Site Features
  • Compare Yourself Survey (Youth): This online survey allows you to answer questions about religion and then compare yourself to respondents in the National Study of Youth and Religion.
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Site Features)
ARDA Dictionary
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Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Religiosity and premarital sexual behaviors among adolescents: An analysis of functional form.
    Hayward, George M. (2019)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 58:2: 439-458.

    Analyzes 2003 & '15 National Study of Youth and Religion (USA) data. The inverse relationship between religiosity & sexual activity among adolescents is nonlinear.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Religiosity; Sexual activity
  • The moral community divide: Underage marijuana use across religious contexts.
    Nie, Fanhao, and Xiaozhao Yousef Yang (2019)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 58:1: 153-173.

    Analyzes county-level data from the U.S. Census and Religious congregations and Membership Study, with National Study of Youth and Religion data. Higher Catholic population proportions predict underage marijuana use inversely.

    Associated Search Terms: Contextual effects; Marijuana; Deviance/social control; Catholic, U.S.A.; Adolescents; Drug
  • Religiosity, marijuana use, and binge drinking: A test of the moral community hypothesis.
    Rivera, Craig J., Timothy R. Lauger, and Michael A. Cretacci (2018)
    Sociology of Religion 79:3: 356-378.

    Analyzes 2007-08 National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.) data. Integration into a micro moral community strengthens the inverse association of religiosity with binge drinking & marijuana use.

    Associated Search Terms: Moral community; Young adults; Religiosity; Marijuana; Network; Contextual effects; Alcohol; Adolescents; Deviance/social control
  • Religious context matters: Exploring the relationship between religious context and underage alcohol consumption.
    Nie, Fanhao, Xiaozhao Yousef Yang, and Daniel V.A. Olson (2018)
    Review of Religious Research 60:2: 199-222.

    Analyzes 2003 & '05 National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.), U.S. Census, & Religious congregations and Membership Study data. Higher percentages of conservative Protestants & Catholics in county populations predicted higher rates of adolescent drunkenness.

    Associated Search Terms: Adolescents; Alcohol; Catholic, U.S.A.; Conservative, U.S.A.; Contextual effects; Evangelical, U.S.A.
  • What God has joined together: Family formation and religion among young adults.
    Denton, Melinda Lundquist, and Jeremy E. Uecker (2018)
    Review of Religious Research 60:1: 1-22.

    Analyzes survey data from waves 3 (18-24 years old) & 4 (23-28 yrs.) from the National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.). Marriage with children is associated with attendance, & marriage with salience.

    Associated Search Terms: Salience; Family; Marriage; Panel study; Practice; Young adults
  • "Let the heavens be glad, and the earth rejoice": Religion and life satisfaction among emerging adults in the United States.
    Desmond, Scott A., Rachel Kraus, and Brendan J.L. Dugan (2018)
    Mental Health, Religion and Culture 21(3): 304318.

    Based on the 3rd wave of the National Study of Youth and Religion; private devotion & religious efficacy are significantly related to greater life satisfaction among emerging adults. Participation in organised religion, religious salience, otherworldly beliefs, number of religious friends, and being spiritual but not religious are not related to greater life satisfaction.

    Associated Search Terms: Youth; Young adults; Life satisfaction
  • Measuring five dimensions of religiosity across adolescence.
    Pearce, Lisa D., George M. Hayward, and Jessica A. Pearlman (2017)
    Review of Religious Research 59:3: 367-393.

    Uses 2002 & '03 National Study of Youth and Religion (telephone survey data, U.S.A.) data to construct & validate a model.

    Associated Search Terms: Practice; Survey; Privatism; Methods; Exclusivism; Salience; Belief; Adolescents; Adolescence; Dimensions of religiosity
  • The positives and negatives of higher education: How the religious context in adolescence moderates the effects of education on changes in religiosity.
    Schwadel, Philip (2017)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 56:4: 869-885.

    Analyzes National Study of Youth and Religion (U.S.A.) panel data; higher education likely leads to religious decline for mainline Protestants & those with religiously active parents, & increases in religiosity for nones & those where parents attended infrequently.

    Associated Search Terms: Young adults; Adolescence; Socialization; Religiosity; Education; Family; Panel study
  • Demonic influence: The negative mental health effects of belief in demons
    Nie, Fanhao, and Daniel V.A. Olson (2016)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 55:3: 498-515.

    Analyzes 2003-08 panel National Study of Youth and Religion (US.A.) data. Belief in malevolent spirits predicts lower mental health scores among adolescents & declines in the scores in young adulthood.

    Associated Search Terms: Youth; Panel study; Mental health; Young adults; Belief; Adolescents; Devil
  • Faith and Facebook in a pluralistic age: The effects of social networking sites on the religious beliefs of emerging adults.
    McClure, Paul K. (2016)
    Sociological Perspectives 59(4): 818834.

    Using panel data from the National Study of Youth and Religion, I find that emerging adults who use social networking sites are more likely to think it is acceptable to pick & choose their religious beliefs, & practice multiple religions independently of what their religious tradition teaches, but they are not more likely to believe all religions are true.

