QuickStats
[Viewing Matches 1-1]  (of 1 total matches in QuickStats)
Timeline
  • Buck, Pearl S.: Pearl Buck (1892-1973) was an award-winning novelist, whose liberal views on theology and Presbyterian missions drew criticism from conservative Presbyterians.
  • Everson v. Board of Education: In this 1947 case, the Supreme Court first applied the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment (i.e. no law establishing religion) to the states.
  • Lee, Jarena : Jarena Lee (1783-1855) was one of the first black female preachers in America.
  • Healy, James Augustine: James Augustine Healy (1830-1900) was the first Catholic American priest and bishop of African descent.
  • Payne, Daniel Alexander: Daniel Alexander Payne (1811-1893) was an African Methodist Episcopal Church bishop and the first black college president in the United States.
  • Hecker, Isaac : Isaac Hecker (1819-1888) was an intellectual forefather to the Catholic Americanist movement. He was dedicated to defending the Catholic Church and converting Americans to Catholicism.
  • Rushdoony, Rousas John: Rousas John Rushdoony (1916-2001), Presbyterian theologian and homeschooling advocate, laid the foundations for Christian Reconstructionism.
  • Augustus Tolton Becomes Ordained Catholic Priest : On April 24, 1886, Augustus Tolton became the first fully and recognizably African-American Catholic priest.
  • Anti-Cult Movement: In the 1960s and 1970s, the rise in new religious groups brought accusations of "brainwashing" from opposing groups, who became known as the anti-cult movement.
[Viewing Matches 1-9]  (of 9 total matches in Timelines)
Measurements
  • Religious Tradition of Parents: What religious tradition are the respondent's parents? What tradition was he/she raised in? Questions are sometimes used to check for switching in respondents and sometimes used to check for agreement between parents.
  • Church Attendance of Family Members, Frequency of: How often do people in the respondent's family- spouse, parents, etc. attend religious services. Do NOT include friends.
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Father), 1971: This additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Mother), 1971: This additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Grandchild), 1971: This additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Father-in-Law), 1971: This additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Mother-in-Law), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Child), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Grandmother), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
  • Affectual Solidarity Scale (Grandfather), 1971: his additive scale displays the degree of emotional closeness between generations. Respondents are asked a series of questions about their parents, children, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, grandparents, and great-grandparents, with responses ranging from "not at all," or "not at all close" to "extremely well," or "extremely close."
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-12]  (of 12 total matches in Measurement Concepts)
ARDA Dictionary
  • Parents' Religious Affiliation, Measure of:This survey item asks respondents what religious tradition their parents ascribe to and allows researchers to investigate why individuals maintain or change from the religious tradition they were exposed to when younger. Examples of this measure are found in the 2005 Baylor Religion Survey , 2003 National Study of Youth and Religion and 1998 General Social Survey , all of which are available in the ARDA's Data Archive.
  • Attachment Theory:Attachment theory, under a religious framework, posits that religion can be explained by understanding the human need for attachment in general and one's relationship to her/his parents specifically.
  • Social Disorganization:A breakdown of society marked by high rates of migration and by sparse or fragmented networks of social relations. Common indicators used for social disorganization include: population turnover, density and heterogeneity (racial and/or economic), as well as crime rates, unemployment and single-parent households.
  • Reductionism:An attempt at an explanation, often reducing complex phenomena to simpler, more fundamental phenomena (Hood, Hill, and Spilka 2009:23). Although somewhat helpful, reductionism may lead to narrow interpretations. For example, Sigmund Freud (1989) reduced religion to an infantile projection of one's parental figure, a perhaps oversimplified explanation of religion.
  • Immaculate Conception:A teaching of the Roman Catholic Church that the Blessed Virgin Mary, by a singular grace and privilege of God, through the merits of her son Jesus Christ, was preserved from the stain or effects of original sin from the first moment of her conception by her parents. This teaching is not the same as the virgin birth of Jesus (Reid et al. 1990: 567).
