QuickStats
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in QuickStats)
Timeline
  • Home School Movement: The Home School Movement began in the 1970s and attracted evangelical Christians who feared the secular influences of public education.
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in Timelines)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Making meaning without a maker: Secular consciousness through narrative and cultural practice.
    Smith, Jesse M., and Caitlin L. Halligan (2021)
    Sociology of Religion 82:1: 85-110
    Based on field work in Sunday Assembly (secular) congregations in the U.S.A. & U.K. A sense of otherness, appeals to normative values, & reframing of existential questions in secular terms play a role in the lives of this nonreligious community.
    Associated Search Terms: Atheist; Participant observation; Sunday Assembly
  • Intersections of feminist identification and hostile sexism.
    Hernandez, Amanda D. (2021)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 60:1: 27-45.
    Analyzes 2016 American National Election Survey data; religious women are no more or less likely to identify as feminist than do nonreligious women; Evangelical & Black protestant men are less likely. Some feminists also express hostile sexist sentiment, suggesting ambivalence.
    Associated Search Terms: Prejudice, sexism; Ambivalence; Feminism
  • How do religion and sexual orientation affect support for U.S. presidential candidates? Evidence from a survey experiment.
    Beyerlein, Kraig, and JasonKlocek (2020)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 59:4: 551-568.
    Formed a questionnaire with gay/straight & religious/nonreligious candidate vignettes. The intersection of gay & religious drew little support.
    Associated Search Terms: Homosexuality; Experiment; Politics, U.S.A.; Intersectionality
  • None of the Above. Nonreligious Identity in the US and Canada.
    Thiessen, Joel, and Sarah Wilkins-LaFlamme (2020)
    New York: New York University Press.
    Associated Search Terms: Canada; Atheist, Canada; Atheist, U.S.A.; United States
  • More than nothing: Examining the worldview influences of nonreligious college students.
    Scheitle, Christopher P., and Katie E. Corcoran (2020)
    Review of Religious Research 62:2: 249-271.
    Non-religious students are less likely than religious students to cite family or cultural traditions as important worldview influences, & more likely to cite sexual orientation. Those non-religious at a previous time are also less likely to cite family, whether still non-religious or not. Those who become non-religious over time shift from religion & culture to philosophy.
    Associated Search Terms: Culture; Family; Students, undergraduate; World view
  • Religious heterogamy and the intergenerational transmission of religion in China.
    McPhail, Brian L., and Fenggang Yang (2020)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 59:3: 439-454.
    Analyzes 2007 Spiritual Life Survey of Chinese Residents data; having at least one religiously affiliated parent is associated with increased religiosity compared to having 2 nonreligious parents.
    Associated Search Terms: Socialization; Family; China
  • Certainty, uncertainty, or indifference? Examining variation in the identity narratives of nonreligious Americans.
    Frost, Jacqui (2019)
    American Sociological Review 84:5: 828-850.
    Drawings on identity narratives from 50 nonreligious Americans. Finds that uncertainty is as often experienced as positive & motivating as isolating or anxiety-inducing. Although certainty-filled beliefs & identities are available for the nonreligious, they are just as often rejected for more uncertain ones.
    Associated Search Terms: Atheist, U.S.A.; Belief; Certainty
  • Questions you should never ask an atheist: Towards better measures of nonreligion and secularity.
    Cragun, Ryan T. (2019)
    Secularism and Nonreligion 8: 1-6.
    Some measures fail to contrast nonreligiosity with religiosity. Other measures are double-barreled or one-and-a-half barreled, making them impossible for nonreligious individuals to answer. How questions are worded can result in very different estimates of how many nonreligious people & atheists there are in a population.
    Associated Search Terms: Methods; Atheist
  • The Varieties of Nonreligious Experience: Atheism in American Culture.
    Baggett, Jerome P. (2019)
    New York: New York University Press.
    Drawing on questionnaires and interviews with more than five hundred American atheists scattered across the country, The bolume uncovers what they think about morality, what gives meaning to their lives, how they feel about religious people, a&what they think and know about religion itself.
    Associated Search Terms: Atheist, U.S.A.
  • Selection versus socialization? Interrogating the sources of secularity inglobal science.
    Bolger, Daniel, Robert A. Thomson, Jr., and Elaine Howard Ecklund (2019)
    Sociological Perspectives 62:4: 518-537.
    We find some support for work suggesting that scientific training is secularizing. Yet we also show that, across national contexts, the nonreligious disproportionately select into scientific careers. Furthermore, we find that scientists tend not to identify science as the primary factor in their own religious transitions.
    Associated Search Terms: Scientist
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-51]  (of 51 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • Faith Matters Survey, 2006:
    The Faith Matters Survey was conducted on behalf of Harvard University by International Communications Research in the summer of 2006. The survey was generously funded by the John Templeton Foundation . The national survey interviewed roughly 3,100 Americans in an hour-long phone survey both about their religion (beliefs, belonging and behavior) and their social and political engagement. The data provided precise measurements of religious belief and behavior to help scholars determine their relative stability among different sub-populations and as compared to nonreligious beliefs and behaviors. Some variable names have been modified by the ARDA. Original variable names are in parentheses.
