restavek:
    Restavek is a form of modern-day slavery that is estimated to affect 300,000 (i.e., approximately 1 in 10) children in Haiti. It typically involves a child from a poor rural family being sent to work as an indentured domestic servant for an affluent urban family. Restavek children experience a high rate of trauma, as well as other mental health concerns.The present study explored the effectiveness of a culturally adapted form of Spiritually Oriented Trauma-Focused Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy (SO-TF-CBT), a treatment model for assessing and treating religious and spiritual issues within the standard TF-CBT protocol (an evidence-based treatment for childhood trauma). This study involved 20 control participants and 38 treatment participants assigned to a 12-session protocol. The primary research question of the present study is whether a culturally adapted SO-TFCBT intervention, relative to a control, would lead to a reduction in posttraumatic stress symptoms among child survivors of Restavek in Haiti. Because SO-TF-CBT also targets potential religious and spiritual issues related to trauma, a secondary research question examined the effects of this intervention on participants' tendencies to experience spiritual struggles. In the interests of better addressing the mental health treatment gap among this population in Haiti, our study also investigated, as a secondary goal, whether this treatment could be effectively delivered by people with less formal mental health training. Specifically, we examined three distinct delivery methods: (a) community- based lay counselors, (b) NGO staff volunteers, and (c) undergraduate students from a local university.
    Funded By: This survey is part of a larger grant from the John Templeton Foundation entitled "Earth as a School: Finding Meaning, Relating to God, and Experiencing Growth After a Natural Disaster" (#44040) .
    Collected: 2015, Uploaded 10/29/2018
  • Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey, 2004:
    The Nebraska Annual Social Indicators Survey (NASIS) aims to survey quality of life in the state of Nebraska, covering topics such as the environment, housing, health, recreation, occupation, education, family life, among others. A set of core questions are repeated each year and additional questions are purchased by those interested in gathering additional data. The 2004 NASIS asks questions about outdoor and recreational activities, environmental conservation issues, household composition, job situation, civic attitudes and behavior, mental health and attitudes toward criminal justice.
    Funded By: Department of Sociology at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln , Bureau of Sociological Research , and other state agencies and educational and research organizations
    Collected: 2004, Uploaded 12/3/2018
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-28]  (of 28 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Investigators/Researchers
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Investigators)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • MHTREATD from General Social Survey, 2018
    Did you get treatment for your mental health problem?
    0) Not applicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    9) No answer
  • MHTREAT1 from General Social Survey, 2018
    Is [NAME 1] currently receiving treatment for their mental health problem?
    0) Not applicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    3) Unsure
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer
  • MHTREAT2 from General Social Survey, 2018
    Is [NAME 2] currently receiving treatment for their mental health problem?
    0) Not applicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    3) Unsure
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer
  • MHTREAT3 from General Social Survey, 2018
    Is [NAME 3] currently receiving treatment for their mental health problem?
    0) Not applicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    3) Unsure
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer
  • MHTREAT4 from General Social Survey, 2018
    Is [NAME 4] currently receiving treatment for their mental health problem?
    0) Not applicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    3) Unsure
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer
  • MHTREAT5 from General Social Survey, 2018
    Is [NAME 5] currently receiving treatment for their mental health problem?
    0) Not applicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    3) Unsure
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer
  • MENTLOTH from General Social Survey, 2018
    Should [NAME] go to a therapist, or counselor, like a psychologist, social worker, or other mental health professional for help?
    0) Not applicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer
  • MNTLHLTH from General Social Survey 2014 Cross-Section and Panel Combined
    Now thinking about your mental health, which includes stress, depression, and problems with emotions, for how many days during the past 30 days was your mental health not good?
    -1) Inapplicable
    0) 0
    1) 1
    2) 2
    3) 3
    4) 4
    5) 5
    6) 6
    7) 7
    8) 8
    9) 9
    10) 10
    12) 12
    14) 14
    15) 15
    20) 20
    21) 21
    24) 24
    25) 25
    28) 28
    30) 30
    98) Don't know
    99) No answer
  • DIAGNOSD from General Social Survey, 2018
    Now, a few more questions about you and your opinions. Have you ever been diagnosed with a mental health problem?
    0) Not applicable
    1) Yes
    2) No
    8) Don't know
    9) No answer
  • MNTLHLTH from General Social Survey, 2018
    Now thinking about your mental health, which includes stress, depression, and problems with emotions, for how many days during the past 30 days was your mental health not good?
    -1) Not applicable
    0) 0
    1) 1
    2) 2
    3) 3
    4) 4
    5) 5
    6) 6
    7) 7
    8) 8
    9) 9
    10) 10
    11) 11
    12) 12
    14) 14
    15) 15
    16) 16
    18) 18
    20) 20
    22) 22
    25) 25
    29) 29
    30) 30
    98) Don't know
    99) No answer
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 621 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
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