  • Marital Instability, Religion and:Marital instability is ongoing conflict in marriage either because of communication problems, disagreements about parenting or gender roles, financial difficulties, lack of trust, or presence of alcohol or drug problems (Koenig et al. 2012: 256). Lack of marital happiness, infidelity, abuse and divorce represent aspects of marital instability. It can arise out of unrealistic cultural expectations for marriage (Cherlin 2009; Nock 1987), marital problems from parents (Amato and Patterson 2017; Whitton et al. 2008), economic instability (Nunley and Seals 2010) and other reasons. Koenig and colleagues (2012) examined 79 quantitative studies on religion and marital instability and found that 87 percent of the studies found a negative relationship between religion and marital instability (e.g., divorce, abuse, infidelity, etc.), meaning as religiousness increased, marital instability decreased. Given how religion is associated with positive coping, marital commitment and proscriptions against divorce, it operates as a protective factor against marital problems. The exception, however, is when spouses have different religious backgrounds, which tends to increase marital instability (Curtis and Ellison 2002; Vaaler, Ellison and Powers 2009).
  • Anti-Cult Movement:As new religious groups grew in popularity, in part due to the counterculture of the 1960s, conservative opposition emerged in the form of the anti-cult movement. Not only did anti-cult advocates fear unorthodox religious beliefs and practices, but parents of converts and ex-members would often accuse new religious groups of "brainwashing" converts. The anti-cult movement gained prominence in 1978, after 909 members of the People's Temple died in Guyana after drinking cyanide-laced fruit juice. By the mid-1980s, however, the anti-cult movement began to dwindle, as American-based movements, like the Latter-day Saints, became more mainstream, and academics/health professionals largely debunked the “brainwashing” techniques suggested by the anti-cult movement.
[Viewing Matches 1-7]  (of 7 total matches in the ARDA Dictionary)
Religious Groups
[Viewing Matches 1-2]  (of 2 total matches in Religious Groups)
Citations
Citations are taken from the Sociology of Religion Searchable Bibliographic Database, created and updated by Anthony J. Blasi (Ph.D. in Sociology, University of Notre Dame; University of Texas at San Antonio). The ARDA is not responsible for content or typographical errors.
  • Handing Down the Faith. How Parents Pass Their Religion on to the Next Generation.
    Smith, Christian, and Amy Adamczyk (2021)
    New York: Oxford University Press.
    Analyzes U.S.A. survey data & extended interviews from parents in major cities. Finds parents instrumental in socializing children into religions, especially through casual conversations.
    Associated Search Terms: Family; United States; Socialization
  • National context, parental socialization, and the varying relationship between religious belief and practice.
    Voas, David, and Ingrid Storm (2021)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 60:1: 189-197.
    Analyzes 2008 International Social Survey Program data. Levels of personal & national religiosity are both important in religious socialization, but their effects are independently of each other.
    Associated Search Terms: Belief; Contextual effects; Family; Socialization; Practice
  • Belief in Hell and parenting priorities concerning child independence and obedience: Does economic context matter?
    Jung, Jong Hyun (2020)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 59:4: 629-645.
    Analyzes 2010-14 World Values Survey data. Belief in Hell inversely predicts parental endorsement of child independence more greatly in economically developed nations, more greatly positively predicts endorsement of obedience by children in those nations.
    Associated Search Terms: Family; Belief; Socialization; Obedience
  • Religious heterogamy and the intergenerational transmission of religion in China.
    McPhail, Brian L., and Fenggang Yang (2020)
    Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion 59:3: 439-454.
    Analyzes 2007 Spiritual Life Survey of Chinese Residents data; having at least one religiously affiliated parent is associated with increased religiosity compared to having 2 nonreligious parents.
    Associated Search Terms: Socialization; Family; China
  • The gendered relationship between parental religiousness and children's marriage timing.
    Brauner-Otto, Sarah R., and Lisa Pearce (2020)
    Sociology of Religion 81:4: 413-438.
    Analyzes 1996-2008 panel data from the Chitwan Valley Family Study in Nepal. Sons having more religious fathers married earlier than those having less religious fathers; but having more religious mothers married later. There were no such patterns for daughters. Mothers seemingly experienced ambivalence over early marriage of sons.
    Associated Search Terms: Ambivalence; Hindu, Nepal; Family; Gender; Nepal; Marriage
  • Can the state accelerate the secular transition? Secularization in East and west Germany as a natural experiment.
    Stolz, Jörg, Detlef Pollack, and Nan Dirk De Graaf (2020)
    European Sociological Review 36:4: 626-642. https://doi.org/10.1093/esr/jcaa014
    In East Germany, the state accelerated the secular transition substantially; through coercion, incentive structures, & education, it succeeded in triggering mass disaffiliations from the church irrespective of age & in discouraging parents from socializing their children religiously.