    Associated Search Terms: Internet; Syncretism; Young adults
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-23]  (of 23 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • National Study of Youth and Religion, Wave 1 (2003):
    The National Survey of Youth and Religion (NSYR) is a nationally representative telephone survey of 3,290 English and Spanish-speaking teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17, and their parents. The NSYR also includes 80 oversampled Jewish households, not nationally representative, bringing the total number of completed NSYR cases to 3,370. The purpose of the NSYR is to research the shape and influence of religion and spirituality in the lives of American youth; to identify effective practices in the religious, moral, and social formation of the lives of youth; to describe the extent and perceived effectiveness of the programs and opportunities that religious communities are offering to their youth; and to foster an informed national discussion about the influence of religion in youth's lives, in order to encourage sustained reflection about and rethinking of our cultural and institutional practices with regard to youth and religion.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc.
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 5/8/2007
  • National Study of Youth and Religion, Wave 3 (2007-2008):
    In Wave 3 every attempt was made to re-interview all English-speaking Wave 1 youth survey respondents. At the time of this third survey the respondents were between the ages of 18-24. The survey was conducted from September 24, 2007 through April 21, 2008 using a Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) system programmed using Blaise software. The Howard W. Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Odum Institute) was hired to field the Wave 3 survey. Telephone calls were spread out over varying days and times, including nights and weekends. Every effort was made to re-contact and re-survey all original NSYR respondents (whether they completed the Wave 2 telephone survey or not), including those out of the country, in the military, and on religious missions. There were more difficulties in contacting and completing the survey with respondents who were in the military during Wave 3 because some of them were serving on active duty and were unable to be reached. Even their families were often unaware of their specific locations and did not have any knowledge of phone numbers or addresses where they could be reached. The Wave 3 Survey instrument replicated many of the questions asked in Waves 1 and 2 with some changes made to better capture the respondents' lives as they grew older. For example, there were fewer questions on parental monitoring and more on post-high school educational aspirations.

    Many variable names have been truncated to allow for downloading of the data set as an SPSS portable file. Original variable names are shown in parentheses at the beginning of each variable description.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc.
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 9/14/2009
  • National Study of Youth and Religion, Wave 2 (2005):
    The second wave of the NSYR longitudinal telephone survey was designed to be a re-interview of all Wave 1 youth survey respondents. Parents of the youth respondents were not re-interviewed. At the time of this second survey the respondents were between the ages of 16-21. Like the Wave 1 survey, the Wave 2 survey was conducted by telephone using a Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) system. The survey was conducted from June 9, 2005 to November 24, 2005. For this second wave of the survey, we only conducted interviews in English. Four youth respondents did not participate in the Wave 2 interview due to not being able to understand or speak English. We did translate our pre-survey mailing to Spanish for respondents we knew to have Spanish-speaking parents or guardians. Additionally, a call center staff member was available to conduct the verbal parental consent in Spanish. The Wave 2 telephone survey questionnaire covers many of the same topics as the Wave 1 questionnaire. Many of the questions are identical so that change can be measured precisely. However, the Wave 2 questionnaire was re-designed to take into account changes in the lives of the respondents as they began to enter young adulthood. The Wave 2 survey includes new questions pertaining to behaviors occurring during the transition to adulthood, such as non-marital cohabitation, educational and career aspirations, pregnancy and marriage.

    Many variable names have been truncated to allow for downloading of the data set as an SPSS portable file. Original variable names are shown in parentheses at the beginning of each variable description.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc.
    Collected: 2005, Uploaded 9/14/2009
  • Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Youth Component:
    The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different, 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and on behavior.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , with 13 participating national youth-serving organizations (African Methodist Episcopal Church, American Lutheran Church, Baptist General Conference, Churches of God-General Conference, Evangelical Covenant Church, 4-H Extension, Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, National Associations of Homes for Children, National Catholic Educational Association, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A), Southern Baptist Convention, United Church of Christ, United Methodist Church)
    Collected: 1984, Uploaded 10/19/1999
  • Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Father Component:
    The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and on behavior
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , with 13 participating national youth-serving organizations (African Methodist Episcopal Church, American Lutheran Church, Baptist General Conference, Churches of God-General Conference, Evangelical Covenant Church, 4-H Extension, Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, National Associations of Homes for Children, National Catholic Educational Association, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A), Southern Baptist Convention, United Church of Christ, United Methodist Church)
    Collected: 1984, Uploaded 10/19/1999
  • Young Adolescents and Their Parents: A National Study, 1984 - Mother Component:
    The Young Adolescents and their Parents project began in 1980, with major funding provided by the Lilly Endowment, Inc. The project brought together the research capability of Search Institute and the programming expertise of 13 national youth-serving organizations. The research component included a 319-item survey given to more than 8,000 fifth- through ninth-grade young adolescents and a different 328-item survey administered to more than 10,000 parents of these youths. Because so little previous research had focused on young adolescents and their families, this project was designed to fill this "information gap." The surveys covered the topics of social context (school, friends, church, families, mass media exposure, group involvement); developmental processes (autonomy, maturation and sexuality, identity, intimacy, achievement, social integration); beliefs, attitudes and values (social attitudes, worries, moral values, religion); and perspectives on receiving help and behavior
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc. , with 13 participating national youth-serving organizations (African Methodist Episcopal Church, American Lutheran Church, Baptist General Conference, Churches of God-General Conference, Evangelical Covenant Church, 4-H Extension, Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod, National Associations of Homes for Children, National Catholic Educational Association, Presbyterian Church (U.S.A), Southern Baptist Convention, United Church of Christ, United Methodist Church)
    Collected: 1984, Uploaded 10/19/1999
[Viewing Matches 1-6]  (of 6 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Investigators/Researchers
[Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in Investigators)
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