    Funded By: John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2006, Uploaded 3/19/2012
  • Faith Matters Survey, 2011:
    The 2011 Faith Matters Survey was conducted on behalf of Harvard University and the University of Notre Dame by Social Science Research Solutions/SSRS . The survey was generously funded by the John Templeton Foundation . This collection reinterviewed the respondents from 2006 Faith Matters Survey and also surveyed a new sample of respondents, asking questions about their religion (beliefs, belonging and behavior) and their social and political engagement. The data provide precise measurements of religious belief and behavior to help scholars determine their relative stability among different sub-populations and as compared to nonreligious beliefs and behaviors. Some variable names have been modified by the ARDA. Original variable names are in parentheses.
    Funded By: John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2011, Uploaded 4/15/2015
  • Faith Matters Survey, 2007:
    The 2007 Faith Matters Survey was conducted on behalf of Harvard University by International Communications Research . The survey was generously funded by the John Templeton Foundation . This collection reinterviewed the respondents from 2006 Faith Matters Survey about their religion (beliefs, belonging and behavior) and their social and political engagement. The data provide precise measurements of religious belief and behavior to help scholars determine their relative stability among different sub-populations and as compared to nonreligious beliefs and behaviors. Some variable names have been modified by the ARDA. Original variable names are in parentheses.
    Funded By: John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 3/16/2015
[Viewing Matches 1-3]  (of 3 total matches in the Data Archive Files)
Questions/Variables on Surveys
  • V63 from International Social Survey Programme 2008: Religion III
    Q31. Would you describe yourself as . . .
    1) Extremely religious
    2) Very religious
    3) Somewhat religious
    4) Neither religious nor nonreligious
    5) Somewhat nonreligious
    6) Very nonreligious
    7) Extremely nonreligious
    8) Can't choose
    9) No answer
  • DOUBTS2 from National Study of Youth and Religion, Wave 2 (2005)
    (doubts2_w2) [IF DOES NOT CONSIDER SELF RELIGIOUS OR PART OF ANY CHURCH, DK OR REF] [IF F:10=7 OR F:9=0, DK OR REF] F:24. In the last year, how much, if at all, have you had doubts about being nonreligious? Have you had . . .
    1) Many doubts
    2) Some doubts
    3) A few doubts
    4) No doubts
    5) Does Not Apply [INTERVIEWER: DO NOT READ]
    666) Invalid skip
    777) Don't know
    999) Not asked
  • JOBEXCAG from International Religious Freedom Data, Aggregate File (2001-2005)
    According to the Report, are people excluded from certain (nonreligious) jobs based on religion? [Non-integer responses indicate that the response to this question changed in one or more of the IRF Reports.]
    0) No
    0.333) 0.333
    0.667) 0.667
    1) Yes, some are.
    1.333) 1.333
    2) Yes, all are.
  • THREAG from International Religious Freedom Data, Aggregate File (2001-2005)
    According to the Report, are religious brands harassed by nonreligious social movements within society? [Non-integer responses indicate that the response to this question changed in one or more of the IRF Reports.]
    0) Never
    0.667) 0.667
    1) Within past 100 years
    1.333) 1.333
    1.667) 1.667
    2) Not presently but within past 10 years
    3) Yes
  • DEM2_SCHENRL_PRIVNONREL from American National Election Studies, Time Series Study, 2012
    PRE: School enrollment of child(ren) - mention private nonreligious
    -1) Inapplicable
    0) Not selected by respondent
    1) Selected by respondent
  • Q525R2 from Religious Freedom Index: American Perspectives on the First Amendment, 2020
    Please indicate if you support or oppose each of the following policies. - Religious organizations receiving government funding on an equal basis as nonreligious organizations, for programs such food banks, homeless shelters, or other charitable services.
    1) Strongly oppose
    2) Somewhat oppose
    3) Neither support nor oppose
    4) Somewhat support
    5) Strongly support
  • NONREL_LRG1_2000 from Religion and Rule of Law
    Nonrel_LRG1_2000
    0) Otherwise
    1) If Nonreligious is the largest religious group in the country in 2000
  • NONREL_MAJ1_2000 from Religion and Rule of Law
    Nonrel_MAJ1_2000
    0) Otherwise
    1) If Nonreligious is the majority religious group in the country in 2000
  • JOBEXC03 from International Religious Freedom Data, 2003
    According to the Report, are people excluded from certain (nonreligious) jobs based on religion?
    0) No
    1) Yes, some are
    2) Yes, all are
  • LRG1_2000 from Religion and Rule of Law
    Indicating the largest religious group in the country in 2000
    1) Protestantism (includes Protestants, Independents, and Anglicans combined)
    2) Catholicism
    4) Orthodox Christianity
    5) Islam
    6) African Ethnoreligion
    7) Buddhism
    8) Hinduism
    9) Judaism
    10) Nonreligious
    11) Other Religion
    14) Asian Ethnoreligion
    15) Chinese Folk Religion
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-42]  (of 42 total matches in Data Archive Questions/Variables)
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