    Associated Search Terms: Disaffiliation; Germany, East; Persecution
  • Secularization among immigrants in Scandinavia: Religiosity across generations and duration of residence
    Kasselstrand, Isabella, and Setareh Mahmoudi (2020)
    Social Compass 67:4: 617-638.
    Analyzes European Social Survey data from Sweden; 2nd-generation immigrants are more secular than the 1st, but more religious than their native peers. Individuals with 1 immigrant & 1 native parent are less likely to identify with a religion than others, including the native majority. Among 1st-generation immigrants, there is a negative relationship between the duration of residence & religiosity.
    Associated Search Terms: Migrant; Sweden; Generations
  • Parents just don't understand: Parental support, religion and depressive symptoms among same-race and itnerracial relationships.
    Henderson, Andrea K., and Mia J. Brantley (2019)
    Religions 10:3: 162
    Analyzes National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health data; weak parental support is associated with depressive symptoms for individuals in both same-race & interracial relationships, however the authors find limited support of religion protecting against weak parental support for individuals in interracial unions.
    Associated Search Terms: Race; Depression; Family
  • Religious Parenting. Transmitting Faith and Values in Contemporary America.
    Smith, Christian, Bridget Ritz, and Michael Rotolo (2019)
    Princeton, New Jersey: Princeton University Press.
    Parents in the U.S.A. believe they should equip their children with knowledge of their religion by routinely modeling its practices, values, & ethics.
    Associated Search Terms: Socialization; Family
  • Religious heterogamy and the intergenerational transmission of religion: A cross-national analysis.
    McPhail, Brian L. (2019)
    Religions 10:2: 1–16.
    Analyzes International Social Survey Programme data; having religiously heterogamous parents or parents with dissimilar religious attendance patterns are both associated with lower overall religiosity in respondents.
    Associated Search Terms: Family; Socialization
[Viewing Matches 1-10] > [View Matches 1-150]  (of 270 total matches in Citations)
Data Archive
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Contextual Database, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    To provide an array of community characteristics by which researchers may investigate the nature of such contextual influences for a wide range of adolescent health behaviors, selected contextual variables have been calculated and compiled. These are provided in this Contextual Database, already linked to the Add Health respondent IDs.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use In-Home, In-School, and Parent Questionnaire Data, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Included in this dataset are the in-home interviews, in-school questionnaire, and parent questionnaire.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Network Data, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    This network data includes network variables constructed from the Add Health in-school data and friendship nominations.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Grand Sample Weights, Wave I:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States during the 1994-95 school year. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Included here are weights to remove any differences between the composition of the sample and the estimated composition of the population. See the attached codebook for information regarding how these weights were calculated.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1995, Uploaded 10/19/2015
  • National Study of Youth and Religion, Wave 1 (2003):
    The National Survey of Youth and Religion (NSYR) is a nationally representative telephone survey of 3,290 English and Spanish-speaking teenagers between the ages of 13 and 17, and their parents. The NSYR also includes 80 oversampled Jewish households, not nationally representative, bringing the total number of completed NSYR cases to 3,370. The purpose of the NSYR is to research the shape and influence of religion and spirituality in the lives of American youth; to identify effective practices in the religious, moral, and social formation of the lives of youth; to describe the extent and perceived effectiveness of the programs and opportunities that religious communities are offering to their youth; and to foster an informed national discussion about the influence of religion in youth's lives, in order to encourage sustained reflection about and rethinking of our cultural and institutional practices with regard to youth and religion.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc.
    Collected: 2003, Uploaded 5/8/2007
  • National Study of Youth and Religion, Wave 3 (2007-2008):
    In Wave 3 every attempt was made to re-interview all English-speaking Wave 1 youth survey respondents. At the time of this third survey the respondents were between the ages of 18-24. The survey was conducted from September 24, 2007 through April 21, 2008 using a Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) system programmed using Blaise software. The Howard W. Odum Institute for Research in Social Sciences at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (Odum Institute) was hired to field the Wave 3 survey. Telephone calls were spread out over varying days and times, including nights and weekends. Every effort was made to re-contact and re-survey all original NSYR respondents (whether they completed the Wave 2 telephone survey or not), including those out of the country, in the military, and on religious missions. There were more difficulties in contacting and completing the survey with respondents who were in the military during Wave 3 because some of them were serving on active duty and were unable to be reached. Even their families were often unaware of their specific locations and did not have any knowledge of phone numbers or addresses where they could be reached. The Wave 3 Survey instrument replicated many of the questions asked in Waves 1 and 2 with some changes made to better capture the respondents' lives as they grew older. For example, there were fewer questions on parental monitoring and more on post-high school educational aspirations.

    Many variable names have been truncated to allow for downloading of the data set as an SPSS portable file. Original variable names are shown in parentheses at the beginning of each variable description.
    Funded By: The Lilly Endowment, Inc.
    Collected: 2008, Uploaded 9/14/2009
  • National Survey of High School Biology Teachers:
    The National Survey of High School Biology Teachers is based on a nationally representative probability sample of U.S. public high school biology teachers. A total of 926 teachers completed questionnaires, either pencil and paper surveys or on the web, between March 1 and May 5 of 2007. Teachers responded to 86 questions pertaining to their educational backgrounds, teaching practices, and personal attitudes. The survey focused on respondents' approach to teaching evolution and creationism in the classroom. Teachers' personal views and understanding of evolution were examined, as well as potential outside influences on their teaching, such as parents, school board members, and religious leaders.
    Funded By: National Science Foundation Spencer Foundation John Templeton Foundation
    Collected: 2007, Uploaded 3/18/2011
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Contextual Database, Wave II:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    To provide an array of community characteristics by which researchers may investigate the nature of such contextual influences for a wide range of adolescent health behaviors, selected contextual variables have been calculated and compiled. These are provided in this Contextual Database, already linked to the Add Health respondent IDs.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 1996, Uploaded 1/8/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Children and Parenting Data, Wave IV:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades seven through 12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32.* Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades seven through 12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    Wave IV was designed to study the developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into young adulthood. Biological data was gathered in an attempt to acquire a greater understanding of pre-disease pathways, with a specific focus on obesity, stress, and health risk behavior. Included in this dataset are the Wave IV children and parenting data.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2009, Uploaded 4/25/2016
  • National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health, Public Use Children and Parenting Data, Wave III:
    The National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health) is a longitudinal study of a nationally representative sample of adolescents in grades 7-12 in the United States. The Add Health cohort has been followed into young adulthood with four in-home interviews, the most recent in 2008, when the sample was aged 24-32*. Add Health combines longitudinal survey data on respondents' social, economic, psychological and physical well-being with contextual data on the family, neighborhood, community, school, friendships, peer groups, and romantic relationships, providing unique opportunities to study how social environments and behaviors in adolescence are linked to health and achievement outcomes in young adulthood. The fourth wave of interviews expanded the collection of biological data in Add Health to understand the social, behavioral, and biological linkages in health trajectories as the Add Health cohort ages through adulthood. The fifth wave of data collection is planned to begin in 2016.

    Initiated in 1994 and supported by three program project grants from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) with co-funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations, Add Health is the largest, most comprehensive longitudinal survey of adolescents ever undertaken. Beginning with an in-school questionnaire administered to a nationally representative sample of students in grades 7-12, the study followed up with a series of in-home interviews conducted in 1995, 1996, 2001-02, and 2008. Other sources of data include questionnaires for parents, siblings, fellow students, and school administrators and interviews with romantic partners. Preexisting databases provide information about neighborhoods and communities.

    Add Health was developed in response to a mandate from the U.S. Congress to fund a study of adolescent health, and Waves I and II focus on the forces that may influence adolescents' health and risk behaviors, including personal traits, families, friendships, romantic relationships, peer groups, schools, neighborhoods, and communities. As participants have aged into adulthood, however, the scientific goals of the study have expanded and evolved. Wave III, conducted when respondents were between 18 and 26** years old, focuses on how adolescent experiences and behaviors are related to decisions, behavior, and health outcomes in the transition to adulthood. At Wave IV, respondents were ages 24-32* and assuming adult roles and responsibilities. Follow up at Wave IV has enabled researchers to study developmental and health trajectories across the life course of adolescence into adulthood using an integrative approach that combines the social, behavioral, and biomedical sciences in its research objectives, design, data collection, and analysis.

    * 52 respondents were 33-34 years old at the time of the Wave IV interview.
    ** 24 respondents were 27-28 years old at the time of the Wave III interview.

    The Wave III public-use data are helpful in analyzing the transition between adolescence and young adulthood. Included in this dataset are data on children and parenting.
    Funded By: Department of Health and Human Services , National Institutes of Health , Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health & Human Development , with cooperative funding from 23 other federal agencies and foundations.
    Collected: 2002, Uploaded 2/15/2016
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